Claude Giroux

The NHL’s best bargain contracts: Atlantic Division


The hockey world tends to focus on the most regrettable contracts rather than the best ones because let’s face it: it’s more enjoyable to make fun of Brian Campbell’s deal than to linger on Dustin Brown’s bargain contract. That being said, clever GMs deserve credit for either finding the right timing to sign a player, judging their value better than most or simply fostering a climate in which a player will take a pay cut. This series of posts will take a look at every team to see which (if any) players deserve to be called bargains.

Notes: entry-level deals don’t count because they have built-in maximum levels. “Loophole” contracts will be considered, but they won’t receive as much consideration because of their inherent salary cap dishonesty. Bought out players will be considered for their current cap hits.

New Jersey Devils – Zach Parise’s previous cap hit ($3.1M) was a true stroke of genius, but their current roster lacks many smart contracts. There was a point in which Martin Brodeur’s $5.2 million cap hit was a minor bargain considering his prestige, but it’s been a while since he’s been worth anywhere near that much.

Travis Zajac ($3.88M) – Could put up bonkers numbers on the Devils’ top line.

source: Getty ImagesNew York Islanders – A young team with some nice steals and a few embarrassing albatrosses.

Matt Moulson ($3.13M) – Moulson’s deal is a borderline bargain, but he has two straight 30+ goal seasons to his credit. There’s a good chance he’ll maintain that pace, so that’s a solid value for the Isles.

Frans Nielsen ($525K) – Nielsen generated some dark horse buzz for the Selke Trophy, yet he’s basically a minimum wage player. His bargain deal will run out after next season, so it will be interesting to see how long he’ll be underpaid. He’s one of the league’s biggest steals right now, though.

Evgeni Nabokov ($570K) – I’ve gone on record of saying that the Isles would get the most out of him if they simply let him be their top goalie, but even if they only get a little bit of a return via the trade route, he’s still a steal. Sure, his contract is funky because it was only originally meant to cover a few months, but it still counts.

Rick DiPietro ($4.5M) – Just kidding.

Honorable mentions: Michael Grabner (we’ll see if he’s a one-hit wonder), Mark Streit (big steal if health permits) and Al Montoya ($600K would be cheap if he is their full-time starter).

source: Getty ImagesNew York Rangers – Glen Sather’s been embarrassing himself with far less regularity lately.

Ryan Callahan ($4.27M) and Brandon Dubinsky ($4.2M) – They’re not the bargains they once were, but could be well-worth the money if their scoring numbers match their intensity for the length of their new contracts.

Marc Staal ($3.98M) – Not a bad price at all considering his importance to the Rangers’ defense.

Honorable mentions: Sean Avery (could actually be worth the trouble if he lines up with Brad Richards and Marian Gaborik) and Brian Boyle (a nice bargain if his 21-goal year wasn’t a fluke).

Philadelphia Flyers – They basically got rid of some of their best bargains during the off-season, but do they still have a few steals on their roster?

Claude Giroux ($3.75M) – Even if Giroux might get exposed now that they’re counting on him a lot more than before, he’s still a big-time bargain at this price. The best part is that his outstanding value won’t run out until after the 2014-15 season.

Braydon Coburn ($3.2M) – Not a bad deal for a pretty talented (if easily forgotten) defenseman. The Flyers pay a lot for their defensive corps overall, though.

Honorable mention: Jakub Voracek (could be the next Ville Leino) and Wayne Simmonds (might not score much, but could play the role that Dan Carcillo was too much of a knucklehead to ever pull off).

source: Getty ImagesPittsburgh Penguins – A well-run organization that might kick themselves for signing most of their deals before all the loophole contracts started filtering through.

James Neal ($2.88M) – This choice is a leap of faith based on the kind of numbers he could put up skating alongside Sidney Crosby or Evgeni Malkin.

Kris Letang ($3.5M) – His numbers plummeted after Crosby and Malkin were out, but he’s a high-scoring blueliner when those two are healthy. It’s tough to argue with Letang at $2 million less than what Sergei Gonchar is making.

Honorable mentions: Jordan Staal (it’s tough to believe that his cap hit is evolving into a small bargain) and Brent Johnson (a cheap, dependable backup).


Feel free to point out any glaring omissions or faulty inclusions. Again, remember: players on their entry-level deals don’t count so that’s why you won’t see the James van Riemsdyks of the world.

Struggling Sabre Tyler Ennis out with upper-body injury

Tyler Ennis, James Wisniewski
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Tyler Ennis can probably relate with the Buffalo Sabres’ opponent on Wednesday, as he’s struggling almost as much as the Nashville Predators.

Perhaps some of that has to do with health?

Whether that’s the case or not, Ennis is out for the Sabres tonight, as the team announced that he’s dealing with an upper-body injury.

The Buffalo News discussed Ennis’ struggles in this article.

“I’d say he’s pressing too much. You can’t make those plays in every situation and in every point you touch the puck,” Dan Bylsma said to the Buffalo News. “ … He’s just got to simplify his game. He is a special player who can make those plays, but he can’t be trying to do it every time he touches the puck.”

He’ll need to wait a while to start getting things together, anyway.

WATCH LIVE: Wednesday Night Rivalry (Flyers-Islanders; Blackhawks-Sharks)

Ryan White, Matt Martin
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You can check out tonight’s Wednesday Night Rivalry doubleheader on NBCSN, and you can also stream them online.

Here are the handy links for the two contests.

First, the New York Islanders host the Philadelphia Flyers.


After that, the Chicago Blackhawks visit the San Jose Sharks.


Braun out with upper-body injury; Zubrus to make Sharks debut

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The San Jose Sharks will be missing a top-4 defenseman tonight when they host the defending champs from Chicago.

Justin Braun has an upper-body injury. His status is considered day-to-day.

“Brauny has been one of our unsung heroes here through the first quarter of the season,” coach Peter DeBoer told CSN Bay Area. “He’s played some outstanding hockey. So, we’re going to miss him, but it’s a great opportunity for Mueller and Tennyson and one of these guys to establish themselves. It’s a great opportunity for us to reward Dillon for how well he’s played.”

Against the Blackhawks, Brenden Dillon will take Braun’s spot on the top pairing alongside Marc-Edouard Vlasic; Paul Martin and Brent Burns will stay together on the second pairing; and 20-year-old Mirco Mueller will skate with Matt Tennyson.

Mueller has played just four games for the Sharks this season. In his last game, Thursday in Philadelphia, he received only 9:13 of ice time.

Also tonight, new Shark forward Dainius Zubrus is expected to debut on the fourth line.

Related: Sharks sign Zubrus, because DeBoer

Johansen calls trade rumblings ‘weird,’ says relationship with Torts is ‘great’

Ryan Johansen
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One day after reports surfaced of Ryan Johansen being at the center of trade talks, all parties involved from Columbus did what they’re supposed to do — downplay the situation.

You can read the denials in full over at the Dispatch, but here’s the gist:

— Johansen said the rumors were “weird” and that he’s “never seen it before.” He also said there were no issues between him and head coach John Tortorella, calling the relationship “great.”

— GM Jarmo Kekalainen wouldn’t address the report, nor would Johansen’s agent, Kurt Overhardt.

— Johansen added he hasn’t spoken to any of Columbus’ management about the trade rumblings.

So there’s that. What’s next?

At this stage of the game, it’s hard not to think about another Overhardt client, Kyle Turris.

Turris, you’ll recall, spent four (mostly) stormy years with the Coyotes before his trade out to Ottawa was orchestrated. Turris eventually told GM Don Maloney “this is not going to work out” with the club, and he was gone.

So, consider the similarities now:

— Turris was 22 at the time of the trade, with four years and 137 games under his belt.

— Johansen is 23, with five years and 291 games.

— Both had contentious contract holdouts with their respective clubs.

— Both are Overhardt guys.

— The Turris trade happened after the Coyotes went from Wayne Gretzky to Dave Tippett as head coach.

— Johansen is already on his third head coach (Scott Arniel, Todd Richards, Tortorella).

For now, these are all coincidences (or a forced narrative, depending what you think of the author).

And, of course, the one big — big — difference between the two is that, at the time of his trade, Turris wasn’t as good or established a player as Johansen currently is. Therefore, logic suggests any Johansen trade would be a lot more blockbuster-y and, therefore, probably more complex.

And as we know, complex deals aren’t easy to pull off.