Canucks hope to spread awareness, communication about depression after Rick Rypien’s death

The news of Rick Rypien’s death left many people in the hockey world shocked and dismayed, but if there was team that was hit the hardest, it would have to be the Vancouver Canucks. While Rypien signed his last contract with the Winnipeg Jets in June, the Canucks were the only NHL team he ever actually played for. It only makes sense, then, that several people associated with the organization attended his funeral, including GM Mike Gillis and players such as Kevin Bieksa – who was one of the pallbearers.

There were many who wanted to blame the Canucks for failing to help Rypien with his issues, but all indications were that the team did its best to get the troubled but well-respected tough guy the help he needed. Sadly, such guidance and care ultimately wasn’t enough, a thought that must sadden many within the organization.

While the NHL and its players association will reportedly try to learn from the deaths of Rypien and fellow former fighter Derek Boogaard by tweaking their support programs, the Canucks want to help combat depression after Rypien’s death. The Vancouver Sun’s Iain MacIntyre reports that the Canucks aren’t quite sure how they want to address depression in the wake of that jarring loss just yet, though.

What form this takes is still a long way from being determined. The important thing is the team isn’t planning to simply stick Rypien’s number somewhere inside Rogers Arena and turn the page on one of saddest incidents in franchise history.

“The nature of hockey, as you know, is that people are reluctant to talk about whether they even have a charley horse,” Gillis said Tuesday. “People can be cruel. People can sit at a computer and write whatever they want or sit in the stands and scream and say personal things. You’re constantly trying to protect yourself … so things remain private. We weren’t entitled to talk about Rick’s case publicly.

“[But] Rick wanted a level of awareness to the point where he came and spoke to me specifically about it. He wanted to discuss these issues, thinking he could help other people. It was important to him and it remains important to us.

“That might be the first step to opening up other doors. We’ve talked about establishing a fund to direct resources to mental illness. We’re going to take our time to make sure we do it correctly.”

As the piece details, depression is a complex issue that might not have a simple solution. It’s not really a disease that can be cured with a one-time treatment or a few motivational speeches. That being said, the communication-centric approach that Gillis and others are promoting seems like a wise one. Many have an instinct to “bury” their problems or a fear of burdening others with their issues, but there should be no shame in leaning on others – whether they be loved ones, friends or health care professionals – for support.

Sports are often a safe house where we can avoid many of life’s problems, but professional athletes fight the same demons as anyone else. It’s tough to cope with a story as sad as Rypien’s, but perhaps his death will encourage others who are struggling with some of the same crises to get help. It’s heartening to see that the Canucks are hoping to be a part of that process, too.

Karlsson is back skating, but ‘we don’t want him to get too excited,’ says Boucher

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The good news? Erik Karlsson hit the ice to skate with his Ottawa Senators teammates on Saturday.

“Back at it,” is what the star defenseman wrote in an Instagram post, which included a photo of him on the ice in a blue jersey.

It’s certainly an exciting development for the Senators and their fans. Karlsson was a dominant player for Ottawa during the Stanley Cup playoffs despite playing with a foot injury that later required surgery, with an expected recovery time of four months.

Head coach Guy Boucher, however, offered some cautionary words on Karlsson’s status. Basically, it’s exciting, but Boucher doesn’t want anyone — Karlsson included — to get too far ahead of themselves right now.

“It’s a positive thing, but we don’t want to get too excited. It’s a second step,” said Boucher, according to NHL.com.

“The first step was to let the therapists tell us when it was adequate to put him on the ice, because you need to get the flexibility and the strength off the ice before we could put [him] on the ice. Yesterday they apparently put the skates on to see how it felt and [went] very lightly on the ice, and they felt he was able this morning [to] get dressed and be with the boys.

“Basically, this is the second step, but there’s quite a few steps before we get to him playing. We don’t want him to get too excited.”

