Best and worst sweaters of all-time: Tampa Bay Lightning

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It can be tricky being an expansion franchise and trying to carve out an identity in the league. It can be even harder when you’re doing it as a hockey team in Florida. The Lightning were able to break stereotypes about hockey in the south and be successful. Funny they were able to do it while always changing a little something up about their look all the time.

Best: The Lightning have been a franchise always in search of a complete look. While their sweaters have all been essentially the same thing since their inception in the early 90s, there’s always been some kind of tweak going on. Whether it was with the numbers, the letters, or both, things were always changing.

That said, they got it right in 2001 when they stuck with what worked with their crest and shoulder logo and gave up on being different with everything else and stuck to block letters and numbers. Their black road sweater that served them well between 2001 and 2007 proved to be their best. The one odd touch with any of their black and white sweaters came thanks to the “victory stripes” located in the armpits of the sweater. Team founder Phil Esposito said that when the team lifted the Stanley Cup they’d get to see the team colors then. They sure got to do that in 2004 when Dave Andreychuk, Vincent Lecavalier, and Martin St. Louis led the team to their one and only Stanley Cup.

Worst: Boy oh boy could teams not get their third sweaters right. The Lightning sought out to really hammer home their location on Tampa Bay and the fact their team was named after a naturally occurring event. From 1996 to 1999 the Lightning’s third jersey had lightning bolts coming down the sleeves out of a grotesque storm cloud-like gray shoulder yoke with the Lightning crest big and bold on the front over top of what was a rocky storm at sea landscape. This sounds as if I’m describing a terrible painting and… Yes, that’s precisely what this sweater was. A terrible, awful, dumb painting.

Black or blue?: When the Lightning introduced a new third jersey during the RBK Edge era, they opted to take advantage of the other main team color they had. They created a bright, bold blue sweater that put the Lightning’s revamped Reebok logo on the shoulders and spelled out “BOLTS” diagonally on the front while slipping a small “Tampa Bay” on the rear bottom flap of the sweater. With the Lightning switching to an entirely new logo and look this season, it ends the era of black sweaters in Tampa, one that did them well through their first 19 seasons in Florida. Perhaps that means someday we’ll be treated to a “new” black alternate sweater in the future.

Assessment: The Lightning’s new look is bold but I’ll reserve total judgment on it until I see it in action on the ice. The new logo looks like something out of a futuristic sports video game and the amount of blue that’s seen in the home and road sweaters is staggering. Leaving the color black behind in such a cold turkey kind of way will take some adjusting to. That said, it’s a modernized old school kind of look and one for Steve Stamkos to embrace as the future of the franchise.

PHT Morning Skate: Norway gets first Olympic win since ’94; What should Jackets do at deadline?

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Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.com.

• Ryan Donato keeps scored big goals for Team USA with his father in attendance. (NBC Olympics)

• Norway’s win over Slovenia was their first victory since the 1994 Olympic Games. (NBC Olympics)

• Team USA took down Slovakia, which means they have a date with the Czech Republic in the quarters. (NBC Olympics)

Be sure to visit NBCOlympics.com and NBC Olympic Talk for full hockey coverage from PyeongChang.

• The approach the Blue Jackets take a the upcoming trade deadline could impact what happens to Sergei Bobrovsky, Artemi Panarin and Zach Werenski. Jarmo Kekalainen (The Cannon)

• By calling up prospect Oskar Lindblom and trading for Petr Mrazek, Flyers GM Ron Hextall has put his team in a good spot. (Sons of Penn)

• Speaking of last night’s trade, TSN’s Frank Seravalli believes it’s a low-risk bet for the Flyers. (TSN.ca)

• Flames defenseman Travis Hamnonic hit the 500-game mark of his NHL career this week. And as he explained, he has a great support system around him. (Calgary Sun)

• Pucks and Pitchforks takes a look at the New Jersey Devils’ goalie situation by breaking down some advanced stats. (Pucks and Pitchforks)

• The Rangers haven’t made any moves yet, but a storm is on its way. (Blue Seat Blogs)

Harri Sateri held his own while Roberto Luongo and James Reimer were injured. (The Rat Trick)

• Mile High Hockey outlines the Colorado Avalanche’s objectives at the upcoming trade deadline. (Mile High Hockey)

• Predators top prospect Eeli Tolvanen has been nothing short of incredible at the Olympics. Is a move to NHL next? (Predlines)

 

Joey Alfieri is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @joeyalfieri.

The Buzzer: Tuukka Time isn’t running out

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Be sure to visit NBCOlympics.com and NBC Olympic Talk for full hockey coverage from PyeongChang

Players of the Night:

Tuukka Rask, Boston Bruins: Remember when people thought Tuukka Time was running out? Rask stopped 28-of-29 against the Flames in a 2-1 overtime win for the Bruins on Monday. Rask, according to Sportsnet Stats, is now 20-2-2 with a 1.83 goals-against average, a .933 save percentage and two shutouts in his last 25 games, 24 of which has been starts.

Pekka Rinne, Nashville Predators: Rinne stopped 36-of-38 to help the Predators back into a tie first place in the Central Division. Rinne, who has won three of his past four starts, picked up his 30th win of the season, the seventh time he’s done so in his career, and fourth season in a row.

Jason Zucker, Minnesota Wild: Zucker notched two tallies in the game, his second and third goals in his past two games, to help the Wild to a much-needed win after dropping their previous two contests.

