Alex Kovalev

KHL calling: Brent Sopel headed to Russia; Alex Kovalev to follow?

With the NHL free agent market all but running out of jobs for those available, some players are taking the initiative and finding work elsewhere.

Former Penguins star and former Rangers and Canadiens forward Alex Kovalev is reportedly heading to the KHL. According to sources, Kovalev will sign a deal with Atlant Mytishchi to play hockey next season in his home country. Kovalev spent last season with the Ottawa Senators and Pittsburgh Penguins and scored 16 goals and 18 assists in 74 games combined with each team. In his time with the Penguins, he scored just two goals and five assists.

Over 18 NHL seasons, Kovalev has scored 428 goals and amassed 1,024 points but at 38 years-old he’s lost a step and isn’t as dynamic of a scorer as he once was. While it’ll be sad to see him leave the NHL, he’s seen the game rocket past his abilities to be a big time offensive producer.

source: Getty Images

Former Montreal defenseman and Stanley Cup winner with the Chicago Blackhawks Brent Sopel announced via Twitter that he’s headed to Russia to play in the KHL. Making his signing all the more official was the posting made by Sopel’s wife on her blog saying as much.

Sometimes, well most of the time, things don’t go as planned.  This is one of them.  We have been back in the Syracuse area visiting family for over a week now, and Sopes and Paul returned to Chicago two days ago.  I received a phone call that he signed with the KHL.  Metallurg Novokuznetsk to be exact.  The hardest part is that he’s got to leave by August 9th – not much time.

While Kovalev’s departure would be sad, Sopel’s is a bit surprising given that he’s got some defensive abilities on the blue line and is a capable shot blocker. Last season with Atlanta and Montreal, Sopel had two goals and five assists all with the Thrashers. With the Canadiens, Sopel registered no points and was a -1 in plus/minus in 12 games. Being a defensive defenseman means not scoring points and not getting noticed in your own end.

There’s certainly a place for Sopel in the NHL, but waiting it out and potentially ending up with a two-way deal and winding up in the AHL at some point isn’t too appealing. You can’t fault Sopel for going for the sure thing and the sure money, even if it is so far from home.

Kings grab goalie insurance by signing Budaj

LOS ANGELES, CA - SEPTEMBER 22: Jhonas Enroth #1 and Peter Budaj #31 of the Los Angeles Kings stretch before a game against the Arizona Coyotes at STAPLES Center on September 22, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Andrew D. Bernstein/NHLI via Getty Images)
via Los Angeles Kings
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In slightly less interesting Los Angeles Kings news than the latest in the Mike Richards fiasco, the team handed Peter Budaj a one-year, two-way deal on Friday.

The veteran goalie’s contract pays $575K on the NHL level and $100K in the AHL (though it’s $150K guaranteed), according to Hockey’s Cap.

At the moment, it sounds like Budaj will be third on the Kings’ goalie depth chart. That says as much about how things have been going lately for Los Angeles than Budaj’s work on a PTO.

As noted above, one of the more significant moves in Budaj’s favor came when the New York Islanders claimed Jean-Francois Berube off of waivers this week.

The Kings actually waived Budaj before signing him, so this has to be a relief to a goalie with a fairly robust resume as a backup.

All apologies to Budaj, but it’s probably true that the Kings would prefer not to see him at the NHL level very often in 2015-16.

Kings, NHLPA announce settlement in Richards grievance

Los Angeles Kings v New York Rangers

The Los Angeles Kings announced today that they have “reached an agreement with Mike Richards to resolve the grievance filed in relation to the termination of his NHL Standard Players Contract. The terms are agreeable to all parties.”

The club said that it will not be commenting further “on the terms” of the settlement.

The NHLPA released a similar statement.

It was reported earlier in the week that a settlement was close to being reached; however, it wasn’t clear what salary-cap penalties the Kings would incur.

We’re starting to find out some details now:

How the final numbers differ from what the Kings would have incurred if they’d bought Richards out will be interesting to see. And if there are differences, how will they be justified?

Stay tuned.