His status for the Senators’ season opener against the Washington Capitals on Oct. 5 has been up in the air since he underwent the operation. Karlsson admitted earlier this month that he wasn’t sure if he’d be ready for that game.

Ottawa is dealing with a few injury situations right now, with four preseason games remaining on their schedule. Karlsson is one of the best defensemen in the entire NHL and given how important he is to the Senators, there is absolutely no need to rush him back into the lineup if he’s not ready.

 

NHL suspends Tom Wilson two preseason games for interference

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Capitals forward Tom Wilson has been suspended for two preseason games for interference, after his late hit on St. Louis Blues forward Robert Thomas during Friday’s exhibition game.

The incident occurred early in the third period, as Wilson caught Thomas with a heavy and late hit along the boards at the Blues bench.

“Over a full second after Thomas loses control of the puck, well past the point where Thomas is eligible to be checked, Wilson comes in from the side and delivers a forceful body check, knocking Thomas to the ice,” stated a member of the NHL Department of Player Safety in a video explanation of the suspension.

“In addition to the lateness of the hit, what elevates this hit to the level of supplemental discipline is the predatory nature and force of the hit. Wilson tracks Thomas for some time and alters his course to ensure he is able to finish his hit. Then, with the puck long gone from Thomas’ control, Wilson finishes the check with force.”

The Capitals continue their preseason schedule Saturday against the Carolina Hurricanes. They also play the New Jersey Devils on Wednesday.

Letang set to return to Penguins lineup vs. Blues on Sunday

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For the first time since February, Kris Letang is expected to be in the Pittsburgh Penguins lineup when they face the St. Louis Blues on Sunday.

Letang hasn’t played since Feb. 21. He underwent neck surgery in April and missed the entire Stanley Cup playoffs as a result. Despite the absence of their best defenseman, which is a huge loss in Letang, the Penguins were able to overcome that and emerge as champions over Nashville.

According to Pens Inside Scoop on Saturday, head coach Mike Sullivan said Letang will play in Sunday’s Kraft Hockeyville game between the Penguins and St. Louis Blues.

That wasn’t the only Letang news Saturday:

Getting Letang back into the lineup will provide a huge boost to an already strong Penguins team, with his ability to log heavy minutes and act as a catalyst in Pittsburgh’s offensive attack.

“I want to be the same player I was before. I don’t see any reason why I wouldn’t be able to do that,” said Letang. “Hopefully everything goes well and I go back to the old way, playing over 25 minutes and in all situations.”

But what is most critical is having Letang healthy, and Sullivan this offseason has stressed to the star defenseman to recognize situations when he should make a simple play rather than risk taking an unnecessary hit.

“When people try to dissect all of that, they make assumptions that they understand, but they don’t,” Letang told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

“Mike and I have a clear understanding of what he wants me to do. I think I’m tired of hearing people around it because I had a talk with Mike and Jim. It’s just a way of avoiding those unnecessary hits. It’s not going to be reducing ice time or anything like that. It’s taking a different approach on certain plays.”

Related: Letang isn’t interested in getting less ice time now that he’s healthy

Canucks’ Horvat out a week with upper-body injury

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The Canucks will resume their preseason schedule on Thursday, although it appears right now that Bo Horvat will likely not be in the lineup.

Just prior to puck drop against the L.A. Kings on Saturday, the Canucks announced that Horvat is expected to be out a week with an upper-body injury.

Per Dan Murphy of Sportsnet, the injury occurred on a hit from Drew Doughty during the first game of the two-game exhibition series between the Canucks and Kings in China.

The good news for the Canucks is that their regular season schedule begins on Oct. 7, which would give Horvat two weeks to get fully healthy and ready for the opener against Connor McDavid and the Oilers.

The 22-year-old Horvat enjoyed a 20-goal, 52-point season in 2016-17, emerging as the team’s leading scorer and one of the few bright spots during another disappointing season for the Canucks. As a result, he signed a six-year, $33 million contract extension earlier this month.

Related: Horvat believes he is ‘just scratching the surface’