Trent Hunter

Could Trent Hunter fit in well with Anaheim?

When Trent Hunter was acquired by the New Jersey Devils in the deal that sent Brian Rolston to the New York Islanders, it initially seemed like the sort of move that not only saved the Devils money, but helped them depth-wise on the right wing. That thought didn’t last long as the Devils waived and then bought Hunter out of his contract making him an unrestricted free agent.

With Hunter on the market and a few teams out there still in need of help along the wing, he’s someone that could be seen as a good fit on the third or fourth line and one team that could be in serious need of help there is Anaheim. The Ducks have reigning MVP Corey Perry locked in on the first line, but after that things get a little scary. We won’t find out until next month if Teemu Selanne will be returning for another year, and while we love enforcer George Parros he’s not exactly the guy you want starting on your second or third line.

Things look a bit perilous depth-wise on the right side for the Ducks, so should they be taking a longer look at Trent Hunter? Eric Stephens of the Orange County Register takes a closer look at what Hunter could provide the Ducks.

When asked if the club has made any overtures to the veteran was looking to sign the longtime New York Islanders forward, Hunter’s agent, Brad Devine, said, “Trent has had a number of teams showing interest. At this time, he has not made a decision on where he is going to play next year.”

There is a lot to read between those two sentences. Devine doesn’t address specifically whether the Ducks are among those teams interested but his statement also didn’t rule that out. Also, the teams he speaks of could also include those overseas in addition to any from the NHL.

Hunter in his past few seasons has been a bit disappointing. He’s seen his point totals decline in each of the last four seasons and his second season in the league back in 2003-2004 still remains his career-best season as he scored 25 goals and had 51 points. Since he had 41 points four seasons ago, he’s been unable to stay healthy and his production has declined. Last season he tore his MCL and played in just 17 games.

With declining production and coming off a bad injury, the chances of landing a good contract and seeing a heft amount of playing time are thin. Of course, if Selanne retires in Anaheim and the Ducks are in search of instant NHL-experienced right winger, Hunter could fit the bill. Counting on him to be anything more than a checking line forward would be a mistake, especially when he’s got his own health issues and could wind up a liability.

At his size (6’3″ 211 pounds), Hunter could fit in well with what the Ducks need on their right side. Once again though, Selanne’s decision will be the one that perhaps sets the wheels in motion for Ducks GM Bob Murray. That said, Murray would be better served by being proactive instead of reactive.

Avs unveil new third jerseys

Avs Jerseys

The Avalanche will be throwing a bunch of different looks at us this season.

Having already released specialized “Mile High” jerseys for February’s Stadium Series game, the Avs unveiled new third sweaters on Friday — less than 24 hours after a bitter 5-4 home loss to Minnesota in their season opener.

(Guess Colorado wanted to send out some good vibes after blowing a 4-1 third-period lead.)

While undoubtedly exciting for the organization, the release of these new thirds isn’t taking anybody by surprise. Last month, several websites published leaked images of Colorado’s and Anaheim’s third jerseys, so the design has been in the public eye for several weeks.

The Avs will debut these new thirds on Oct. 24, in a Saturday night tilt against Columbus.

Related: Roy explains why he didn’t call time out

Report: Escrow set at 16 percent

Gary Bettman, Donald Fehr
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Hey, remember in June when the NHLPA voted to keep the five-percent growth factor in spite of increasing worries about escrow?

Well, here’s why that decision was a significant one, via TSN’s Frank Seravalli:

With early revenue projections in place, the NHL and NHLPA set the escrow withholding rate for players at 16 per cent for the first quarter of the season on Thursday.

That means every player will have 16 per cent of earnings deducted from their paycheque and put aside until after all of this season’s hockey-related revenue is counted to ensure a perfect 50-50 revenue split with owners.

Now, this doesn’t mean that the players will definitely lose 16 percent of their salaries. Typically, they receive refunds when all the accounting is done.

Still, 16 percent is a good-sized chunk to withhold. They won’t be thrilled about it.

Related: To understand escrow, consider Duncan Keith