Gary Roberts discusses his post-NHL career as a strength and conditioning coach

During a trying period between the 1994-95 and 96-97 seasons, Gary Roberts’ career was in serious jeopardy. A bad neck injury forced him to play just eight games in 94-95, 35 in 95-96 and miss the 96-97 season entirely. For many people, that might be enough to call it a career at 30 years old.

Although injuries hounded him for the rest of his playing days, Roberts developed intense training regimens that helped him remain an NHL player until he was 43 years old, spending his final season with the Tampa Bay Lightning in 08-09. (Before that, his intensity and grit made him something of a folk legend with the Pittsburgh Penguins, as the “WWGRD?” movement exploded.)

Roberts’ impressive longevity and training methods have made him a sought-after fitness guru in hockey circles, especially after disciples such as Steven Stamkos and Jeff Skinner raved about his process and went on to have exceptional 2010-11 seasons. The Toronto Sun’s Dave Feschuk spotlights Roberts’ path to become such a well-respected strength and conditioning coach in this story.

Roberts spoke about his own training camp struggle when he was 18 and how he fought back from that neck injury at 30.

“I was a skinny fat guy, that’s who I was. Not only was I skinny and weak, but I had high body fat. So basically I had very little lean muscle mass. I didn’t weight train back then. I certainly didn’t have great nutrition. I was a cardiovascular guy . . . I played hockey. I played lacrosse. I thought I was in great shape at 18 years old. (The Calgary Flames) threw me on a pull-up bar for my first fitness test, and I did 1½ pull-ups. I was pretty embarrassed by that.”


“I realized, after what I went through as a player, making a comeback (from a devastating neck injury at age 30) and playing those extra 13 years, that I was only able to do that through the great advice that I got from friends in the nutrition world, and the strength and fitness world. I wish I had that information when I was 18, 19, 20 years old. To be able to pass that on to these guys, and see the way they’re excelling, it’s gratifying.”

Roberts’ attention to detail – especially when it comes to dietary habits – has become well known. Last summer, Stamkos (jokingly?) said he was worried that he would receive a little heat from Roberts when cameras caught him eating popcorn. There’s a method to that madness, though, as proper training and nutrition can make a significant difference in a punishing league that doesn’t provide much margin for error.

“I’m a little over the top with this stuff, you realize,” he said. “I’ve never done anything half-assed before. And I want these athletes to have the right information. Even if they apply the majority of what I tell them . . . they’re going to be way better off. The only reason I played in the NHL until I was 43 was because of what I did off the ice.”

With all the money teams like the Lightning have invested in players like Stamkos, the hope is that they carry that same level of commitment.

The Dallas Stars probably hope that Roberts has a similar effect on their young players as the team’s player development consultant. (Maybe Jamie Benn will have an easier time retaining his locomotive-like energy over a full season with Roberts whispering in his ear?) From the sounds of things, he might be the fittest man for that job.

Cocaine in the NHL: A concern, but not a crisis?

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Does the NHL have a cocaine problem?

TSN caught up with deputy commissioner Bill Daly, who provided some fascinating insight:

“The number of [cocaine] positives are more than they were in previous years and they’re going up,” Daly said. “I wouldn’t say it’s a crisis in any sense. What I’d say is drugs like cocaine are cyclical and you’ve hit a cycle where it’s an ‘in’ drug again.”


Daly said that he’d be surprised  “if we’re talking more than 20 guys” and then touched on something that may be a problem: they don’t test it in a “comprehensive way.”

As Katie Strang’s essential ESPN article about the Los Angeles Kings’ tough season explored in June, there are some challenges for testing for a drug like cocaine. That said, there are also some limitations that may raise some eyebrows.

For one, it metabolizes quickly. Michael McCabe, a Philadelphia-based toxicology expert who works for Robson Forensic, told ESPN.com that, generally speaking, cocaine filters out of the system in two to four days, making it relatively easy to avoid a flag in standard urine tests.

The NHL-NHLPA’s joint drug-testing program is not specifically designed to target recreational drugs such as cocaine or marijuana. The Performance Enhancing Substances Program is put into place to do exactly that — screen for performance-enhancing drugs.

So, are “party drugs” like cocaine and molly an issue for the NHL?

At the moment, the answer almost seems to be: “the league hopes not.”

Daly goes into plenty of detail on the issue, so read the full TSN article for more.

Jason Demers tweets #FreeTorres, gets mocked

Los Angeles Kings v San Jose Sharks - Game One

Following his stunning 41-game suspension, it looks like Raffi Torres has at least one former teammate in his corner.

We haven’t yet seen how the San Jose Sharks or the NHLPA are reacting to the league’s hammer-dropping decision to punish Torres for his Torres-like hit on Jakob Silfverberg, but Jason Demers decided to put in a good word for Torres tonight.

It was a simple message: “#FreeTorres.”

Demers, now of the Dallas Stars, was once with Torres and the Sharks. (In case this post’s main image didn’t make that clear enough already.)

Perhaps this will become “a thing” at some point.

So far, it seems like it’s instead “a thing (that people are making fun of).”

… You get the idea.

The bottom line is that there are some who either a) blindly support Torres because they’re Sharks fans or b) simply think that the punishment was excessive.

The most important statement came from the Department of Player Safety, though.