Looking for leadership: Who is the next St Louis Blues Captain?

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Trading a captain away used to be a mortal sin for an organization. If players tended to stay with the same organization for the duration of their careers, the captains would stay part of the organization for the rest of their lives. Can anyone imagine Maurice Richard, Jean Beliveau or Bob Gainey wearing anything other than the bleu blanc et rouge? Would the Red Wings ever trade Alex Delvecchio or even Steve Yzerman? Would the Boston Bruins ever trade Raymond Bou… nevermind.

Like many other things around the NHL, time brings change.

Over the course of the offseason, the New York Rangers have let their captain Chris Drury walk away and the Philadelphia Flyers have traded Mike Richards to the Kings. Adam Foote has retired in Colorado and Doug Weight has done the same in Long Island. But even more surprising, the Sabres, Devils, and Blues all traded their captains in the middle of the season last year. Craig Rivet was sitting in the press box by the time he was traded from the Sabres and Jaime Langenbrunner was fighting with Jacques Lemaire by the time he was sent out of town. But for the Blues, sending Captain Eric Brewer to the Lightning was a move that truly sent their leader to a new team.

As important as offseason acquisitions are for the Blues, perhaps the most important decision in shaping the team this offseason will be selecting the next captain of the proud franchise.

Returning to the team this season are all three alternate captains: Alex Steen, Barret Jackman, and David Backes. Elsewhere on the roster, Andy McDonald has provided leadership over the last four seasons and star-in-the-making Alex Pietrangelo wore the “A” for Team Canada in the 2010 World Junior Championships. The team has also welcomed veteran leaders and former NHL captains Jason Arnott and Jamie Langenbrunner to the team via free agency. For a team that traded away their leader at the deadline last season, the Blues certainly have their share of candidates to replace Brewer as captain for next season.

For our money, it’s hard to imagine a better captain for the Blues than David Backes. He’s the heart and soul of their young core combining skill, grit, and leadership in one powerful package. The 27-year-old is a two-time 30-goal scorer in the NHL and has only missed three games over the last three seasons. He’s represented the United States in the World Championships three times, was a member of Team USA’s silver medal winning team in the 2010 Winter Olympics, and was an all-star for the first time in his career last season. But more important than any stats that show up on his resume, it’s the way Backes plays the game that makes him the ideal leader for the Blues. He’s the type of player that would do anything for his team—whether its spark his teammates with a body check, an important goal, or even a fight. David Rogers from the Blues blog FrozenNotes.com agrees:

“Backes leads by example. He goes to the dirty areas of the ice and has no fear throwing his body around. Quite often, his physical play helps create scoring chances in the first place, by disrupting the other team’s flow of play. If he needs to stand up for his teammates, he will. If he needs to scrap, he will – and boy has he, just ask Team Canada.

Backes leads the Blues in plenty of offensive categories, but it is his overall play through the intangibles that will likely result in him leading the Blues as the team’s captain in the not too distant future.”

Last season, he signed a 5-year contract extension worth $22.5 million meaning he should be in town until at least 2016. Assuming the Blues don’t trade him after signing him to a long-term extension (see: Philadelphia Flyers), Backes would be an ideal candidate to lead the young team for the foreseeable future.

Oilers lament plenty of ‘individual miscues’ in loss to Ducks

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The Anaheim Ducks are apparently heading out of town, reportedly flying a short distance west to Kelowna, B.C., and leaving behind the playoff-crazed city of Edmonton until the series resumes for Game 4.

On the other hand, the Edmonton Oilers are left to contemplate what went wrong in a 6-3 loss to the Ducks on Sunday, as Anaheim got back in the series but still trails 2-1.

From the 25-second mark of the first period, it seemed the Oilers were on a losing path in this one after Rickard Rakell opened the scoring.

Edmonton did come back, but then quickly gave the game right back to the Ducks, who scored three unanswered goals and had completely taken the crowd in Edmonton out of it in the third period. They did a pretty good job of silencing the fans in Edmonton right away, with three goals before the game was 12 minutes old.

“We worked our way back in, but it wasn’t our night,” said Oilers coach Todd McLellan. “We weren’t sharp enough. Individual miscues were plenty. They were all over the board. You couldn’t even shorten the bench to find two or three lines. There were that many who were erring on a consistent basis.”

