More updates on Coyotes and Stars sales

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It seems like each of the ownership situations pending around the NHL are destined to be dragged out as long as possible. The Atlanta Thrashers sale and relocation moved remarkably quickly—unfortunately the situations in Dallas, St. Louis, and Glendale aren’t going down quite as smoothly. Everyday there seems to be a new update, wrinkle, potential problem, or cause for hope while fans in each city eagerly await their team’s future to be settled. Today, there was news that affects all three cities and their sale process: but still nothing pending for the immediate future.

In Glendale, there’s news that there are two buyers that are interested in submitting offers for the team to the Glendale City Council when they reconvene in a few weeks. That much we already knew. It’s already been widely assumed that one of the mystery groups is led by Jerry Reinsdorf (of course). Now there’s word that both offers will come fully equipped with opt-out clauses to protect any future owner as part of the sale.

Why is this news? In the past, members of the Glendale City Council have been adamantly opposed to any offers that included an opt-out clause. From their position, they’re afraid of giving government subsides only to see an out-of-town businessman bolt at the first sign of trouble. If they’re going to make a deal, they want assurances that the team will be in Glendale for the long-haul. Their position is completely understandable. Then again, it’s also understandable that any businessman would want to protect his interests in the event that things go sideways.

The folks over at Five For Howling must be getting sick of the never-ending ownership/sale mess surrounding their team, but at least Jordan Ellel is taking a pragmatic look at the newest development and the reality of a potential out-clause:

“No, as much as I would love for a potential owner to swoop in and make a guarantee that the team would stay for the entire 30-year lease term (a la Hulsizer), an out clause is completely reasonable at this stage. The fans have shied away for a variety of reasons, but if an owner steps in and gives a time frame for turning things around and this city cannot do it; well, then the team should probably move to be frank.

However, so long as the ownership group isn’t the cheapest group known to man, the team should remain very competitive and a good value for your entertainment dollars. Given a modicum of quality marketing and continued improvement obtaining local sponsors, then meeting whatever “growth” metrics will be used to trigger an out clause should not be an issue. Of course, we all know how fickle Phoenix fans can be and true growth will only happen if they make a playoff run that doesn’t end in seven or fewer games (and hey, if the NBA stays locked out that will only help as well).”

It’s hard to disagree with the logic. If the team is given a new owner that shows a reasonable amount of commitment and the fans still don’t show up to Arena, then it’s on the fans—not the owner.

One thousand miles to the east, the Dallas Stars are dealing with their ownership situation. Slowly but surely, Tom Gaglardi is continuing in his process to buy the Stars from the various creditors who currently hold debts. Mike Heika of the Dallas Morning News gives an update:

“Which brings us to Gaglardi, and where his bid is. Several people I have talked to said he is in New York trying to push through all of the paperwork that needs to be pushed through, and this is a difficult time to do that. In addition to lawyers, there also are financial people involved in drawing up loans, and this is a volatile time in the financial market.”

If everything goes to plan, Gaglardi’s bid will go through and the offer will be seen by a judge in bankruptcy court. There had been reports that two of the groups that were interested in buying the Dallas Stars were now throwing their name into the hat for the St. Louis Blues—which may still be true. However, any assumptions that Gaglardi was hedging his bets and negotiating a deal with for the Blues behind the scenes should be put to rest immediately. Put simply: Gaglardi isn’t interested in the Blues.

Neither circumstance is even remotely close to conclusion. Today’s events are simply the next step in situations that have plenty of moving parts. One day they’ll both be done and we can go back to talking about the actual teams that reside in Dallas and Arizona.

“We beat this thing”: Eddie Olczyk declares he’s cancer-free

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It’s the news every hockey fan wanted to hear.

On Thursday night’s Chicago Blackhawks broadcast on NBC Sports Chicago, Eddie Olczyk, who was diagnosed last summer with colon cancer, told the hockey world some great news.

“I got the call on March 14 at 5:07 p.m. letting me know my scans were clear,” an emotional Olczyk said as he stood next to long-time broadcast partner Pat Foley. “I’ve never heard a better phrase in my life. I’m now 10 days on with the rest of my life.”

Olczyk, 51, had surgery after his diagnosis and had his last chemotherapy treatment on Feb. 21.

