Ilya Kovalchuk

Best and worst sweaters of all-time: New Jersey Devils

The Devils haven’t always been the entertaining team on the ice, but they’ve been winners. That sort of attitude applies to their sweaters over the years, as they haven’t always been entertaining or controversial but they’ve always been great. From guys like Pat Verbeek and Chris Terreri to Scott Stevens, Scott Niedermayer, Martin Brodeur, and Ilya Kovalchuk they’ve had the names but the same look on the ice. But what about those sweaters?

Best: Well, there’s not a lot of room for error here when examining the Devils’ sweaters of the past. They’ve had two different types of sweaters and, depending on your preference in colors that determines which way things fall here. Given that I’m just north of 30 years-old and spent my formative years watching hockey in the 80s and early 90s… I’m a big fan of the “Christmas” color jerseys the team adopted from the moment they arrived in New Jersey in 1982 that lasted until black replaced green in 1992.

Worst: The Devils haven’t done anything egregious at all in their history and I’m not about to call anything they’ve done to be the “worst” of anything. Some of you might take issue with the old days wearing green and red, but those sweaters still looked nice. Switching to black, while predictable in the early 90’s, made a ton of sense considering they’re named the Devils. After all, what colors do you see devils wearing in artistic representations most often? Yup.

Old-timey favorite: The Devils weren’t always in New Jersey. They were born originally in Kansas City as the Scouts and moved to Denver to become the Rockies. Of those previous iterations, the Kansas City Scouts sweater from 1974 is iconic for its wild striping, funky colors, and logo that paid homage to a Kansas City landmark and history as a western outpost.

Assessment: The Devils are about as boring with their sweaters as they were back in the mid-90s under Jacques Lemaire and the neutral zone trap.  The difference here is that people reflect upon the Devils sweaters and its interlocking “NJ” with love and admiration. After all, it was featured prominently in the film “Clerks” and if you don’t love “Clerks” you’re either not a child of the 90s or Kevin Smith himself. The Devils have avoided the third jersey plague and they’ve even brought back the green and red jerseys once a year for St. Patrick’s Day. What’s not to appreciate about that?

Lucic: If I wanted to hurt Couture, ‘I would have hurt him’


Last night in Los Angeles, Kings forward Milan Lucic received a match penalty after skating the entire width of the ice to give San Jose’s Logan Couture a two-hand shove to the face.

Lucic didn’t hurt Couture, who had caught Lucic with an open-ice hit that Lucic didn’t like. Couture’s smiling, mocking face was good evidence that the Sharks’ forward was going to be OK.

This morning, Lucic was still in disbelief that he was penalized so harshly.

“I didn’t cross any line,” Lucic said, per Rich Hammond of the O.C. Register. “Believe me, if my intentions were to hurt him, I would have hurt him.”

While Lucic knew he deserved a penalty, he said after the game that he didn’t “know why it was called a match penalty.” His coach, Darryl Sutter, agreed, calling it “a borderline even roughing penalty.”

And though former NHL referee Kerry Fraser believes a match penalty was indeed warranted, Lucic said this morning that he hasn’t heard from the NHL about any possible supplemental discipline.

Nor for that matter has Dustin Brown, after his high hit on Couture in the first period.

In conclusion, it’s good to have hockey back.

Related: Sutter says Kings weren’t ‘interested’ in checking the Sharks

Torres apologizes to Silfverberg and Sharks


A statement from Raffi Torres:

“I accept the 41-game suspension handed down to me by the NHL’s Department of Player Safety. I worked extremely hard over the last two years following reconstructive knee surgery to resume my NHL career, and this is the last thing I wanted to happen. I am disappointed I have put myself in a position to be suspended again. I sincerely apologize to Jakob for the hit that led to this suspension, and I’m extremely thankful that he wasn’t seriously injured as a result of the play. I also want to apologize to my Sharks teammates and the organization.”

A statement from San Jose GM Doug Wilson:

“The Sharks organization fully supports the NHL’s supplementary discipline decision regarding Raffi. While we do not believe there was any malicious intent, this type of hit is unacceptable and has no place in our game. There is a difference between playing hard and crossing the line and there is no doubt, in this instance, Raffi crossed that line. We’re very thankful that Jakob was not seriously injured as a result of this play.”

Silfverberg says he expects to play Saturday when the Ducks open their regular season Saturday in San Jose.