Paul Kariya

Best and worst sweaters of all-time: Anaheim Ducks

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Going from the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim made famous by Paul Kariya and Guy Hebert to the Anaheim Ducks who became more professional and won a Stanley Cup with Chris Pronger and Jean-Sebastien Giguere made for a drastic change in looks. As for what looked best and what didn’t pull the trick off so well… That’s a bit easier to figure out.

Best: The Ducks’ sweater history is fascinating. From their opening years as the by-product of a Disney movie to their current days with a logo that doesn’t exactly do a whole lot for everyone, the ones that did it the best were the home whites they had during their 2003 Stanley Cup finals run. The menacing duck goalie mask logo on the front, a more stylized circular logo on the shoulders and all the plum and teal coloring you can handle.

Worst: Yeah, yeah… We know their “Wildwing” third jersey from the 1995-1996 season is the kind of horror inflicted by some ad wizards hoping to capitalize on their cartoony mascot and Disney roots. It was a terrible jersey, but in their Disney era there’s another third of theirs that makes even less sense. Their dual third jerseys from 1997-1999 that saw them have differently styled thirds for both home and away were just deviations from their already perfect uniforms. Their road thirds, however, are hideous. With more color being blasted across them and amplifying the amount of teal and plum your eyes could handle, it was as if someone told the Mighty Ducks that more color was needed to make more money. Brutal.

Old-timey goodness: The Ducks don’t have a long history, but one of their thirds tried to evoke that old time style. The Ducks broke out a very dark sweater from 2003-2006 with “Mighty Ducks of Anaheim” in bold script across the front and an interlocking “MD” on the shoulders. It could’ve been nice if it made any damn sense at all for what the team had going on with their regular jerseys. It was a third jersey for third jersey’s sake and not very memorable or necessary.

Assessment: Their current black, gold, and orange set up that features a word mark logo on their home and away jerseys is plain as plain could be. With new ownership came new colors and no sign of the Disney days… Until their third jersey arrived. I like the newest third. Embracing a crest logo with the webbed-foot “D” and then the oval-shaped shoulder logo with the old duck mask logo involved in it is a great touch. Adding more orange makes it even more bold too. They might not escape the black jerseys ever again, but it gives them a more professional look.

(Photo credit:

Lucic: If I wanted to hurt Couture, ‘I would have hurt him’


Last night in Los Angeles, Kings forward Milan Lucic received a match penalty after skating the entire width of the ice to give San Jose’s Logan Couture a two-hand shove to the face.

Lucic didn’t hurt Couture, who had caught Lucic with an open-ice hit that Lucic didn’t like. Couture’s smiling, mocking face was good evidence that the Sharks’ forward was going to be OK.

This morning, Lucic was still in disbelief that he was penalized so harshly.

“I didn’t cross any line,” Lucic said, per Rich Hammond of the O.C. Register. “Believe me, if my intentions were to hurt him, I would have hurt him.”

While Lucic knew he deserved a penalty, he said after the game that he didn’t “know why it was called a match penalty.” His coach, Darryl Sutter, agreed, calling it “a borderline even roughing penalty.”

And though former NHL referee Kerry Fraser believes a match penalty was indeed warranted, Lucic said this morning that he hasn’t heard from the NHL about any possible supplemental discipline.

Nor for that matter has Dustin Brown, after his high hit on Couture in the first period.

In conclusion, it’s good to have hockey back.

Related: Sutter says Kings weren’t ‘interested’ in checking the Sharks

Torres apologizes to Silfverberg and Sharks


A statement from Raffi Torres:

“I accept the 41-game suspension handed down to me by the NHL’s Department of Player Safety. I worked extremely hard over the last two years following reconstructive knee surgery to resume my NHL career, and this is the last thing I wanted to happen. I am disappointed I have put myself in a position to be suspended again. I sincerely apologize to Jakob for the hit that led to this suspension, and I’m extremely thankful that he wasn’t seriously injured as a result of the play. I also want to apologize to my Sharks teammates and the organization.”

A statement from San Jose GM Doug Wilson:

“The Sharks organization fully supports the NHL’s supplementary discipline decision regarding Raffi. While we do not believe there was any malicious intent, this type of hit is unacceptable and has no place in our game. There is a difference between playing hard and crossing the line and there is no doubt, in this instance, Raffi crossed that line. We’re very thankful that Jakob was not seriously injured as a result of this play.”

Silfverberg says he expects to play Saturday when the Ducks open their regular season Saturday in San Jose.