Mike Lundin, Scottie Upshall

Wild sign former Lightning defenseman Mike Lundin to one-year, $1M deal

The Tampa Bay Lightning brought back a lot of the pieces from their 2010-11 season, but a few players needed to go. Along with goalie prospect Cedrick Desjardins and playoff anomaly Sean Bergenheim, it appears that puck moving defenseman Mike Lundin couldn’t make the cut. He became an expendable defenseman after the Lightning re-signed Marc-Andre Bergeron and added Bruno Gervais and Matt Gilroy.

Lundin didn’t take very long to find work elsewhere, though, as the rapidly changing Minnesota Wild snatched him up for one-year, $1 million. This could be a nice (if subtle) move for Minnesota. The Wild are attempting to their traditional weakness on offense by acquiring Dany Heatley and Devin Setoguchi, but recent studies of their 2010-11 season numbers actually indicate that Minnesota’s biggest issues could be in their own end.

(The Wild allowed 32 shots per game, tying them with the New York Islanders for sixth worst in the NHL. That’s an especially bad number when you consider the fact that Minnesota only averaged 26.2 shots per game, the worst number in the NHL. Broad brushstrokes or not, those are the kinds of numbers that explain why your team probably won’t make the playoffs in a given season.)

Lundin isn’t the sort of defenseman who will cure all of the Wild’s ills, but he might be the puck-moving type who could help Minnesota spend a bit less time chasing pucks and retrieving rebounds. His greatest asset is in his efficiency; Lundin sports solid mobility and puck-moving ability in his better moments.

He averaged 20+ minutes per game in the last two seasons with Tampa Bay, but it seemed like his role diminished starkly in the playoffs (just 14:41 minutes per game in 18 postseason contests). Lundin will be the seventh defenseman under contract with Minnesota but should get a nice chance to make an impact with Brent Burns out of the picture and a shallow group of blueliners beyond Marek Zidlicky, Greg Zanon and Nick Schultz.

In Jets return, Burmistrov delivers headshot to Bergeron (Updated)

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Didn’t take long for Alex Burmistrov to make his presence felt — though not in a good way.

Burmistrov, playing in his first game for the Jets after a two-year stint in Russia, delivered a questionable elbow to the head of Boston’s Patrice Bergeron late in the first period of Thursday’s season-opener:

Burmistrov received a two-minute minor for an illegal check to the head, while Bergeron received a matching minor for roughing (retaliating for the elbow, specifically).

The Bruins went into the intermission leading 1-0, and have yet to update Bergeron’s status.

Update: Bergeron stayed in the game, but B’s head coach Claude Julien was none too pleased with the hit. Following the game, he called for the NHL’s Department of Player Safety to look at it…

Two-for-two: Another successful coach’s challenge as Sens reverse Kane’s goal

Dave Cameron
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Coaches are quickly getting the hang of this challenge thing.

Following Mike Babcock’s successful challenge in Toronto’s opening-night loss to Montreal on Wednesday, Babcock’s provincial rival — Sens head coach Dave Cameron — got it right as well, successfully reversing Evander Kane‘s would-be equalizer in the third period.

From the league:

At 10:34 of the third period in the Senators/Sabres game, Ottawa requested a Coach’s Challenge to review whether Buffalo was off-side prior to Evander Kane’s goal.

After reviewing all available replays and consulting with NHL Hockey Operations staff, the Linesman determined that Buffalo’s Zemgus Girgensons was off-side prior to the goal. According to Rule 78.7, “The standard for overturning the call in the event of a ‘GOAL’ call on the ice is that the Linesman, after reviewing any and all available replays and consulting with the Toronto Video Room, determines that one or more Players on the attacking team preceded the puck into the attacking zone prior to the goal being scored and that, as a result, the play should have been stopped for an “Off-side” infraction; where this standard is met, the goal will be disallowed.”

Therefore the original call is overturned – no goal Buffalo Sabres.

The clock is re-set to show 9:32 (10:28 elapsed time), when the off-side infraction occurred.

As the league later noted, this was the first coach’s challenge under the offside scenario.