Ryan Callahan, Brandon Dubinsky

Countdown to awkwardness? Dubinsky, Callahan and Purcell among 22 players filing for arbitration

We’ve already seen some big names file for salary arbitration, as New Jersey Devils standout forward Zach Parise and Nashville Predators stud defenseman Shea Weber filed for what could be some lucrative one-year deals (if they get that far). Today’s signings also helped two players avoid that tense process, as the Columbus Blue Jackets forked over a four-year deal to Marc Methot and the Toronto Maple Leafs made a sensible two-year pact with Clarke MacArthur.

There were 22 players who filed for salary arbitration today*, with the New York Rangers topping the list with four potential hearings (with crucial players in play). The deadline for arbitration filing is July 6 at 5:00 p.m. ET, so there might be some more interesting filings tomorrow as well. Keep in mind that the hearings are set anywhere between July 20-August 4, 2011. Those hearings aren’t guaranteed, though; two sides could hash out an agreement right up to the deadline (which has happened plenty of times before, by the way).

* Technically speaking, Methot filed too, but that was obviously just a formality since he signed with the Blue Jackets shortly afterward.

The NHLPA released a list of the 22 players who filed for salary arbitration today. We’ll give you the 4-1-1 on some of the most interesting names for your own nail-biting/entertainment purposes.

Anaheim Ducks

Dan Sexton – the forward christened “Big Sexy” enjoyed a nice run for a while in the 2009-10 season, but shouldn’t be too tough to sign after 19 and 13 point seasons.

source: Getty ImagesBuffalo Sabres

Andrej Sekera – He averaged a bit more than 20 minutes per game in 2010-11 and scored 29 points in 76 games played. Sekera seems like a valuable piece for the Sabres’ defense but it might be tough to squeeze him under the salary cap after Pegulamania ran wild.

Carolina Hurricanes

Derek Joslin

Chicago Blackhawks

Chris Campoli – I’m not Campoli’s biggest fan, but he does have some offensive talent. Unfortunately he’s also a bit dangerous in his own end; many Blackhawks fans will remember him for the turning the puck over to Alex Burrows, who ended Chicago’s season with an overtime Game 7-winning goal. Their solid off-season additions might make Campoli the odd man out if the cost is too high.

Viktor Stalberg – Stalberg came to Chicago in the Kris Versteeg trade and scored a replaceable 24 points during the season. He played in all seven of their playoff games, so maybe he’ll back if the price is right.

Colorado Avalanche

Kevin Porter

Ryan Wilson

Edmonton Oilers

Andrew Cogliano – He can skate like the wind and seems pretty versatile, but one wonders how long people will wait for him to do much more with speed (35 points in 2010-11).

Los Angeles Kings

Alec Martinez

Brad Richardson

source: APMontreal Canadiens

Josh Gorges – Gorges might be the most intriguing test for the arbitration system of this bunch. Injuries ravaged his 2010-11 season and the Habs survived reasonably well, but he played an important shutdown role during their 2010 Cinderella run. Gorges averaged 20 minutes per game for three straight seasons and received noticeable increases when playoff time rolled around.

Nashville Predators

Sergei Kostitsyn – The most mercurial of the two mercurial Kostitsyn brothers, Sergei experienced a career year with Nashville. They received a nice return on a limited investment after he scored 23 goals and 50 points, but will his one-dimensional style make him expendable in their eyes? Maybe it shouldn’t … after all, someone needs to score for that team, right?

New Jersey Devils

Mark Fraser – A lesser man would make a Kelsey Grammer joke here.

New York Islanders

Blake Comeau – The budding power forward had a career year with 24 goals and 21 assists for 45 points while averaging almost 19 minutes per night. He might be able to get a nice little payday.

New York Rangers

Brian Boyle – The hulking forward showed why he was a first round draft pick, unexpectedly scoring 21 goals and 35 points last season. It wouldn’t be shocking if the Rangers walk out on a too-rich ruling for Boyle after he only put together one strong season.

