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How useful will Vinny Prospal be in Columbus?

On Saturday, the Columbus Blue Jackets and GM Scott Howson announced that they had signed free agent forward Vinny Prospal to a one-year, $1.75 million contract. The team has already acquired an assortment of offensive firepower; but then again, they were a team that needed a great deal of offensive talent to compete. He’ll most likely slide into a top-line role while injured winger Kristian Huselius recovers from a torn pectoral muscle that is expected to keep him out for four months. His role is clear, yet his ability to fill said role isn’t as easy to figure out. Will he be able to produce at a high level and help Jeff Carter and Rick Nash become one of the most feared duos in the league?

That’s the million dollar question. For what it’s worth, Howson seems to think that he has found the answer for the first half of the season:

“Vinny Prospal is a proven top six forward in the National Hockey League and we look forward to him playing that role for our hockey club. We are very pleased to be able to add a player of his caliber to our team at this late date in the free agency process.”

Translation: When Huselius injured himself this offseason, we needed to find someone as soon as possible and this is what we could find. Howson further explained the move to Tom Reed of The Columbus Dispatch:

“He’s produced almost everywhere he’s gone. As we went through this process of finding somebody who could help us get through the first part of the season without Kristian, we kept coming back to him. He was at the top of our list in terms of players who were available.”

Even though some people in Columbus fear that Prospal’s reputation is a function of playing in New York, Prospal is the right player for the Blue Jackets at the right time. They aren’t depending on Prospal to carry the team on the first line—they’re just asking him to be able to keep up with Rich Nash and Jeff Carter until Kristian Huselius returns to the line-up. In short bursts, Prospal has proven that he can put points on the board. Just look at last season—even though he only played in 29 games last year, he was second on the team with .79 points per game.

Obviously it would be asking a lot for a 36-year-old playing on his seventh team to score 25 goals and 65 points next season. If teams expected that kind of output, it wouldn’t have taken him three weeks to find a job and he would have signed for more than $1.75 million next season. Most likely, he’ll be a little better than he was a season ago defensively and not quite as productive offensively. Columbus signed him for what he is: a potentially very good stop-gap measure. Once Huselius returns to the line-up, Prospal will provide decent scoring depth and help on the power play for a team that desperately needed help scoring goals last year. Andy Newman at Jackets Cannon understands the best case scenario:

“I’m most excited for what the lineup looks like when Huselius returns, even if that happens to be late January. This adds tremendous depth and will fill out the lineup just in time for the playoffs. With Prospal playing left wing, I imagine Nash will get moved back to the right side, where he has spent plenty of time the past two seasons.”

The most important factor to keep in mind with the Prospal acquisition in Columbus is expectations. For fans who expect him to come in and score at a point-per-game average, they will most likely be disappointed by the end of the season. But for those who understand that he is a streaky player who has the talent to play with the two elite offensive players who are responsible for carrying the Blue Jackets this season, they should be happy with the Prospal signing. He’s a temporary solution for a team that desperately needed someone who could fill a huge void for a few months. Anything beyond that should be icing on the cake. Considering he didn’t cost much and looks to be highly motivated, it should be a situation of the perfect player, fitting into the perfect role at the perfect time.

Video: Penguins coach takes issue with late, high Orpik hit on Maatta

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The Pittsburgh Penguins have spoken out against a late, high hit that Washington Capitals defenseman Brooks Orpik threw on Olli Maatta early in the first period of an eventful Game 2 on Saturday.

Maatta left and didn’t return. He played only 31 seconds, and the Penguins were reduced to five defensemen for a large portion of the game. Orpik was given a minor penalty on the play, but the league’s Department of Player Safety may see it differently.

The hit occurred well after Maatta had gotten rid of the puck. He struggled on his way to the dressing room for further evaluation.

Based on multiple reports, Orpik wasn’t made available to the media following the game, which went to the Penguins as they earned the split on the road.

But the Penguins have taken issue with the hit.

“I thought it was a late hit,” said Penguins coach Mike Sullivan, as per CSN Mid-Atlantic. “I thought it was a target to his head. I think it’s the type of hit everyone in hockey is trying to remove from the game.”

Game on: Penguins even series with rival Capitals

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The Pittsburgh Penguins will head back home with a split of their second-round series with the rival Washington Capitals.

Former Capitals forward Eric Fehr came back to burn his hold team, as he scored with under five minutes remaining in regulation to help lift the Penguins over Washington with a 2-1 victory in an eventful Game 2 on Saturday. Evgeni Malkin threw the puck toward the net and Fehr was able to re-direct it by Braden Holtby.

Oh, this was an eventful game, indeed.

It started early in the first period with Capitals defenseman Brooks Orpik catching Penguins blue liner Olli Maatta with a late and high hit that warranted — at least for now — only a minor penalty for interference. Maatta, clearly in distress following the hit, didn’t play another shift and saw only 31 seconds of ice time in total, as Pittsburgh was reduced to five defensemen for the remainder of the game.

It continued in the third period. Kris Letang was furious after getting called for a trip on Justin Williams, and even more ticked off when the Capitals tied the game on the ensuing power play.

For two periods, the Capitals couldn’t get much going. Only four of their players had registered a shot on goal through 40 minutes, while the Penguins held the edge in that department and held the lead.

Washington came out with more jump in the third period, testing rookie netminder Matt Murray with 14 shots in the final 20 minutes. But the Penguins got the late goal to break the deadlock.

Video: Penguins’ Letang was furious after Capitals tie up Game 2 with power play goal

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Kris Letang watched from the penalty box as the Washington Capitals tied up Game 2 with a power play goal in the third period. The Pittsburgh Penguins defenseman was called for tripping after he appeared to muscle Justin Williams off the puck as he entered the zone.

Letang let his disagreement with the call be known at the time, and was furious after the Capitals capitalized on a goal from Marcus Johansson.

The Capitals started the period down a goal and being outshot 28-10 by the Penguins, who need a win to even the series.

Also, it seems this is worth mentioning:

Video: Hagelin goes top shelf to give Penguins the lead in Game 2

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In their quest to even the series, the Pittsburgh Penguins had done a nice job through two periods of suffocating the Washington Capitals, while gaining the lead on a beautiful goal.

Carl Hagelin took advantage of a vast amount of space that opened up in front of the Washington net, finishing off a nice pass from Nick Bonino, burying his shot just under the cross bar on the glove side of Braden Holtby.

Through two periods, the Penguins were outshooting Washington 28-10. Only four Capitals players — Alex Ovechkin, T.J. Oshie, Evgeny Kuznetsov and Matt Niskanen — had registered shots on goal.