Garth Snow

Five years of Garth Snow as Isles general manager: Are things getting better?


When Garth Snow took over as the Islanders general manager in the summer of 2006, things on Long Island were as tumultuous and dramatic as ever. As the team looked to move on from former GM Mike Milbury, they’d hired ex-Rangers GM Neil Smith to take the reins. Instead, after just six weeks, Smith was let go and the former goaltender Snow got the call to take over.

Since then, it’s been a wild, up and down ride for Snow filled with its share of controversy in handling former head coaches Ted Nolan and Scott Gordon, having to work around Rick DiPietro’s contract as well as Alexei Yashin’s buyout, and now navigating the free agent waters with a team that’s still below the salary floor Snow’s job is high profile for a lot of the wrong reasons.  While Snow got the Islanders to the playoffs in his first year as GM thanks to acquiring Ryan Smyth, it hasn’t been all rainbows and sunshine as the team has missed the playoffs for four straight seasons.

What Snow can deal with, however, is what he’s trying to put together for the future. With future stars like draftees John Tavares, Kyle Okposo, Calvin de Haan, and 2011 first round pick Ryan Strome on down to acquisitions like Michael Grabner, Matt Moulson, and Mark Streit slowly but surely things are coming together. With how coach Jack Capuano was able to put things together for the Islanders after a horrible start last season under Scott Gordon, things are positive all over Long Island now and Snow told all about why it’s got him excited too. The big reason is John Tavares.

Q: Are you happy with the way he’s developed in his first two years? Is it easy to forget sometimes that he is only 20?

GS: He’s been a high-end player, not only for us but in the League. When you see that he’s only 20 years old, it’s pretty exciting to see what he’s accomplished in his two years in the NHL. I absolutely have to remember sometimes that he’s just 20 — and it’s not just John, but the other young players that we have. They are 20, 21, 22 years old, and that’s young for a hockey player. We obviously are excited about the season coming up, but we’re also excited about what the future brings.

Q: How important is this season? You’ve missed the playoffs four years running, you’ve built up a nice core of talent. How important is it, if not to make the playoffs, to at least to contend for a spot?

GS: Everyone in the locker room is committed to getting this team to the next level. It’s a situation where we wish the season was starting tomorrow.

Getting into the playoffs from the Eastern Conference, fortunately for Snow, is seen as being a bit easier to do. Last season saw the Tampa Bay Lightning go from being nearly a lottery team picking sixth in the 2010 NHL Draft to finishing fifth in the East and make it all the way to the Eastern Conference finals. A lot of that had to do with the work both GM Steve Yzerman and coach Guy Boucher put in, but it also goes to show how quickly things can happen in the East.

Working against Snow’s Islanders is playing in one of the toughest divisions in the NHL. Having to go up against the likes of the Rangers, Devils, Flyers, and Penguins makes life miserable having to play those teams so many times. The NHL’s Pacific Division last year showed that virtually an entire division can make the playoffs (sorry Dallas, you had a fair shot) so anything is possible.

Snow’s Islanders will require better health from all players and better goaltending than they got most of the year. Injuries can’t usually be helped one way or another, but goaltending can be fixed. With DiPietro’s albatross contract they’ll need to find a way to keep him healthy and mix in Al Montoya when necessary.

That’s asking a lot, but with the Islanders missing the playoffs for four straight seasons and an arena issue that will be solved one way or another, the pressure is on for Snow’s rebuilding project to show major strides next season. If they play as hard as they did in the second half of last season, challenging for a playoff spot and even squeaking in as the eighth seed is within reason. The Isles will be good in time, it’s just a matter of when.

Kings GM says Mike Richards went into ‘a destructive spiral’

Mike Richards

The Los Angeles Kings may owe Mike Richards money until 2031 (seriously), but in settling his grievance, the team and player more or less get to turn the page.

Not before Kings GM Dean Lombardi shares his sometimes startling perspective, though.

Lombardi has a tendency to be candid, especially in the press release-heavy world of sports management. Even by his standards, his account of Richards’ “destructive sprial” is a staggering read from the Los Angeles Times’ Lisa Dillman.

“Without a doubt, the realization of what happened to Mike Richards is the most traumatic episode of my career,” Lombardi said in a written summation he provided to the Los Angeles Times. “At times, I think that I will never recover from it. It is difficult to trust anyone right now – and you begin to question whether you can trust your own judgment. The only thing I can think of that would be worse would be suspecting your wife of cheating on you for five years and then finding out in fact it was true.”

Lombardi provides plenty of eyebrow-raising statements to Dillman, including:

  • He believed he “found his own Derek Jeter” in Richards, a player who “at one time symbolized everything that was special about the sport.”
  • Lombardi remarked that “his production dropped 50 percent and the certain ‘it’ factor he had was vaporizing in front of me daily.”
  • The Kings GM believes that he was “played” by Richards.

… Yeah.

Again, it’s a powerful read that you should soak in yourself, even if you’re unhappy with the way the Kings handled the situation.

Maybe the most pressing of many lingering questions is: will we get to hear Richards’ side of the story?

Coyotes exploit another lousy outing from Quick

Jonathan Quick

Despite owning two Stanley Cup rings, there are a healthy number of people who aren’t wild about Jonathan Quick.

Those people might feel validated through the Los Angeles Kings’ first two games, as he followed a rough loss to the San Jose Sharks with a true stinker against the Arizona Coyotes on Friday.

Sometimes a goalie has a bad night stats-wise, yet his team is as much to blame as anything else. You can probably pin this one on Quick, who allowed four goals on just 14 shots through the first two periods.

Things died down in the final frame, but let’s face it; slowing things down is absolutely the Coyotes’ design with a 4-1 lead (which ultimately resulted in a 4-1 win).


A soft 1-0 goal turned out to be a sign of things to come:

Many expected the Kings to roar into this second game after laying an egg in their opener. Instead, the Coyotes exploited Quick’s struggles for a confidence-booster, which included key prospect Max Domi scoring a goal and an assist.

It’s worth mentioning that Mike Smith looked downright fantastic at times, only drawing more attention to Quick’s struggles.


After a troubled summer and a failed 2014-15 season, Los Angeles was likely eager to start things off the right way.

Instead, they instead will likely focus on the fact that they merely dropped two (ugly) games.