Ryan Callahan and Brandon Dubinsky – I’m putting these two together because they experienced such great chemistry on a line that helped the Rangers make the playoffs. Considering the funny money Glen Sather dishes out to unworthy and/or risky ventures, why not shell out some dough for two heart-and-soul guys who are producing impressive amounts of offense to boot? In a sane world, they won’t make it to arbitration but Sather’s team-building vision isn’t always the clearest.

Michael Sauer – Like Boyle, Sauer boasts a sparse resume but was a genuine contributor last season.

Phoenix Coyotes

Lauri Korpikoski

source: Getty ImagesTampa Bay Lightning

Teddy Purcell – When debating the merits of keeping Purcell vs. Sean Bergenheim, I sided with retaining Purcell. That discussion dissolved once Bergenheim bolted to Dale Tallon’s wacky hockey resort, but it’s worth mentioning that Purcell seemed to have a nice regular season (51 points) before lighting up the playoffs (17 points in 18 postseason games). The Lightning might be wise to avoid arbitration if they want to keep him, because judges might smile upon his impressive contract year.

Vancouver Canucks

Jannik Hansen – He won’t light the world on fire, but Hansen is the type of forward who can absorb spot duty in the top six forwards group, is reasonably proficient in both ends and owns a rare right-handed shot in the Canucks’ winger ranks. Hansen simply might be too expensive, though.

Winnipeg Jets

Blake Wheeler – Wheeler seems like he’s in a perpetual state of negotiations. When he’s not, he’s often getting traded. He’s a decent scorer (44 points in 1o-11) has great size and the pedigree of a first round pick, but teams sour on him at an almost alarming rate. It’ll be interesting to see if the Jets think they have a place for him in their lineup.

Fore! NHL referee makes the cut at PGA Tour’s Canadian Open

OAKVILLE, ON - JULY 22: Garrett Rank hits his second shot on the 16th hole during the second round of the RBC Canadian Open at Glen Abbey Golf Club on July 22, 2016 in Oakville, Canada.  (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)
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There has always seemed to be a connection between hockey players and the game of golf. Some are better than others when it comes to the links.

Take NHL referee Garrett Rank, for example.

Rank, also an amateur golfer, has made the cut at the 2016 Canadian Open at Glen Abbey Golf Club just south of Toronto. He’s currently tied for 36th at even par heading into the weekend. He also sits seven shots behind the leader, Dustin Johnson, the future son-in-law of The Great One, Wayne Gretzky.

Rank, who joined the NHL Officials Association in 2014, has split his time between officiating in the NHL and the American Hockey League. But, according to the PGA Tour website, he was hired as a full-time NHL ref the day before the opening round of this week’s Canadian Open.

“I’d be lying if I told you that I didn’t take my clubs with me when I was on the road,” he told the PGA Tour website. “I think it helps me and makes it a little easier for me because I know that this isn’t the end of the world, whether I shot 65 or 75.”

Rank, 28, is also a cancer survivor. He was diagnosed with testicular cancer in 2011, after initially feeling discomfort while officiating a game.

“When I got the news I tried to maintain a positive attitude,” he told the Toronto Sun. “And you know what, it’s kind of a blessing in disguise. You never want to have cancer wished upon someone but I think it gave me a little better outlook in terms of a bad call on the ice wasn’t as bad. Or hitting a bad shot on the golf course wasn’t the end of the world.

“It has allowed me to stay patient and be grateful for the opportunities and things I have in life.”

Related: PHT Morning Skate: James Wisniewski caddies for PGA Tour golfer Jason Day

Price’s previous injury ‘no longer a concern,’ says Habs goalie coach

Montreal Canadiens goalie Carey Price stops a shot during the second period of an NHL hockey game against the New York Islanders on Friday, Nov. 20, 2015, in New York  (AP Photo/Paul Bereswill)
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More good news when it comes to Carey Price.

