Alexander Mogilny

Best and worst sweaters of all-time: Buffalo Sabres


Things got a bit ugly sweater-wise in Buffalo for a long time. Now with Terry Pegula in charge and owning the team, the Sabres throwback look is as apropos as it gets. Pegula-mania didn’t just save the Sabres from failure, it also saved everyone from seeing things get a bit too modernized with how the Sabres look on the ice.

Best: When the Sabres came to be in 1970, they arrived on the scene with a logo that became legendary in Buffalo and around the NHL for hockey fans all over. With the round logo with a charging buffalo and crisscrossing swords (sabers if you will) and a set of home and road jerseys that were perfect, it was the home whites from the mid-80s until the mid-90s that grabbed your attention the most.

With the blue and gold shoulder yoke with the Sabres logo on the shoulders on top of the big logo on the front, when you saw the Sabres at home, it was a thing of beauty, especially with Pat Lafontaine and Alexander Mogilny doing their thing. No offense to the French Connection line of the 70s, of course.

Worst: If you didn’t think I was going to use this to pick on the “Buffaslug” uniforms that came about after the 2004-2005 lockout, you’re crazy. Buffalo wanted to get back to wearing blue and gold again after their era of going red and black with the “snarling goat” buffalo head logo but wanted to do so with a modern design. Bad move.

The Sabres new logo was too silly and really easy to make fun of. The “Buffaslug” was born and while it looked more like a hairpiece for Barney Rubble, the uniforms were equally stupidly designed with waves of color streaking through it and the number on the upper front right side of the jersey. Call it what you will, but most of all it was a comedy of errors that stuck around for just four seasons before they went full on for the modernized throwback look thanks to massive outrage from the fans in Buffalo and across the league.

Dark Ages: The Sabres were another team to go all in on changing to black and while they saw their biggest success with the black and red re-design from 1996-2006 ultimately making the Stanley Cup finals in 1999 on the back of Dominik Hasek, it was a design that never really felt right. Sure selling merch in black and red was good for a short while in the 1990s, it was a look that never really fit the team. Sometimes following fashion trends isn’t the greatest idea around.

Assessment: The Sabres modernized throwbacks to their original look was a pleasant relief after the Buffaslug years. There’s nothing to really get worked up about with their new duds. Sure the number on the front of the jersey still looks awkward and the gray patches underneath the arms make it look like the players have a major sweating problem, but the overall look of the team is perfect.

The old logo with added gray highlights elsewhere on an old style yet modern jersey looks fantastic. With Terry Pegula owning the team now, the turn-back-the-clock style makes even more sense now as he’s perhaps the biggest Sabres fan around. Things work out for a reason sometimes.

Friday’s loss serves as ‘harsh lesson’ for Blue Jackets

Jasper Fast, Nick Foligno, Henrik Lundqvist
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Late in the third period of Friday’s game against the New York Rangers, things were looking good for Columbus.

Brandon Saad, who the team acquired from Chicago this off-season, scored his first goal of the season to give his team a 2-1 lead with under four minutes remaining in the contest.

Unfortunately for the Jackets, that’s as good as it would get.

The Rangers responded with three unanswered goals from Oscar Lindberg, Kevin Hayes and Mats Zuccarello to spoil Columbus’ home opener.

“When something like that happens at the end, I think we’re gonna be a better team because of it,” defenseman Ryan Murray told reporters after the game. “It’s a harsh lesson, but it’s a good one.

Luckily for Columbus, they won’t have to wait very long to try and get their revenge.

The Blue Jackets and Rangers will finish off their home-and-home series at Madison Square Garden on Saturday night, which might not be such a bad thing for Columbus.

“It’s good that we get another chance tomorrow,” Saad said after Friday’s game. “We were high on emotions (after the go-ahead goal) and they scored and it took the wind out of our sails, but we have to keep playing. We have to learn to keep doing our thing, regardless of the score.”



Kings GM says Mike Richards went into ‘a destructive spiral’

Mike Richards

The Los Angeles Kings may owe Mike Richards money until 2031 (seriously), but in settling his grievance, the team and player more or less get to turn the page.

Not before Kings GM Dean Lombardi shares his sometimes startling perspective, though.

Lombardi has a tendency to be candid, especially in the press release-heavy world of sports management. Even by his standards, his account of Richards’ “destructive sprial” is a staggering read from the Los Angeles Times’ Lisa Dillman.

“Without a doubt, the realization of what happened to Mike Richards is the most traumatic episode of my career,” Lombardi said in a written summation he provided to the Los Angeles Times. “At times, I think that I will never recover from it. It is difficult to trust anyone right now – and you begin to question whether you can trust your own judgment. The only thing I can think of that would be worse would be suspecting your wife of cheating on you for five years and then finding out in fact it was true.”

Lombardi provides plenty of eyebrow-raising statements to Dillman, including:

  • He believed he “found his own Derek Jeter” in Richards, a player who “at one time symbolized everything that was special about the sport.”
  • Lombardi remarked that “his production dropped 50 percent and the certain ‘it’ factor he had was vaporizing in front of me daily.”
  • The Kings GM believes that he was “played” by Richards.

… Yeah.

Again, it’s a powerful read that you should soak in yourself, even if you’re unhappy with the way the Kings handled the situation.

Maybe the most pressing of many lingering questions is: will we get to hear Richards’ side of the story?