Alexei Yashin on Islanders, other options: ‘There’s not any rush to make a decision’


In the middle of hockey-starved July, the prospect of exiled and polarizing former star Alexei Yashin making his return to the NHL – let alone the New York Islanders, of all teams – becomes a big story. While many scoffed at the notion, both sides have admitted that there’s been some flirtation back and forth, meaning that the Islanders may indeed pay Yashin twice during the 2011-12 season. (The first payments would be for the lingering contract buyout that will reward him $2.2 million per year 2014-15, the second if the two sides agree to a new deal.)

While the situation furrows more than a few brows and produces countless punchlines in hockey circles, we might not get an answer for some time. The Islanders certainly have bigger fish to fry with the August 1 public referendum for an essential new arena hanging over their heads, but Yashin seems like he’s not feeling very hasty either.

Yashin is reportedly working out at the Islanders training facility, but he told Katie Strang of Newsday that he might need some time to mull over his options.

Yashin said he has no timeline on when he plans to make a decision. The KHL season begins in September; the Islanders’ opening night is Oct. 8 against the Florida Panthers .

“I don’t think there’s a particular date. It takes time,” Yashin said. “There’s not any rush to make a decision.”

Can Yashin compete at a high level after four years away from the NHL?

Of course, the natural question is to ask: is Yashin even worth the trouble? The 37-year-old center didn’t have the juice to justify the outrageous 10-year, $87.5 million deal that the franchise handed him in 2001, but he helped the team make the playoffs in four of his five seasons before the buyout. They haven’t made the playoffs since he departed after scoring 50 points in an injury shortened, 58-game 2006-07 season.

That being said, an older player’s game can slip even when he stays in the NHL, so one wonders if Yashin (and fellow controversial returnee Jaromir Jagr) can be effective at an advanced age following a significant hiatus. Yashin seemed confident that he can contribute at the NHL level when discussing the matter with ESPN’s Scott Burnside, noting the veteran successes enjoyed by the likes of Nicklas Lidstrom, Mark Recchi and so on.

“If you’re talking about age, I think it’s more important that it’s the right situation and the right environment so you can perform,” Yashin said.

“I feel confident about myself.”

Of course, none of those players Yashin mentioned carry the same amount of baggage as he will (whether that baggage is totally fair or not).

What role Yashin might fill if he signs with the Islanders

Looking at the Islanders’ 2010-11 time on ice numbers, it might be safe to assume that Yashin would play a Doug Weight-type role on the team, although Weight’s 18 games played provides an admittedly limited road map. Still, the general usage seems like it would be on the nose: solid total time on ice (17:31 minutes per game), tons of power play time (Weight averaged almost five minutes per game) and protected minutes otherwise (less than 30 seconds of penalty kill time per contest).

It’s doubtful that fans will gauge Yashin in the proper context – a limited but potentially skilled forward at this point in his career – even if the Isles sign him to an affordable one-year contract. Most will probably look at Yashin’s cost as “$2.2 million + his new contract amount” and attach bloated expectations to the much-criticized Russian scorer.

For me, the biggest “If” revolves around whether or not the reward is worth the potential chemistry risk. That being said, if any team knows Yashin, it’s the Islanders. In a big picture sense it might not be as bad of a move as some might think, even if the ceiling is pretty low.

PHT Morning Skate: This artist paints a picture while singing the national anthem

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PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

–Artist Joe Everson  paints an amazing picture while singing the national anthem prior to an ECHL game. (Top)

–Is Patrice Bergeron the greatest defensive forward of all-time? (The Hockey News)

–Caps rookie Zach Sanford sang “Sweet Caroline” during the team’s Halloween party. (CSN Mid-Atlantic)

–This goalie makes his AHL debut and he was backed up by…his father! (NHL)

Auston Matthews‘ Halloween costume had a political twist. (The Score)

–10 NHL players that still don’t look right in their new uniforms. (Bardown)

Report: Ducks put Despres on long-term injured reserve

FILE - In this Sept. 22, 2015, file photo, Anaheim Ducks defenseman Simon Despres skates before an NHL preseason hockey game against the Colorado Avalanche in Denver. Despres has agreed to a five-year contract extension with the Ducks on Friday, Oct. 9, 2015, solidifying his role in Anaheim after joining the club in a trade last season. (AP Photo/Jack Dempsey, File)
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Simon Despres has played only once this season, back on Oct. 13, due to injury.