John Gibson and Ryan Miller, Anaheim Ducks: Gibson left after the second period with a lower-body injury. He made 13 saves. Miller came in for a relief stint and stopped 20 third-period shots for the rare combined shutout, just the second occurrence in team history.

Highlights of the Night:

Poor Erik Karlsson:

Brad Marchand uses his head for some good:

The Chronicles of Rittich:

Factoids of the Night:

MISC:

Scores:

Wild 5, Islanders 3

Capitals 3, Sabres 2

Bruins 2, Flames 1 (OT)

Predators 5, Senators 2

Kings 3, Blackhawks 1

Ducks 2, Golden Knights 0


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

U.S. beats Slovakia 5-1, will play Czechs in Olympic quarters

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GANGNEUNG, South Korea (AP) — Ryan Donato scored two goals, Troy Terry had three assists and the United States beat Slovakia 5-1 in the qualification round Tuesday to advance to face the Czech Republic in the Olympic quarterfinals.

College kids again led the way for the U.S., which scored more against Slovakia then it did in all three preliminary-round games. James Wisniewski, Mark Arcobello and Garrett Roe also scored for the Americans, who took advantage of a 5-on-3 power play for hits on Donato and goaltender Ryan Zapolski.

Shaking off a collision with Ladislav Nagy, Ryan Zapolski had arguably his best game of the tournament, stopping 21 of the 22 shots he faced. Zapolski and the U.S. also beat Slovakia 2-1 in the preliminary round when Donato scored twice. With his second two-goal game, Donato equaled his father, Ted, who scored four goals for the U.S. at the 1992 Games in Albertville.

Slovakia goaltender Jan Laco allowed five goals on 33 shots and Peter Ceresnak scored a power-play goal for Slovakia, which became the first team eliminated from the men’s side.

After a listless first period with no goals and few scoring chances, the U.S. wasted little time getting on the board early in the second. Terry, as he has done all Olympics, used his speed to get to the net, and Donato picked up the loose puck and beat Laco 1:36 into the period.

The Americans got not one but two scares 26 seconds later when Nagy ran over Zapolski and Slovakia defenseman Michal Cajovsky put a shoulder into Donato’s head in the neutral zone. Trainers attended to Donato and Zapolski as backup goaltender Brandon Maxwell stretched and prepared to go in.

Donato got stitched up on the bench and Zapolski took a few minutes before deciding not to leave the net. The ’90s hit ”Tubthumping” by Chumbawamba blared over the speakers when both players got to their feet and provided a fitting soundtrack for the next few minutes.

With Cajovsky given a match penalty – a five-minute major and an ejection – and Nagy in the penalty box for goaltender interference, the U.S. scored 18 seconds into its 5-on-3 power play with Donato screening Laco for Wisniewski’s first goal to make it 2-0 at the 2:20 mark. Terry took advantage of all the time in the world behind the net and found an open Arcobello for a one-timer to put the U.S. up 3-0 at 13:30.

After Jordan Greenway was penalized for slashing, Slovakia scored on the power play 16:54 into the second to cut it to 3-1, but the lightning-fast line of Roe, Brian O’Neill and Broc Little combined for a tic-tac-toe goal to make it 4-1 at 9:52 of the third. O’Neill flashed his speed down the right wing, took a hit while making the pass to Little who found Roe for a tap-in.

Donato scored his second of the game, this time on the power play, 16:46 into the third.

NOTES: St. Cloud State defenseman Will Borgen was a healthy scratch again for the United States. … Veteran forward Jim Slater returned to the lineup, replacing Chad Kolarik. … Former NHL player and coach Craig Ramsay coaches Slovakia.

Follow Hockey Writer Stephen Whyno on Twitter at https://twitter.com/SWhyno

Be sure to visit NBCOlympics.com and NBC Olympic Talk for full hockey coverage from PyeongChang.

Desperate for goaltending help, Flyers acquire Petr Mrazek

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The deal: The Philadelphia Flyers acquired goaltender Petr Mrazek from the Detroit Red Wings for a conditional fourth-round pick in the 2018 NHL Entry Draft and a conditional third-round pick in the 2019 NHL Entry Draft.

Why is Philadelphia is making this deal? Simple: With the injuries to Brian Elliott (out five-to-six weeks with a core muscle injury) and Michal Neuvirth (out indefinitely with a lower-body injury), the Flyers had Alex Lyon, a veteran of just four NHL games, left to shoulder the load. Philly needed help after Neuvirth went down on Sunday and they went out and got it in 25-year-old Mrazek. The Flyers are currently third in the Metropolitan Division. Even with their six-point cushion from the second wildcard spot, relying on a rookie to see out the rest of the regular season could have been met with disastrous consequences.

Why is Detroit is making this deal? Sam Carchidi of Philly.com said Flyers general manager Ron Hextall had spoken with the Red Wings about Mrazek prior to Neuvirth’s injury, but the Detroit Free Press reported that the Flyers turned down a deal that would see a third-round pick go the other way. With the Red Wings being sellers, and with Hextall even more desperate for help after Sunday, he had no choice but to fold to Detroit’s demands.

Who won the trade? Pretty even. The Red Wings get a couple of picks over the next two years as they rebuild their team. The Flyers get immediate goaltending relief and perhaps an upgrade on the oft-injured Neuvirth. And Flyers fans will like that the team didn’t overpay to fix their problems. A good move from Hextall.


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck