Vancouver Canucks v Boston Bruins - Game Three

The NHL’s best bargain contracts: Northeast Division

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The hockey world tends to focus on the most regrettable contracts rather than the best ones because let’s face it: it’s more enjoyable to make fun of Brian Campbell‘s deal than to linger on Dustin Brown‘s bargain contract. That being said, clever GMs deserve credit for either finding the right timing to sign a player, judging their value better than most or simply fostering a climate in which a player will take a pay cut. This series of posts will take a look at every team to see which (if any) players deserve to be called bargains.

Notes: entry-level deals don’t count because they have built-in maximum levels. “Loophole” contracts will be considered, but they won’t receive as much consideration because of their inherent salary cap dishonesty. Bought out players will be considered for their current cap hits. I also think $6 million is a reasonable – if arbitrary – cutoff point for a true bargain player.

Boston Bruins – The defending Stanley Cup champions are, for the most part, quite nicely constructed.

David Krejci ($3.75M) – I keep beating on this drum, but not enough has been made about Krejci being the leading scorer of the 2011 playoffs. In fact, let me ask: did you know that he was the top scorer of the postseason? (Be honest.)

source: Getty ImagesRich Peverley ($1.33M) – He looked pretty fantastic in the playoffs and should score around 20 goals next season.

David Seidenberg ($3.25M) – “The Pain Sponge” seemed overpaid until the playoffs, when he rarely looked out of place alongside Zdeno Chara on Boston’s top pairing.

Tim Thomas ($5M) – I won’t call many – if any – other goalies in Thomas’ price range a steal, but he was the best goalie in the world last season and one could make a reasonable argument that he had the best season of any NHLer, period.

Tuukka Rask ($1.25M) – Then again, if Thomas falters, his backup carried the load in 2009-10. Rask is expensive for a backup but could also have some great trade value if Boston goes that route (I wouldn’t, though).

Honorable mention: Patrice Bergeron is really good, but $5 million actually seems about right for him.

Buffalo Sabres – Are there any reasonable contracts left after Pegulamania ran wild during the off-season?

Derek Roy ($4M) – If Roy is over his injuries, he’ll go back to what he was before: a fantastic bargain for a point-per-game player.

Honorable mentions: Christian Ehrhoff’s cap hit is actually pretty cheap while Robyn Regehr could be a nice value as a shutdown defenseman, too.

source: APMontreal Canadiens – Don’t forget, Montreal didn’t sign Scott Gomez to his ludicrous contract. They actually traded for it years later, which is actually way worse.

Josh Gorges ($2.5M) – Gorges has been a surprisingly effective defensive player since going from San Jose to Montreal.

Carey Price ($2.75M) – I must admit, I didn’t expect Price to actually back up all of the hype last season. He was impressive and has the motivation of a contract year next season, which makes me think that Montreal will get a lot of value out of his two-year deal. Things might get fishy if he gets a big raise afterward, though.

Honorable mention: Max Pacioretty had 24 points in 37 games, which is a promising pace for a player as cheap as he is. He might be a steal if he can bounce back from THE HIT.

Ottawa Senators – Could this oddball team actually have some bargain deals?

Bobby Butler ($1.05M) – He has the potential to be a respectable scorer for the Senators and he’s really cheap. Plus there weren’t a whole lot of other options beyond Nick Foligno and … yeah that’s about it.

Honorable mentions: Daniel Alfredsson could be a bargain if he’s healthy and has enough left in the tank. I really like Craig Anderson, but I’m not crazy about his contract.

source: APToronto Maple Leafs – It seems like Brian Burke is starting to resemble the old Burkie again – before he seemed like Glen Sather in Burke’s clothing.

Mikhail Grabovski ($2.9M) and Nikolai Kulemin ($2.35M) – I’m skeptical that the Grabovski-Kulemin-Clarke MacArthur line will match their 2010-11 outputs, but the Maple Leafs would get a lot of value out of Grabovski and Kulemin if they did.