The Oilers were able to escape Game 2 with a victory — and Anaheim with a 2-0 series lead — thanks largely to the play of goalie Cam Talbot, but the Ducks solved him Sunday, scoring six times on just 28 shots.

The Oilers may have sparked a brief comeback, but there was really no sugar-coating this one, especially after Anaheim regained the lead and then badly outplayed the hosts in the third period — when the Oilers needed to push for the equalizer.

 

Ducks light up Cam Talbot to defeat Oilers

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Chris Wagner‘s first career playoff goal was the turning point in Game 3 for the Anaheim Ducks, as they defeated the Edmonton Oilers 6-3 to get their first win of this series.

Connor McDavid had just scored (another) spectacular goal, this one to get the Oilers back on even terms at three goals apiece after they fell behind 3-0 in the opening period. The orange crush at Rogers Place was, naturally, in a frenzy at the time.

The tide of this game had suddenly turned in favor of the home team, which had a 2-0 series lead.

As suddenly as the Oilers had come back to tie the game, the Ducks regained the lead. Wagner fired the puck from the side boards toward Cam Talbot, who misplayed the puck off his right arm and into the net.

That was only one part of a difficult night for Talbot, who allowed six goals on 28 shots. Anaheim had built up a three-goal lead less than 12 minutes in and needed only six shots to do so.

Talk about a quick turn of events. Talbot was sensational in Game 2, backstopping the Oilers to another road win with a 39-save performance.Edmonton’s troubles started early in Game 3. Rickard Rakell scored just 25 seconds in on a breakaway and the Ducks were rolling from there.

Wagner’s goal came just 48 seconds after McDavid tied the game. Jakob Silfverberg and Ryan Kesler increased the Anaheim lead in the third period.

This time, there was no inspired comeback from the Oilers.

While the Ducks found their scoring touch, they also received a 24-save performance from John Gibson. He was at his best in the second period, making a couple of key saves, including a great shoulder stop off a three-on-one rush.

Game 4 goes Wednesday in Edmonton.

Video: Connor McDavid puts on a show with this spectacular goal

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Connor McDavid has his first goal of this series against the Anaheim Ducks — and it was a beauty.

(Another spectacular McDavid goal? Get out!)

With one assist so far in this series, McDavid brought the crowd in Edmonton to its feet with a quick stop and cut back to his left against Sami Vatanen, followed immediately with a perfect wrist shot top corner on John Gibson.

“McWow!” is right.

The Oilers fell behind 3-0 in the first period, but that goal from McDavid tied the game before the midway point of the second period.

The celebration didn’t last long.

Just 48 seconds later, Chris Wagner‘s shot from the side boards, a rather harmless looking attempt, was misplayed by Cam Talbot to put Anaheim back in front by a score of 4-3. That’s the score heading into the third period.

‘We weren’t even competitive’ — Blues coach hints at lineup changes for Game 4

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Lineup adjustments can be a common occurrence in the playoffs. Based on his comments Sunday, St. Louis Blues coach Mike Yeo is seriously looking to make some changes for Game 4.

The Blues trail the Nashville Predators 2-1 in the series, following a disappointing 3-1 loss on Sunday.

Nashville dominated puck possession for long stretches, putting this one away on a goal from Roman Josi after just such a shift — caused by a Blues turnover in the defensive end — late in the third period.

Yeo praised the Predators for the way they checked the Blues, but was straight to the point with his assessment of his team’s performance.

“I mean, we scored one goal tonight. Fact of the matter is, for a large part of the game, we weren’t even competitive,” he told reporters.

“We obviously have to be way better. We have to make a couple of changes, personnel-wise, for the next game and look at the tape and see what we can do … a little bit better than tonight because it wasn’t good enough.”

Despite getting outplayed, the Blues were, for much of the second half of the game, one shot away from the tying goal. But hopes of a possible comeback were nullified after a shift of about 1:10 of furious Nashville possession in the offensive zone capped off by the Josi blast.

Blues defensemen Joel Edmundson and Colton Parayko — who both had a miserable day in terms of puck possession — had been stuck on the ice for almost two minutes before Josi scored, per NHL.com.

That’s one glaring example.

“The way we played in our [defensive zone] matched the way that we executed, matched the way that we competed all over the ice,” said Yeo.

“We were waiting to see what they were going to do. We were reacting to that. So we’ve got to initiate much better.”