It now appears the Anaheim Ducks don’t see the 25-year-old defenseman returning to their lineup any time soon.

On Sunday, TSN’s Bob McKenzie reported on Twitter that the Ducks placed Despres, who carries an average annual value of $3.7 million, on long-term injured reserve, providing Anaheim with some flexibility in the salary cap situation.

By placing Despres on LTIR, it’s been suggested this could possibly allow the Ducks to sign restricted free agent defenseman Hampus Lindholm.

Lindholm, 22, missed training camp, instead deciding to stay in Sweden while he awaits a deal with the Ducks. Six games into Anaheim’s season, and still no deal.

It was reported last month that Lindholm was seeking a deal of eight years, and at least $6 million per season.

Last week, on TSN’s Insider Trading, McKenzie suggested the two sides could be about $250,000, annually, apart. He also added that there is a “cap hit penalty” when restricted free agents don’t get signed before the season begins.

“For every day that (Lindholm) is not signed in this season, the cap hit for the team will increase by about $30,000 if he were to agree to a $5.5 million deal,” McKenzie reported.

“Let’s say he agrees to a deal that’s $5.5 million AAV, well the cap hit’s going to be up around $5.8 (million) as of now, for each day that goes on.”

Comeback Canucks? Not against the Ducks

ANAHEIM, CA - OCTOBER 23:  Alexander Edler #23 and Philip Larsen #63 of the Vancouver Canucks look on after Corey Perry #10 of the Anaheim Ducks reacts to scoring a goal during the third  period of a game at Honda Center on October 23, 2016 in Anaheim, California.  (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)
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The Vancouver Canucks have made a habit of third-period comebacks early this season. Playing with the lead, though? Not so much.

Despite their early penchant for late-game magic — certainly not a sustainable method of winning in the long-term — the Canucks were unable to score a come-from-behind win against the Anaheim Ducks on Sunday.

Instead, they lost 4-2, as Nick Ritchie and Corey Perry scored late in the third period to nullify any chance of a Vancouver comeback.

Henrik Sedin had gotten the Canucks back into a tied game early in the final period, before the Ducks killed off a Vancouver power play and then surged ahead for good.

It’s Vancouver’s first regulation loss of the season. In six games, the Canucks have played with the lead only once.

Really, the score flattered the Canucks, playing the second half of a back-to-back set in California. The Ducks dominated possession, but goalie Ryan Miller kept the Canucks in it until late in regulation.

The Canucks are now 4-1-1. That’s still a good start, but there have been signs lately that they could soon be served a reality check.


Meanwhile, the Ducks have won two in a row after losing their first four games to start the season.

It was promising that their best players were their best players in Anaheim’s home opener.

Ryan Getzlaf had three assists. Corey Perry had an assist on the winner and scored to put this one away. Defenseman Cam Fowler, who has been at the center of trade speculation in the past few months, scored Sunday and is now up to three goals, with points in four of six games.

“He’s played great,” Getzlaf recently told the Orange County Register. “Cam put a lot on his shoulders last year. He had a great year for us last year and it gets overlooked a little bit because he does it in a little bit quieter way. He’s not flashy.

“I thought his play has carried over from last year. He’s continued to play the same way and at a high level.”

This win puts the Ducks within a point of the San Jose Sharks. The two California rivals face each other Tuesday in San Jose.

Video: Dan Girardi’s first goal in nearly a year lifts Rangers to victory

FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2012, file photo, New York Rangers' Dan Girardi looks on during an NHL hockey game against the Philadelphia Flyers in Philadelphia. The Rangers say they have agreed to terms with Girardi on a multiyear contract extension, taking the key defenseman off the trading block and keeping him away from unrestricted free agency. The deal was announced Friday, Feb. 28, 2014. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum, File)
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An offensive defenseman, Dan Girardi is not.

His last goal prior to this weekend? Nov. 12, 2015. It’s been a while. Almost an entire year now. But in his return to the New York Rangers lineup on Sunday, the 32-year-old Girardi was able to bust his scoring slump on a slap shot from the blue line that beat Arizona Coyotes goalie Louis Domingue.

The Rangers eventually won by a final score of 3-2, with Girardi’s goal counting as the winner. He scored only twice last season, and hasn’t scored more than five goals in a single season since 2009-10.