Antti Niemi

BioSteel is quickly becoming NHL players’ drink of choice during games

There was a time when hockey players – even professional ones – weren’t exactly the types of athletes with statuesque bodies. The modern NHL’s top players provide a stark comparison to those comparatively flabby older days though, thanks to the increased efficiency of workout routines, availability of personal trainers and rule changes that reward speed and skill. With the overall fitness level at a much higher mark, there’s one area in which some players can gain a small – but perhaps significant – edge: superior nutrition.

We’ve already discussed the considerable demand for former NHL player Gary Roberts’ suggestions for what players should eat (along with how they should train), but one area that hasn’t gotten as much attention – at least in media reports – is what they decide to drink.

There’s a fairly large industry hoping to quench the thirsts of professional athletes and Average Joes alike, with Gatorade in position as the biggest name on the block. Unfortunately, the long-time king of quench’s drinks have some considerable drawbacks, including the well-documented problems it can cause for your teeth.

The Globe & Mail’s James Mirtle couldn’t help but wonder what drink often ends up in the green Gatorade bottles players use during games. He found that it’s often not Gatorade or even water, but increasingly a product called BioSteel that was developed by a former Toronto Maple Leafs trainer named Matt Nichol.

More and more, players are filling those sponsored bottles with a new drink called BioSteel, which was developed by trainer Matt Nichol, championed by Montreal Canadiens star Mike Cammalleri and is now being used by nearly half of the league.

Nichol touts his “high-performance sports drink” as being superior to others on the market, and he has some numbers to back it up, with 18 NHL teams placing orders last season.

And this week at BioSteel’s annual camp in Toronto, 20 NHLers and 16 top prospects are all training under Nichol and using his supplements, in part to get ready for the season and also to help spread the word about the work he’s doing.


What started as a “little pink drink” – a mix of amino acids and electrolytes that Nichol cooked up when he was the Toronto Maple Leafs strength and conditioning coach – finally began to catch on in a big way after Cammalleri first tried it three years ago.

The drink seems like it’s gathering steam around the league and is even gaining attention from other sports including the NBA, according to Mirtle’s reports. Steven Stamkos is one of the product’s biggest proponents, although it must be noted that he’s a paid endorser (which means you can only trust such testimonials so much). Then again, I’d rather see my top paid player pump a sports drink rather than, say, a candy bar

You can check out the product at its Web site and read more about Nichol in Mirtle’s report. In case you’re wondering if the Gatorade people are angry that players are pouring another product in their green bottles, Nichol’s had this amusing comment.

Getting their name on all those water bottles, however, probably isn’t in the cards just yet.

“Gatorade’s got a league-wide deal and a lot more money that me,” Nichol said. “They’re pretty smart. But I think you could probably drink a vodka soda out of the Gatorade bottle as long as it’s in the right bottle.”

Maybe our more electrolyte and amino acid-attuned readers can provide a little more insight into which sports drinks are the best for professional athletes and armchair ice hockey players alike, but hopefully most players opt against “vodka and soda” and other questionable choices, such as Zdeno Chara’s not-so-hydrating favorite: Coca-Cola.

Lucic: If I wanted to hurt Couture, ‘I would have hurt him’


Last night in Los Angeles, Kings forward Milan Lucic received a match penalty after skating the entire width of the ice to give San Jose’s Logan Couture a two-hand shove to the face.

Lucic didn’t hurt Couture, who had caught Lucic with an open-ice hit that Lucic didn’t like. Couture’s smiling, mocking face was good evidence that the Sharks’ forward was going to be OK.

This morning, Lucic was still in disbelief that he was penalized so harshly.

“I didn’t cross any line,” Lucic said, per Rich Hammond of the O.C. Register. “Believe me, if my intentions were to hurt him, I would have hurt him.”

While Lucic knew he deserved a penalty, he said after the game that he didn’t “know why it was called a match penalty.” His coach, Darryl Sutter, agreed, calling it “a borderline even roughing penalty.”

And though former NHL referee Kerry Fraser believes a match penalty was indeed warranted, Lucic said this morning that he hasn’t heard from the NHL about any possible supplemental discipline.

Nor for that matter has Dustin Brown, after his high hit on Couture in the first period.

In conclusion, it’s good to have hockey back.

Related: Sutter says Kings weren’t ‘interested’ in checking the Sharks

Torres apologizes to Silfverberg and Sharks


A statement from Raffi Torres:

“I accept the 41-game suspension handed down to me by the NHL’s Department of Player Safety. I worked extremely hard over the last two years following reconstructive knee surgery to resume my NHL career, and this is the last thing I wanted to happen. I am disappointed I have put myself in a position to be suspended again. I sincerely apologize to Jakob for the hit that led to this suspension, and I’m extremely thankful that he wasn’t seriously injured as a result of the play. I also want to apologize to my Sharks teammates and the organization.”

A statement from San Jose GM Doug Wilson:

“The Sharks organization fully supports the NHL’s supplementary discipline decision regarding Raffi. While we do not believe there was any malicious intent, this type of hit is unacceptable and has no place in our game. There is a difference between playing hard and crossing the line and there is no doubt, in this instance, Raffi crossed that line. We’re very thankful that Jakob was not seriously injured as a result of this play.”

Silfverberg says he expects to play Saturday when the Ducks open their regular season Saturday in San Jose.