Alexander Semin

When the Caps say they aren’t trading Semin, does anyone listen?


Yet again Alexander Semin’s name has popped up in the rumor mill as trade bait for the Washington Capitals. And yet again, Caps GM George McPhee has done his best to shoot down any rumors by reiterating that Semin won’t be moved over the offseason. Hopefully, fans and prognosticators will remember this categorical denial for more than a few weeks.

This time GM George McPhee (GMGM to the cool kids) used a little humor when explaining his rationale for keeping Semin around for another season. Apparently scoring goals is a good thing. From EJ Hradek on

“We like Semin because he can score goals,” McPhee said Monday, squashing the latest round of Semin trade tales. “Those guys aren’t easy to find.”

“We’ve made our moves,” he continued. “I don’t anticipate us making any other changes. If I go into the season with this group, I’m fine with that.”

At least he tried to change up his rebuff this time. But hidden in the humor is a very serious point—goal scorers are hard to find. Just look at Columbus: the Blue Jackets are still basking in the afterglow of landing a 40-goal scorer a month after they acquired Jeff Carter. Semin is the same type of dynamic offensive talent who is capable of dropping 40 goals and a point-per-game scoring average in any given season. At 27-years-old, he should just be entering his prime as a legitimate NHL scorer.

If Washington was to trade Alexander Semin, the ideal trading partner would be a young team that is looking to win right now—but also has an eye towards the future. You know, a team like the Capitals. There’s also the problem of proper compensation for a serious producer like Semin. The Caps would most likely make a trade with a team that’s in the “win now” mode; but no trading partner would be eager to surrender a player who can replace Semin’s productivity in Washington. Are the Caps willing to settle for draft picks and prospects for a guy who’s proven that he can score 80+ points in a season?

This offseason as seen McPhee and the Capitals actively seek two-way forwards who can add a little grit to the team. The team went out and traded their first round pick at the draft for Stanley Cup champion Troy Brouwer. Fan favorite and overall underrated forward Brooks Laich was given a big-time contract to come back next season. To cap things off up front, Washington lured playoff performer Joel Ward from Nashville to add even more size and grit to their group of forwards.

All three players should help the Capitals next season—but none of them are going to yield the same kind of offensive production as Semin. In fact, last season the one of the worst of Semin’s career—yet he still scored more goals than any of the three signings have ever had in a single season. Like GMGM said, guys who can score 176 goals in less than 400 career games aren’t that easy to find.

They all bring other things to the table, but at some point goals are important to win games. McPhee has made the Capitals a much more well-rounded team with the moves he’s made this offseason. Look at the team is built and Semin is as important as he’s ever been.

Video: NHL drops hammer, suspends Torres for 41 games


One of the NHL’s most notorious hitters has been tagged by the league.

On Monday, the Department of Player Safety announced that San Jose forward Raffi Torres has been suspended 41 games — half of the regular season — for an illegal check to the head of Anaheim’s Jakob Silfverberg.

The length of Torres’ suspension is a combination of the Silfverberg hit and Torres’ history of delivering hits to the heads of opposing players, including Jordan Eberle, Jarret Stoll, Nate Prosser and Marian Hossa.

“Torres has repeatedly violated league playing rules,” the Department of Player Safety explained. “And has been sanctioned multiple times for similar infractions.”

The league also noted that Torres has been warned, fined, or suspended on nine occasions over the course of his career, “the majority of which have involved a hit to an opponent’s head.”

“Same player every year,” Ducks forward Ryan Kesler said following the hit on Silfverberg. “I played with the guy [in Vancouver]. He needs to learn how to hit. That has no part in our game anymore.”

As for what lies ahead, things could get interesting upon potential appeal:

Torres successfully appealed a suspension under the previous CBA, getting his punishment for the Hossa hit reduced from 25 to 21 games.

Under terms of the new CBA, Torres isn’t categorized as a repeat offender because his last suspension came in May of 2013 — more than two years ago. Of course, part of the reason Torres hasn’t run afoul of the league in two years is because he’s barely played.

Knee injuries limited Torres to just 12 games in ’13-14, and he sat out last season entirely.

Blues send down four; keep young d-men Edmundson and Parayko

Magnus Paajarvi
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The St. Louis Blues have assigned two forwards, Magnus Paajarvi and Ty Rattie, and two defensemen, Chris Butler and Petteri Lindbohm, to AHL Chicago.

The moves mean that the Blues will have two young d-men, Joel Edmundson and Colton Parayko, on the opening-day roster, after both impressed in camp.

From the Post-Dispatch:

Lindbohm and Butler looked to be the sixth and seventh defensemen, in that order, at the start of camp, but the play of Edmundson and Parayko won them spots. Parayko had six assists in the preseason, putting him among the NHL leaders. 

Forward Robby Fabbri will also be on the opening-day roster. The 19-year-old is not eligible for the AHL; he can only be returned to junior.

Earlier today, the Blues announced the signing of forward Scottie Upshall.