Mike Richards responds to all the hubbub surrounding ‘Dry Island’


In what might be the least shocking development of the week, current Los Angeles Kings and former Philadelphia Flyers center Mike Richards downplayed the “Dry Island” rumors during a Tuesday appearance on TSN’s That’s Hockey.

Richards didn’t deny the existence of the somewhat comically named idea, he just put it in what is likely the most realistic context: that it wasn’t that big of a deal. Now, it’s quite possible that character issues still were among the top reasons that the Flyers decided to part ways with Richards and Jeff Carter. It’s just tough to fathom that it all fell apart because they opted against enlisting in the equivalent to giving up booze for Lent.

Say what you will about Richards’ prickly relationship with the Philadelphia media – one of the other leading reasons why people think that he was traded – but he’s right that the duo didn’t get traded because of “Dry Island.” Richards even paraphrased the Las Vegas tourism motto when responding to the gossip.

“I believe what happens in the dressing room should stay in the dressing room,” Richards told TSN’s That’s Hockey on Tuesday. “It was just something that happened for a handful of guys, just more of a playful thing that half the team took part in and the other half didn’t.

“It wasn’t a big deal…It was just a joke around the locker room and obviously leaked out and someone’s trying to make a mountain out of it.”


“It couldn’t be further from the truth,” Richards told TSN. “Unfortunately, things get blown out of proportion and things get said and taken out of context too. I’m not sure if people are trying to get a sense of it or trying to convince other people that it was the reason, but at the same time, it’s not true at all.”

It’s easy to scoff a bit at “what happens in the locker room, stays in the locker room” line but it cuts to the core of this story’s biggest issue. If it’s true that Flyers GM Paul Holmgren gave his team a facelift for reasons that go beyond the franchise’s desperate urge for a reliable goalie, then he still has some surgery to do. Having two “unnamed sources” spill the beans about the inner workings of their locker room cannot be a great sign for the team’s sense of order.

Philadelphia Sports Daily transcribed some comments from Laviolette, who echoed the sentiment about locker room details surfacing but didn’t seem to think that “Dry Island” was such a “playful thing.”

“I just don’t think a lot of that should come out,” Laviolette said on 97.5 FM Monday, “for the simple reason of what you guys are talking about. Maybe some guys do some things, maybe some guys don’t do some things. And then there’s a reflection of what does happen or doesn’t happen from inside the locker room and it paints a poor picture.”

However, Laviolette didn’t see “Dry Island” as a “joke” or “playful thing,” as Richards suggested.

“My point was whether you were having three glasses of wine, or one beer, or one vodka — my point was that any alcohol that got taken out of play in that stretch run, while we were trying to push to get back to the playoffs, could have helped our team in any way,” he said. “We did the best we could to get back into position of the playoffs.”

Ultimately, this is a story because of the team and players involved – not to mention how funny the phrase “Dry Island” looks in print. Blaming partying as the driving force behind the departure of the Flyers’ still-young center duo is even sillier than calling anything “Dry Island.”

Hitchcock going to more aggressive attack for Blues

Ken Hitchcock
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ST. LOUIS (AP) After three straight first-round playoff exits, the St. Louis Blues have learned to temper expectations.

They have been consistently among the NHL’s best in the regular season and realize it is past time to build something for the long haul. The sting still lingers from the latest failure, against the Minnesota Wild last spring.

“We’re all disappointed, everybody can agree on that,” defenseman Alex Pietrangelo said. “It’s never easy to kind of think about your failures, but we grow every time it happens.”

Management isn’t ready to tear it all down yet.

“We play, in my opinion, one of the toughest if not the toughest division in the NHL, and we’ve finished first or second in the last four years,” forward Alexander Steen said. “So we have an extremely powerful team.”

Maybe a change in strategy will be enough: Coach Ken Hitchcock is back with a mandate for a more aggressive, even reckless, style of play from a roster that hasn’t changed appreciably.

“We’re coming hard from the back and we’re coming hard to see how close we can get to the attack,” Hitchcock said. “I think it’s where the game’s at; I think it’s where the game’s going to go.”

The 63-year-old Hitchcock is pushing forward, too, unwilling to dwell on the flameouts. Coach and players agree that would be “wasted energy.”

“My opinion is when you sit and think about the past, you do yourself no good,” Hitchcock said. “If you learn from the past, that’s when you do yourself a whole bunch of good.”

There were only two major roster casualties. Forward Troy Brouwer came from Washington in a trade for fan favorite T.J. Oshie. Defenseman Barret Jackman, the franchise career leader in games, wasn’t re-signed.

“If you were expecting 23 new faces to be on the roster this year, I don’t think that was realistic,” captain David Backes said. “We’re going to miss those guys in the room and on the ice, but there has been some changeover and I think it’s pretty significant.”

Things to watch for with the Blues:

GOALIE SHUFFLE: Just like last year, there’s no true No. 1 with Brian Elliott and Jake Allen sharing duties. The 25-year-old Allen missed a chance to seize the job last spring when he failed to raise his level in the playoffs.

TOP THREAT: Vladimir Tarasenko had a breakout season with 37 goals and was rewarded with an eight-year, $60 million contract. The 23-year-old winger is by far the Blues’ most dangerous scoring option and said he won’t let the money affect his play. “I never worry about it,” Tarasenko said. “If you play good, you play good.”

NEW FACES: Brouwer and center Kyle Brodziak add a physical element that was perhaps lacking a bit last season. Brouwer has three 20-plus goal seasons and Brodziak, acquired from Minnesota, fills a checking role. Veteran forward Scottie Upshall got a one-year, two-way deal after being coming to camp as a tryout. Rookie forward Robby Fabbri, a first-round pick last year, will get an early look. Another promising youngster, forward Ty Rattie, begins the year at Chicago of the AHL.

RECOVERY WARD: Forward Jori Lehteri bounced back quickly from ankle surgery and opens the season without restrictions. Another forward, Patrik Berglund, could miss half of the season following shoulder surgery.

TRACK RECORD: The Blues won the Central Division last season and Hitchcock, fourth on the career list with 708 regular-season wins, has consistently had the team near the top of the standings. “He is our coach, tough cookies if you don’t like it,” Backes said. “From my experience, he puts together one heck of a game plan.”

It looks like Havlat won’t make Panthers

Martin Havlat

As PHT’s mentioned before, the Florida Panthers stand as a fascinating contrast between youth and experience.

Let’s not kid ourselves, though; fresh faces usually beat out gray beards, at least when it comes to teams that are still trying to build toward contender status.

While it’s by no means official, two Panthers beat writers – the Miami Herald’s George Richards and the Florida Sun-Sentinel’s Harvey Fialkov – report that the Panthers are likely to pass on Martin Havlat.

It wasn’t just about the likes of Jonathan Huberdeau and Nick Bjugstad leading the charge. Other young Panthers (maybe most notably Quinton Howden and Connor Brickley) made the team, thus making Havlat less necessary.

One would assume that it might be tough for the 34-year-old to find work, at least if he insists upon only an NHL deal.

Health issues continue to dog him, but he’s no longer one of those guys who tantalizes with talent when he is healthy enough to play.

Havlat also doesn’t really bring much to the table defensively. While other veterans can kill penalties and show a little more verstaility, Havlat’s greatest selling point is scoring.

Could this be it for a solid career that may nonetheless end with a “What if?” or two?