After Price had said last month he was 100 per cent healthy following an MCL sprain that ultimately ended his season, Montreal Canadiens goalie coach Stephane Waite reaffirmed that earlier this week in an interview with RDS. That should provide Habs fans with at least a little bit of optimism when it comes to the goalie position after a rather tumultuous summer.

“I’m not a doctor, but all I know is that on the ice it was perfect,” Waite told RDS, as per The Hockey News. “It is 100 percent restored. We are happy and our medical staff did a great job with him to bring him to the top. It is no longer a concern, he is ready to go.”

Habs fans have had a difficult few months. With Price injured, the Canadiens quickly fell out of the playoff race. The off-season has ushered in tremendous change, with the additions of Andrew Shaw and Shea Weber, while the departure of P.K. Subban in that deal with Nashville remains probably the most contentious development in the NHL during the summer.

It is still reality right now that the Habs’ success is still dependent on their goalie Price.

The 28-year-old Price last played a game on Nov. 25, so it’s difficult to imagine there wouldn’t be some initial rust when it comes to getting acclimated once again to game action.

He is also among the three goalies named to Team Canada for the upcoming World Cup of Hockey, which starts Sept. 17. Braden Holtby and Corey Crawford were also named to the squad.

Price started and starred for Canada in its gold-medal win at the 2014 Sochi Olympics, while Holtby and Crawford are established and accomplished NHL goalies.

“It’s a long-ways off,” said Price earlier in the spring, as per NHL.com. “I know I’ll be prepared for that.”

Recently re-signed forward Callahan in tough to make Red Wings

MitchCallahan
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Mitch Callahan signed another one-year deal with the Detroit Red Wings on Thursday, and will look to once again make the jump to the NHL in the fall.

As per General Fanager, the deal pays $600,000 at the NHL level and $175,000 at the AHL.

A sixth-round pick of the Red Wings in 2009, Callahan, who turns 25 years old next month, has only one appearance in the NHL and that was two seasons ago. He’s spent five seasons with the Grand Rapids Griffins in the minors, where he’s posted decent numbers, offensively, with 19 goals and 32 points last season.

But he’s also dealt with injuries, such as a torn ACL in the 2014-15 season. Or a gory injury — 10 teeth plus a broken jaw — after taking a puck to the face in an AHL game in 2014. This past season, he took another puck to the face during practice, losing another tooth.

He’s made it clear in the past that he doesn’t want to be playing in the AHL, although competition for roster spots — Callahan would have to likely work his way into a bottom-six role — in Detroit will be stiff when the Red Wings open up training camp.

From the Detroit Free Press:

He’s almost certain to be exposed on waivers again, as the Wings have 13 active forwards signed to one-way contracts, plus Dylan Larkin and Andreas Athanasiou. And Anthony Mantha is expected to make a push for a spot.

Patrick Eaves bests big hockey names at Smashfest V

eavessmashbeardnhlpa
via NHLPA
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Ping Pong. Beards. Hockey players making funny faces in street clothes. And it’s all to benefit charitable organizations.

Dominic Moore‘s Smashfest V took place on Thursday, with Patrick Eaves and his freakish facial hair taking the top prize for the second year in a row.

Here’s a shot from the happy, bearded winner from the NHLPA:

(His loved ones must be thrilled that this isn’t merely a playoff look for Eaves, by the way.)

This shot of Jeff Skinner and his “most improved” award is just too fitting.

It’s not yet clear exactly how much money was raised for charity, but this is a sign that the event was probably … well, a smash success.

Good stuff. Here’s a random hodgepodge of other photos from the event.

Bonus points to Hall of Famer Eric Lindros for the “beer in other hand” form:

Alex Burrows fell to Eaves in the final round. Seems OK about it:

Antoine Roussel was probably not being a pest on this occasion. We can’t be totally certain, however.

Looks like it was a good time for all.