Can Nikolai Khabibulin get his career back together?

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If you’re not the patient type, you might think that the Edmonton Oilers are at a crossroads. At some point, Oilers fans will likely grow tired of the word “potential.” Sure, they might be delighted by the bevy of high draft picks still in their teens or early 20’s right now, but at some point earning the top pick of the draft will be more shameful than hopeful. Sooner or later, this team needs to start winning games.

If you’re a realist, it’s pretty tough to envision that time being the 2011-12 season. That being said, a Hollywood scriptwriter might see an obvious redemption story revolving around the Oilers and their wayward goalie Nikolai Khabibulin.

“The Bulin Wall” falls apart

The 38-year-old goalie has seen plenty of ups and downs in his career – from contract squabbles in Phoenix to a Stanley Cup in Tampa Bay to a mixed bag in Chicago and finally that ludicrous four-year, $15 million deal with Edmonton – but things have been decidedly “down” since he became an Oiler. His worst moment came last summer, when he received an extreme DUI and reckless driving charge. Khabibulin was able to appeal and postpone jail time in order to play hockey last season, but will face the music for 30 days (half in prison, half with an “electric monitoring device”) this summer after dropping his appeal.

Things haven’t been much better on the ice, either

This story would probably gain more attention if Khabibulin found the hockey rink as a sanctuary, but if his on-ice results are any indication, it hasn’t provided him much comfort. During two seasons with the Oilers, Khabibulin went 17-41-6 in 63 games played with mediocre (.909 save percentage and 3.03 GAA in 09-10) to awful (.890 save percentage and 3.40 GAA in 10-11) individual numbers.

The Edmonton Journal is polling its audience to see if the goalie deserves a second chance, but since Khabibulin’s contract is a 35+ deal, the Oilers are forced to keep him around unless some foolish team decides to trade for him. Head coach Tom Renney indicated that the starting job is Khabibulin’s to lose, but it wouldn’t be shocking if he had a short leash this season.

Edmonton’s troubling options in net

The team will probably lean on over-sized prospect goalie Devan Dubnyk more either way, especially since he nearly went .500 (12-13-8) and put up an above average .916 save percentage and 2.71 GAA. If their 2011-12 seasons resemble 10-11, it won’t be long before Khabibulin ends up parked on the bench.

It’s a grim situation though, with one goalie who seems done (Khabibulin) and one goalie who might not be ready yet (Dubnyk). Yann Danis ranks as the “break glass in case of an emergency” goalie, but if it comes to that, the Oilers very well might be in draft lottery talk land again.

Really, the only bummer is that Khabibulin isn’t in a contract year. He won a Cup right before his contract expired in Tampa Bay and mysteriously played his best year of hockey with the Blackhawks in a similar situation.

Perhaps the possibility of a 2012-13 turnaround is something Oilers fans can look forward to, because the next season could be another bleak one.

Photo: Fan goes extra mile with Connor McDavid tattoo

via Connor McDavid's Instagram
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Fan comes from the word “fanatic.” Sometimes it’s easy to forget that amid milder displays of sports interest … and then there are those times when that term almost seems insufficient.

Edmonton Oilers superstar Connor McDavid has already encountered awkward fan love in the form of that wonderful photo that went viral. That hasn’t scared him off, yet, as he praised a fan’s very detailed tattoo of McDavid via his Instagram account.

Again, the level of detail is really … something:

How about those Oiler fans… Shoutout to @kyleghostkeeper and the great work by @q_tattoos #crazy

A post shared by Connor Mcdavid (@mcdavid97) on

It’s been a busy time for McDavid, who recently posed for a photo with star Canadian athletes Eugenie Bouchard and Aaron Sanchez:

Good time yesterday with the @rogers crew! ⚾️🎾🏒 #RogersCup

A post shared by Connor Mcdavid (@mcdavid97) on

TSN has a fun cross-sports video of McDavid teaching them to shoot pucks, if you’re interested.

Predators spend big on Ryan Johansen: eight years, $64M

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Much was made about Ryan Johansen really establishing himself as a No. 1 center who could compete with the likes of Ryan Getzlaf and Jonathan Toews during the Nashville Predators’ 2017 Stanley Cup Final run.

The Predators will pay him as such, as they announced a whopping eight-year, $64 million contract on Friday. That’s $8M per season for Johansen, who turns 25 on July 31.

It’s the largest deal signed in franchise history, although that can feel a touch misleading in how it really functions. After all, P.K. Subban‘s cap hit is higher at $9M and they once matched that massive Shea Weber offer sheet. The bottom line is that Johansen joins Subban and Pekka Rinne ($7M) as Nashville’s most expensive players.

The trio of Johansen, Filip Forsberg ($6M), and Viktor Arvidsson ($4.25M) carries a combined cap hit of $18.25 million.

News of Johansen signing a new deal first came from The Tennessean’s Adam Vignan.

Check out this post about how impressive the Predators’ salary structure looked before Johansen’s deal came down. Cap Friendly estimates that Nashville’s cap space goes down to $5.44 million after the signing, which adds some risk to this group but still looks wisely constructed overall.

The good and bad of Canadiens’ cap situation

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Whether you view Mark Streit as Andrei Markov’s replacement or not, the bottom line is that the Montreal Canadiens didn’t bring Markov back.

That decision closes the book on one of the Habs’ biggest mandatory decisions, though with a Cap Friendly estimate of almost $8.5 million in cap space, GM Marc Bergevin’s work may continue.