James Reimer ($1.8M) – Speaking of skepticism about repeated success, I have some concern that Reimer might be a one-hit wonder. Still, that one-hit was quite the top-tapper; he managed an impressive .920 save percentage in 37 games, which is enough of a sample to at least make the Leafs’ hopes reasonable. If he maintains something close to that level, then Toronto has a huge bargain contract for three seasons.


Feel free to point out any glaring omissions or faulty inclusions. Again, remember: players on their entry-level deals don’t count, so that’s why you won’t see the P.K. Subbans of the world.

Click here for the Atlantic Division version.

Click here for the Central Division version.

Lightning lament life as a .500 team

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The Tampa Bay Lightning have plenty of time to rise above mediocrity, yet it still must be deserving to finish at .500 for two straight months.

After last night’s 3-2 loss to the New York Islanders, that’s exactly where they find themselves:

Record at the end of October: 5-5-2

Record at the end of November: 11-11-3

As of this writing, the Lightning found themselves on the outside looking in at the playoff picture. It all stands as a pretty tough thing for the reigning Eastern Conference champs to swallow.

The uncomfortable-yet-vital question is: can the Lightning break out of this funk?

Looking at their schedule, it won’t be easy, at least not right away.

They crawl through California during a three-game road trip to start December, and they also face six of eight on the road from Dec. 2 – 18.

The Lightning soak up home dates to finish 2015 after that, but what damage will be done by then?

Frankly, the Bolts will need to dig deep to break this pattern. If nothing else, they’ve fought with their backs against the wall before.

Dubinsky won’t change, and he won’t go easy on Crosby


Sometimes a suspension will shame a player, or at least inspire him to change the way he plays.

That apparently won’t happen regarding Brandon Dubinsky‘s one-game timeout session for cross-checking Sidney Crosby.

Dubinsky told Aaron Portzline of the Columbus Dispatch that he won’t alter his style, whether it’s against Crosby or someone else.

“Nope,” Dubinsky said. “You know, I’ve played the same way my whole career and I’m not going to change. The next time I have an opportunity to play (Crosby), I’m going to play him hard.”

In case you’re wondering, that next opportunity comes on Dec. 21 in Pittsburgh, assuming that both players are healthy and not suspended.

One can understand Dubinsky’s perspective, although such honesty would be that much more interesting if there’s another incident with Crosby. His initial reaction to the hit was interestingly candid, admitting that his “stick rode up” on his adversary.

Would that stance – which, from a harsher view, might seem flippant to Dubinsky’s critics – open the door for a bigger future bit of a discipline?

Maybe, maybe not … but at least his comments aren’t as inflammatory as what John Tortorella said (at least on the record).

Bad news for Boedker: Coyotes won’t face Sens again in 2015-16


Sorry Mikkel Boedker, you won’t get to face the Ottawa Senators again this season.

OK, it could happen if the speedster is traded from the Arizona Coyotes. He could also face the Senators in the unlikely instance that the two teams fight it out in the 2016 Stanley Cup Final.

Beyond those two possibilities, Saturday night was it, and Boedker must have been licking his chops much like an actual coyote.

For the second straight game, Boedker managed a hat trick against the Senators, helping Arizona beat Ottawa 4-3 last night. His third tally stood as the game-winner in a 4-3 victory.

You can watch all three goals in the video above.

It’s oddly fitting that Boedker has three goals this season … against teams not named the Ottawa Senators.

Hey, Tortorella called the Penguins whiners again

John Tortorella

Don’t forget, the Blue Jackets – Penguins rivalry isn’t just about the bitterness between Sidney Crosby and Brandon Dubinsky; John Tortorella can fuel the fire, too.

Torts must not have been happy about the one-game suspension that Dubinsky received for cross-checking Crosby, as he channeled his vintage self in essentially calling the Penguins a bunch of whiners.

You can see from this glorious Sportsnet video, Tortorella said: “Pittsburgh whines enough for the whole league.”

(He also said the Blue Jackets weren’t going to whine by … whining. Good stuff.)

As Puck Daddy notes, this isn’t the first time Torts claimed that the Penguins are whiners.

Both the Blue Jackets and Penguins lost their games on Saturday, but clearly some eyes and ears were still focused on their last confrontation.

In case you’re wondering, the two teams next face off in Pittsburgh on Dec. 21.