“All the cancer is gone – we beat this thing,” Olczyk said, thanking a handful of people, from colleagues at NBC to the Chicago Blackhawks and the NHL to his family members, wife and four kids. “And I say ‘we’ because it has been a team effort. We all beat this and I’m so thankful for all the support and prayers. They worked. I’m proud to stand here before everybody and say we beat this thing.”

Foley called Olczyk’s battle with cancer, “heroic.”

Olczyk was scheduled to have a scan in April to see how his chemo treatments had gone, but that scan was moved up due to emergency hernia surgery, according to Mark Lazerus of the Chicago Sun-Times.

“I’ve had enough crying to last me a lifetime,” Olczyk said. “I can’t emphasize enough just the support out there… just the texts, the email, the letters. I’ve received thousands and thousands of mail. I won’t be able to thank everybody, but I just want everybody to know on behalf of Eddie Olczyk and his family, we’re forever grateful for the support and the prayers and well wishes we received over the past seven months.”

Olczyk said one thing he realized through his battle is that he found out he was way tougher than he thought he ever was.

“If I can inspire one person to stay away from this, then I guess it was well worth it going through it,” he said.

Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Grubauer, Capitals shut out Red Wings

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If you were looking for a barn-burner, this game wasn’t that.

While the Tampa Bay Lightning and New York Islanders combined for 13 goals, and the Carolina Hurricanes and Arizona Coyotes scored 11 in total, the Washington Capitals and their hosts, the Detroit Red Wings, played 60 minutes with just one goal between them.

It wasn’t nearly as exciting in the goal-scoring department, but the win for the Washington Capitals put a bit of separation between themselves and the Pittsburgh Penguins and Columbus Blue Jackets, who the Caps (93 points) lead by four points now.

Brett Conolly’s third-period marker at 6:41 was all the Capitals needed for their

Andreas Athanasiou appeared to make it 1-0 in the first period on a nice wrister, but a goaltender interference challenge by Washington was successful after Tyler Bertuzzi was judged to have made contact with Grubauer. This one was pretty cut and dry, as far as GI calls go.

The loss for the Red Wings meant they were officially eliminated from playoff contention, something that had been known for a while but hadn’t happened in the mathematical department.

Grubauer was solid, making 39 saves for his third shutout of the season. At the other end of the rink, Jimmy Howard wasn’t too shabby either, stopping 25-of-26. All he needed was a bit of run support.

Prior to puck drop, the Red Wings announced that defenseman Mike Green, who was hampered by a neck injury back in February, will go under the knife, ending his season.

Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

WATCH LIVE: Vegas Golden Knights at San Jose Sharks

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[Puck drop at 10 p.m. ET, CLICK HERE TO WATCH LIVE]


Golden Knights

Jonathan MarchessaultWilliam KarlssonTomas Tatar

David PerronErik HaulaJames Neal

Ryan CarpenterCody EakinAlex Tuch

Tomas NosekPierre-Edouard BellemareRyan Reaves

Brayden McNabbNate Schmidt

Shea TheodoreDeryk Engelland

Jon MerrillColin Miller

Starting goalie: Malcolm Subban

[Golden Knights – Sharks preview]


Evander KaneJoe PavelskiMelker Karlsson

Tomas HertlLogan CoutureMikkel Boedker

Timo MeierChris TierneyKevin Labanc

Barclay GoodrowEric FehrJannik Hansen

Marc-Edouard VlasicJustin Braun

Paul MartinBrent Burns

Brenden DillonDylan DeMelo

Starting goalie: Martin Jones

Cam Ward delivers an all-time own goal (video)

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We’ve seen some pretty interesting own goals throughout NHL history, and now Cam Ward has staked his claim for one of the strangest.

The Carolina Hurricanes goaltender scored on himself in one of the most bizarre plays ever seen in the NHL.

The puck, as you can see, hops into the skate of an unknowing Ward as the veteran netminder went out to play a puck that was rimmed around the boards.

Ward, does what he would normally do after trotting out behind his net, and gets back into his crease. Unsure of where the puck is, he drops into the butterfly. The problem is the puck is stuck in his right skate, which goes over the goal line.

It’s hard to explain, so let’s roll the footage:

The play-by-play man on Fox Sports Carolinas had a good point: Why wasn’t the play blown dead? Even if the ref has his eye on the puck, there was no way of Ward knowing what he was about to do.

Is there even a rule for that?

Either way, one of the strangest goals in recent memory counted in a game few were probably watching to begin with.

It’s probably safe to assume Ward (and goalies around the NHL) are going to find some way as to not let that happen again.

Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck