Cam Janssen

Cam Janssen’s move back to New Jersey one he says is to make him less comfortable

When enforcer Cam Janssen signed on as a free agent this summer with the New Jersey Devils, it was a homecoming of sorts for him. After all, Janssen came up through the Devils system going back to his days with the Albany River Rats and on to his NHL career with the Devils. Going back to where you started is sometimes a great thing and provides a comfort zone.

That comfort zone aspect, however, is something Janssen was looking to shake up after deciding to leave St. Louis through free agency. Janssen being a St. Louis native and playing for the hometown Blues proved to be a good thing for a while for the six year NHL veteran, but as he tells Jeremy Rutherford of St. Louis Post-Dispatch, it proved to make things a bit too comfortable for him in the end.

Saying this week that he’s both ecstatic to become a Devil again and sad to see his days with the Blues end, Janssen admitted that it was time to move on.

“I felt like I was spoiled here,” Janssen said. “I’m living next to my parents. I have my friends here. It’s hard to explain. It was reality, but it was not reality, too. To play in your hometown, you have distractions. It takes a toll on you, it really does. That’s the life you live as a professional hockey player, don’t get me wrong, but it’s magnified in your hometown.

“It was the best time of my life, but it was time for a change, it really was. I think everybody saw that.”

Janssen isn’t what you’d call an integral player on an NHL roster. Over his career he’s averaged just 4:49 of ice time per game and when your role on a roster is as an enforcer, ice time these days in the NHL is tougher to come by. While some teams have moved completely away from having tough guys on the roster (Detroit and Tampa Bay) others seem to treat enforcers like a side sow production to put them out there against other brawlers so they can do their business.

For Janssen, even playing that role was made a bit trickier in front of the hometown fans as well as for his parents, Denny and Amy Janssen, watching him as well.

Janssen was familiar with the faction of fans who felt he shouldn’t be in the lineup. They cited his lack of production — seven points in 165 games.

“I take everything to heart, I really do, and sometimes that hurt me,” Janssen said.

Denny and Amy heard the criticism in the stands at Scottrade Center.

“It was a little hard because not everybody is a Cam fan,” Denny said. “Sometimes you hear things like ‘Hey Cam, just cause you’re from Eureka’ … that kind of stuff,” Denny said. “That kind of hurt. My wife was always like, ‘Let it go, let it go.’

For Janssen now, he heads back to New Jersey where he cut his teeth in the NHL and while you can’t fully expect to see his ice time grow exponentially, the Devils made themselves a bit meaner by adding Janssen and former Thrashers tough guy Eric Boulton.

Whether that helps make the Devils more of a pain to deal with in the rough going Atlantic Division and back into the playoffs is debatable, but with that brand of hockey back in Newark, the Devils surely won’t be an easy team to handle in a lot of ways. With Ilya Kovalchuk and Zach Parise scoring goals and Boulton and Janssen punching lights out, the Devils figure to be a major thorn in the side.

NHLPA hire Bruce Meyer brings a ‘wealth of knowledge,’ says Fehr

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Bruce Meyer’s résumé of victories as a lawyer is a long and impressive one, and he has now joined the NHL Players’ Association as a senior director of collective bargaining, policy and legal, the union announced Thursday.

During his tenure of more than 25 years at the law firm Weil, Gotshal and Manges LLP, Meyer represented the NHLPA, NFLPA and NBPA.

The NHLPA said in a statement that in his new position, Meyer “will focus on a wide array of policy and legal issues.”

In working for those unions, he was involved in matters such as collective bargaining and arbitration, as per his online profile.

“Bruce will be a great addition to the NHLPA’s staff. He brings a wealth of knowledge to this new role coming from his law firm where he gained three decades’ worth of valuable experience, including effectively representing the NHLPA and other Players’ Associations as outside counsel,” said NHLPA executive director Don Fehr in a statement.

The NHLPA said Meyer will begin at his new position in mid-August.

The news of this hire comes more than a month after the league sued the NHLPA after Dennis Wideman‘s 20-game suspension for hitting linesman Don Henderson was reduced to 10 games by a neutral arbitrator.

Related: Report: NHL dismisses neutral arbitrator who reduced Wideman’s suspension

Sweet ride: Blackhawks sponsor CJ Wilson Racing’s Porsche Cayman at Road America

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Chicago Blackhawks fans, start your engines!

Yes, according to MotorSportsTalk, the Blackhawks have become the main sponsor of CJ Wilson Racing’s No. 35 car, a Porsche Cayman GT4 Clubsport, for the upcoming IMSA Continental Tire SportsCar Challenge event at Road America next month.

That’s a sweet ride.

From MotorSportsTalk:

The partnership will officially launch at the United Center on Wednesday, August 3, from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m in advance of Saturday’s race. Fans will have the opportunity to get up close to the car, meet the drivers and Blackhawks Ambassador Denis Savard, and have their picture taken.

The race takes place Aug. 6 at Road America in Wisconsin.

Third team’s the charm? Devils ink Gormley to one-year, two-way deal

<>during the first period at TD Garden on November 12, 2015 in Boston, Massachusetts.
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Since being selected by the Coyotes at 13th overall in the 2010 NHL Draft, Brandon Gormley has had a difficult time breaking into the league on a full-time basis.

On Thursday, the 24-year-old Gormley joined his third NHL team, signing with the New Jersey Devils on a one-year, two-way deal worth $650,000 at the NHL level, the club announced.

Despite his draft status, Gormley has yet to play a full season in the big league, although this deal could give him an opportunity to end that. For the Devils, the deal adds more depth to the blue line in the organization and for a friendly price.

Last season, Gormley split time between the Colorado Avalanche and its farm team, the San Antonio Rampage. Despite some high expectations about where he could fit on the Avs’ blue line, he was eventually put on waivers in January.

He ended the season with one assist in 26 games with the Avalanche, and hit the open market after Colorado didn’t give him a qualifying offer.

Wild sign Dumba to two-year, $5.1M deal

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After ongoing contract talks between the Minnesota Wild and restricted free agent defenseman Matt Dumba, the two sides have come to a deal.

The Wild announced Thursday that they had signed Dumba to a two-year deal, worth a total value of $5.1 million.

A breakdown of the new deal:

— In 2016-17: $2.35 million.

— In 2017-18: $2.75 million.

Selected seventh overall by the Wild in 2012, Dumba had his most productive campaign this past season, with 10 goals and 26 points in 81 games.

Known for his offensive skills — he had 20 goals and 57 points with Red Deer in the WHL in his draft year — Dumba also brings a coveted right-shot to the Wild blue line, which features four players with contracts of four or more years of term remaining.

As per General Fanager, the Wild still have $2.168 million in projected cap space, but they have secured all their remaining restricted free agents.