Even so, saving money on Markov seems like a decent excuse to examine the team’s salary cap situation as a whole, so let’s do just that.

A cheap, impressive group of forwards

Alex Radulov will be missed; there’s little doubting that.

Even so, handing that much term to an aging forward doesn’t seem to be Bergevin’s M.O. If nothing else, the best thing about his work is how affordable Montreal’s high-quality forwards are.

That’s especially true if Bergevin resists the urge to trade Alex Galchenyuk, who still has room to grow at 23, and who’s likely to be a bargain at $4.9 million for three seasons. Along with providing serious talent, Galchenyuk could take some of the heat off of Jonathan Drouin, who carries a lot of pressure for a 22-year-old making $5.5M through 2022-23.

Personally, those two seem like prime candidates to parallel Max Pacioretty‘s sublime steal of $4.5M, though maybe not to the same splendid degree.

Pacioretty’s contract began in 2013-14, and the fun continues until it expires after 2018-19. He’ll be 30 and a UFA by then, so that could be quite the headache for Montreal … but at least they’re enjoying huge savings before that problem comes.

And, hey, maybe it will be time for “Patches” to step into a calmer atmosphere by then, anyway …

The Habs feature two other significant forward contracts: Andrew Shaw (26 years old, $3.9M through 2021-22) and Brendan Gallagher (25, $3.75M through 2020-21). While Shaw has the rings, Gallagher is the most enticing of the two, at least as far as how high one’s ceiling can go.

A void down the middle?

Looking at shorter-term deals, Tomas Plekanec‘s $6M expiring after 2017-18 is especially fascinating.

Center is a weak spot for the Canadiens, and that could linger if Claude Julien can’t make things work with Galchenyuk and/or Drouin. Plekanec is already 34, so what would the future hold, especially if he wants something close to his current salary again?

Again, while there are certainly questions to answer, the Habs have done a commendable job putting together an affordable fleet of quality forwards.

Now to the scarier stuff.

On Aug. 16, Carey Price turns 30. The 2017-18 season represents his last at a relative bargain clip of $6.5M. After that, the Canadiens are betting big that he can remain an all-world goalie; he carries a $10.5M cap hit from 2018-19 to 2025-26. Yikes.

Oddly enough, Shea Weber‘s birthday is Aug. 14, when he’ll turn 32. Weber’s 14-year pact still has long legs, as he’ll carry a $7.857 million cap hit through 2025-26. Yikes again.

Slow burn

When it comes to the defensive side, the Canadiens might not be the most … mobile bunch, especially after parting ways with solid depth guy Nathan Beaulieu and prospect Mikhail Sergachev.

At 39, Mark Streit doesn’t exactly add fresh legs to a group that could get old in a few years. Your mileage will vary regarding how positive an impact you expect from Weber and new signing Karl Alzner. If things go awry, one would expect some serious griping about the exits of Markov, Alexei Emelin, Beaulieu, and even Sergachev.

(At least there’s Jeff Petry, who seems to gain approval from just about everyone. Just about.)

For the next three seasons, the Canadiens are on the hook for Weber, Petry, Alzner, and David Schlemko for about $20 million combined. Beginning in 2018-19, that defense and Price would cost about $30.5 million.

That combination could turn into a real problem, really fast.

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Then again, it’s not as bad if you look at the situation in a more “instant gratification” way.

Weber still has value now, and Alzner adds experience at a reasonable age. Few coaches can optimize such a defense like Julien can, and things could really cook if Price is Price and those forwards get at least some room to breathe.

And, hey, that $8M and change could be put to interesting use. Did you hear that Jaromir Jagr wanted to be a member of the Habs not so long ago?

It’s easy to see gloom and doom in the forecast, yet for next season, the outlook is fairly sunny. Bergevin’s made his mistakes, but this should be a fascinating team to watch in 2017-18.

Hobey Baker winner Will Butcher would consider offer from Penguins

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Instead of signing with the Colorado Avalanche – the team that drafted him – Will Butcher will reportedly test free agency starting on Aug. 15.

The Hobey Baker Award-winning defenseman would make sense for an array of NHL teams, really, with the Chicago Blackhawks and Toronto Maple Leafs mentioned among early considerations.

So, what about the Pittsburgh Penguins, a team that’s lost some talent on the blueline and has enjoyed some success with NCAA products? Well, it remains to be seen if the defending repeat champions would be interested in Butcher’s services, but the defenseman’s agent told Josh Mackey of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette that they would certainly listen.

“If they happen to call,” Brian Bartlett said. “I’m sure we’d answer the phone.”

Mackey notes some of the successful college players the Penguins have deployed.

There’s familiarity here, too: Bartlett also represents former college players and current Penguins Bryan Rust (Notre Dame), Scott Wilson (UMass-Lowell) and Josh Archibald (Nebraska-Omaha).

Bartlett also claims that Butcher, 22, wouldn’t demand an immediate spot on an NHL roster. That’s nice to hear … although you wonder if a team offering as much would get a better chance to land him, especially since entry-level contract limits mean that a “bidding war” would come down to what team, situation, and location he’d prefer.

Considering the possibility for a nice reward and the fairly limited risk involved, plenty of teams should be interested in Butcher. It sounds like the interest would be mutual if the Penguins were one of those suitors.

One way or another, we’ll likely learn more in a bit more than two weeks.

Update: The Athletic’s Craig Custance reports that the Detroit Red Wings are interested in Butcher, too.