Bruce Boudreau

Bruce Boudreau wants Caps to have best of both worlds offensively and defensively


When the Washington Capitals seemed to flip a switch last season and go from the high octane run-and-gun offensive juggernaut to a team that would lock you down defensively and win games 1-0 and 2-1, it was a startling shock for both Caps fans and teams around the NHL. After all, you go into a game that features offensive talents like Alex Ovechkin, Nicklas Backstrom, and Alexander Semin you think you’ll be flying up and down the ice trading offensive chances.

Instead, the Caps were able to play a smothering kind of defense that limited opportunities and kept the score down on both sides of the ice as the Caps offense had to adjust to their new brand of hockey. As they head into their second season under the new system led by coach Bruce Boudreau, the Capitals have a few new pieces to play with. Guys like Roman Hamrlik, Joel Ward, and Troy Brouwer bring more of the blue collar gamesmanship to the squad but Boudreau wants a little more.

Tarik El-Bashir of The Washington Post hears from Boudreau that while he likes the commitment to defense, he wants more goals and would love to have the best of both worlds.

“I’m hoping that we can be a hybrid,” Boudreau said. “There’s some parts we changed [last season] that I really loved. But when you’re playing like that, you have score a lot of goals dump-ins and you have to score a lot of goals off the forecheck because the quick-break isn’t there. I’d like to get back to being more of a quick-break team.”

Boudreau would not delve into the specifics of positioning and the responsibilities of individual players in the new system. But he also made it clear that he doesn’t want them to revert to the Caps of 2009-10, with forwards routinely gliding back, or camping out in the neutral zone while the puck is deep in Washington’s end, or more important, feeling that defensive-zone coverage isn’t in their job description.

“I’d like to be a quick-break team but not [have forwards] taking off, waiting at the blue line,” he said.

Getting that sort of attacking team can happen. Take a look at how teams like Vancouver, Chicago, and Detroit can stop on a dime and take a turnover and jet the other way to create offensive opportunities. Teams like that have been working their systems for many seasons, however, and their key components have been in place for years playing the same sort of hockey. If the Caps can get to that sort of level and become a quick strike team in the Eastern Conference with the weapons they have, it makes them all the more dangerous.

Pulling it off while still remaining committed to defense and not getting lost along the way will be the struggle for the Caps. The Caps have a lot of forward possibilities to play with in camp and juggling all these things are a tricky thing for a head coach to handle while also trying to do something new. Boudreau did well with it all last year, but if he can turn the Caps into a quick-strike defensive lockdown team, he might get that Stanley Cup that’s been eluding the Caps all these years.

Lucic: If I wanted to hurt Couture, ‘I would have hurt him’


Last night in Los Angeles, Kings forward Milan Lucic received a match penalty after skating the entire width of the ice to give San Jose’s Logan Couture a two-hand shove to the face.

Lucic didn’t hurt Couture, who had caught Lucic with an open-ice hit that Lucic didn’t like. Couture’s smiling, mocking face was good evidence that the Sharks’ forward was going to be OK.

This morning, Lucic was still in disbelief that he was penalized so harshly.

“I didn’t cross any line,” Lucic said, per Rich Hammond of the O.C. Register. “Believe me, if my intentions were to hurt him, I would have hurt him.”

While Lucic knew he deserved a penalty, he said after the game that he didn’t “know why it was called a match penalty.” His coach, Darryl Sutter, agreed, calling it “a borderline even roughing penalty.”

And though former NHL referee Kerry Fraser believes a match penalty was indeed warranted, Lucic said this morning that he hasn’t heard from the NHL about any possible supplemental discipline.

Nor for that matter has Dustin Brown, after his high hit on Couture in the first period.

In conclusion, it’s good to have hockey back.

Related: Sutter says Kings weren’t ‘interested’ in checking the Sharks

Torres apologizes to Silfverberg and Sharks


A statement from Raffi Torres:

“I accept the 41-game suspension handed down to me by the NHL’s Department of Player Safety. I worked extremely hard over the last two years following reconstructive knee surgery to resume my NHL career, and this is the last thing I wanted to happen. I am disappointed I have put myself in a position to be suspended again. I sincerely apologize to Jakob for the hit that led to this suspension, and I’m extremely thankful that he wasn’t seriously injured as a result of the play. I also want to apologize to my Sharks teammates and the organization.”

A statement from San Jose GM Doug Wilson:

“The Sharks organization fully supports the NHL’s supplementary discipline decision regarding Raffi. While we do not believe there was any malicious intent, this type of hit is unacceptable and has no place in our game. There is a difference between playing hard and crossing the line and there is no doubt, in this instance, Raffi crossed that line. We’re very thankful that Jakob was not seriously injured as a result of this play.”

Silfverberg says he expects to play Saturday when the Ducks open their regular season Saturday in San Jose.