Boston Bruins v Vancouver Canucks - Game Five

Ehrhoff meets the press in Buffalo


A month and a half after becoming the Sabres’ $40 million man, Christian Ehrhoff finally met face-to-face with the Buffalo media. It might not be as pressure packed as the media circus in Vancouver, but with that shiny new contract in hand, Ehrhoff can expect more pressure than he’s ever experienced in his career. Such is life when he’s the new guy in town and just signed a contract that pays $10 million next season and will keep him in Buffalo for the next decade.

Forget “good.” “Good” is an adjective reserved for guys who come-and-go and make millions less. Ehrhoff better be spectacular. If he is, it’ll go a long way towards making the Sabres legitimate contenders in the Eastern Conference and possibly the Stanley Cup.

At least Ehrhoff knows what he’s getting into. For his part, he knows the weight that will be on his shoulders:

“Pressure is part of the business and you have to deal with those expectations and that pressure. I played in Vancouver before. It’s a very pressure-filled city and I think I’ve dealt with that pretty good.”

Part of the pressure is the vital role he’s expected to play on the team. The Sabres are expected to be an up-tempo team and Ehrhoff’s transition game should play right into their team philosophy. His booming slap shot has the potential help the Sabres improve upon their 19.4% power play that was good for 9th in the league last year. His 14 goals were good for 6th among defenseman; his 50 points was 7th among blueliners and a career high. This just in: he’s an offensive defenseman.

His up-tempo game should be a perfect complement to another defensive newcomer: defensive stalwart Robyn Regehr. Head coach Lindy Ruff is excited to see Ehrhoff excel with his new team:

“Christian fits the way we play,” said coach Lindy Ruff. “We’re a team that has our defense involved and gets up ice. If you look at the way Vancouver’s defense played and were involved in the offensive side of the game, it’s an automatic fit.”

For his part, Ehrhoff thinks it should be a good fit as well. Once he dealt with the disappointment of getting traded from the Canucks (he thought they were making progress), he turned his attention to his future. Yes, he was looking for a raise from the $3.4 million contract that he earned last season. But at the same time, he wanted to play for a championship. Many will remember that he turned down a deal worth more per year from the New York Islanders a day before the Sabres acquired his negotiating rights.

Ehrhoff says he signed in Buffalo for the opportunity to win with the Sabres.

It also sounds like he did his due diligence before signing on the dotted line with Sabres GM Darcy Regier and Co. After weighing his options and asking former teammates, he was comfortable with the situation.

“Everybody had good things to say about the city of Buffalo being a great place to live with your kids and a good place for them to grow up – which was another criteria I was looking for. And since Terry (Pegula) took over the team he has showed that he is very committed to putting a team together that can win the Stanley Cup. For me it made a lot of sense and that’s why I joined the team.”

All of this is the easy part. For the time being, Ehrhoff has a honeymoon period with the media and fans alike. He’s the new guy who brings hope and the promise of success. If he fits in as Ruff expects and produces like he has for the Canucks over the last two seasons, then $4 million will be a relative bargain for a top-flight point producing defenseman. But if he struggles, the stories won’t be as positive as they are today. $4 million can sound like a good deal for a guy playing well—but the flip side to Ehrhoff’s contract is that his $10 million could look like a huge mistake if he is anything less than magnificent.

But like he said, he’s dealt with the demands of Vancouver. Playing with daily pressure should be nothing new for the German newcomer. We’ll see.

As far as Benning is concerned, ‘the Sedins are going to retire as Vancouver Canucks’

Henrik Sedin, Daniel Sedin
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You may recall over the summer when the Sedin twins were asked by a Swedish news outlet if they’d ever consider waiving their no-trade clauses and playing for a team that wasn’t the Vancouver Canucks.

Their answer? They had no intention — none whatsoever — of leaving Vancouver, even if they were presented with an opportunity to join a Stanley Cup contender.


Yes, there was a but.

They didn’t definitively say they’d refuse to waive. If, for instance, management were to approach them during the final season of their contracts (2017-18), well, maybe they’d have to consider it.

And, so, because it was the summer and there was nothing else to talk about, and because it had only been a short time since the Flames had made the Canucks look so old and slow in the playoffs, it became a topic of conversation among the fans and media.

Today, GM Jim Benning was asked if he’d put an end to the rumors.

“As far as I’m concerned, the Sedins are going to retire as Vancouver Canucks,” Benning told TSN 1040.

Daniel Sedin currently ranks fourth in NHL scoring with 25 points in 23 games. Henrik is tied for 14th with 22 points. Even at 35, they’re still excellent players.

“I don’t know if they’re getting better, but they’re not getting any worse,” said Blackhawks coach Joel Quenneville on Saturday, after the twins had combined for nine points in beating the defending champs.

It’s also worth noting that there’s far more optimism in Vancouver about the Canucks’ youth. Last year, there was only Bo Horvat to get excited about. This year, there’s Horvat, Jared McCann, Jake Virtanen and Ben Hutton.

True, the youngsters still have a ways to go. And yes, there are still some glaring holes in the Canucks’ lineup — most notably on the blue line, a tough area to address via trade or free agency. 

It may be in Vancouver’s best long-term interests to miss the playoffs this season and get into the draft lottery. 

But you never know, if they hang around a few more years, with a little luck and some good moves by management, the Sedins might not be done chasing the Cup after all.

NHL has no plans to change waiver rules

Manny Malhotra Ryan Stanton
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Even with all the young players that have been healthy scratches this season, don’t expect the NHL to change its waiver rules.

Deputy commissioner Bill Daly told PHT in an email that it’s not something that’s “ever been considered.”

“For better or worse that’s what waiver rules are there for,” Daly wrote. “They force Clubs to make tough decisions.”

Today, Montreal defenseman Jarred Tinordi became the latest waiver-eligible youngster to be sent to the AHL on a two-week conditioning loan.

Tinordi, 23, has yet to play a single game for the Habs this season. If he were still exempt from waivers, he’d have undoubtedly been sent to the AHL long before he had to watch so many NHL games from the press box.

In light of situations like Tinordi’s, some have suggested the NHL change the rules. Currently, the only risk-free way for waiver-eligible players to get playing time in the AHL is via conditioning stint, and, as mentioned, those are limited to 14 days in length.

So the Habs will, indeed, need to make a “tough decision” when Tinordi’s conditioning stint is up. Do they put him in the lineup? Do they keep him in the press box and wait for an injury or some other circumstance to create an opportunity for him to play? Do they risk losing him to waivers by attempting to send him to the AHL? Do they trade him?

Your call, Marc Bergevin.

Related: Stanislav Galiev is stuck in the NHL

Ortio clears waivers, assigned to Flames’ AHL team

Joni Ortio
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Joni Ortio has cleared waivers and been assigned to AHL Stockton, the Calgary Flames announced today.

The 24-year-old goalie was always likely to clear, what with his dreadful numbers this season (0-2-1, .868),

But we suppose there was always the chance he’d get picked up, so it’s a relief for the Flames all the same. With a little more time to hone his game in the AHL, Ortio could still turn out to be a quality NHL netminder.

In a related move, veteran goalie Jonas Hiller has been activated from injured reserve. Hiller and Karri Ramo are the only goalies on the Flames’ active roster now.

Price placed on injured reserve; Yakupov to miss 2-4 weeks with sprained ankle

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Two injury updates in one post.

First, the situation with Montreal goalie Carey Price, who was hurt last night versus the Rangers.

According to Canadiens coach Michel Therrien, Price has been placed on injured reserve with a lower-body injury. That means he’ll be out at least a week, though no exact timeline was provided.

“We don’t know how long Carey will be out, but for us it’s business as usual,” said Therrien.

Mike Condon will get the start tomorrow in New Jersey.

As for Oilers forward Nail Yakupov, he’ll be out 2-4 weeks after spraining his ankle last night in Carolina while getting tangled up with a linesman.