St. Louis Blues v Columbus Blue Jackets

Blue Jackets keep paying big, avoid arbitration with Marc Methot for 4-years, $12M

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For years, the Columbus Blue Jackets have been wallflowers as the Western Conference playoff dances came into full swing. Even in their one appearance on the dance floor, they didn’t earn a single win and essentially did their Carlton impression during an embarrassing sweep at the hands of the Detroit Red Wings.

The Blue Jackets haven’t been shy during this 2011 off-season, however. To extend the high school dance metaphor, GM Scott Howson spiked the punch (signing James Wisniewski to a risky deal) then forced a dance with a cheerleader (trading for Jeff Carter) much to the chagrin of a potential future sweetheart (Howson traded a first round pick that ended up being Sean Couturier in the Carter deal). Who knows if these gambles will improve Columbus enough for them to become a genuine contender, but their days of being the anonymous dude in the corner are probably over.

Marc Methot isn’t the type of name to move tickets or stop hearts, but he played a big role on the Blue Jackets’ beleaguered blueline the last two seasons (19+ minutes per game each year) and was headed for what might have been a reasonably lucrative salary arbitration hearing. That won’t end up happening, though, as he agreed to a hefty four-year, $12 million deal today. Here are some details about the contract and the negotiation process between the two sides via Aaron Portzline of the Columbus Post-Dispatch.

Methot, a restricted free agent, had filed for salary arbitration with the NHL by today’s 5 p.m. deadline, but that was strictly a procedural move. He made it clear to his agent, Larry Kelly, that he wanted to get a deal done quickly.

The deal will pay Methot $2.25 million this season, followed by $2.75 million in 2012-13, $3.25 million in 2013-14 and $3.75 million in 2014-15. He could have been an unrestricted free agent next summer.

“This is where I want to be and where I want to play,” Methot said. “I’m comfortable here. I’m excited about where this team is headed, and I really wanted to make sure I was a part of that. I’ve made a lot of friends in Columbus, even outside of the hockey world.

“Giving up the free agency years was pretty easy for me, because I know where I want to be.”

My initial reaction to the deal probably matched a lot of other peoples’ feelings: “Yuck.” That being said, his annual salary isn’t that far out of line with players of his ilk. He’s the hockey equivalent of an “innings eating pitcher,” a guy who won’t wow you but can play a lot of minutes and be reasonably responsible in his own end.

Blue Jackets blog The Cannon described his better-than-expected impact on the team’s 2010-11 season.

Marc Methot turned out to be a surprising gem under Scott Arniel, logging 20 minutes a night (and averaging more time on the PK than any d-man except Klesla) and frequently laid his body on the line at both ends of the ice. Methot lead the Jackets’ D-corps with 176 hits, and came in fourth in blocked shots with 98. Though he was the only d-man not to score a goal, he was also the only d-man who saw virtually no time on the power play – a bit surprising when you think of how many combinations Scott Arniel went through trying to find a winning formula.

Though he had his share of bad plays and gaffes, he was still one of only four Jackets’ d-men to finish with a positive +/- rating (and the only one who played in Columbus the entire season). Interestingly, over half of his PIMs this year came against Chicago and St. Louis, including both of his fighting majors this season. Think he’s bought into the rivalry?

If nothing else, the Blue Jackets are clearly buying into him (and their ability to actually become serious rivals to the Blackhawks, Blues and any other number of NHL teams).

Video: Predators even series with Sharks after franchise-record triple OT thriller

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The marathon is over. The Nashville Predators are back in the series.

The Predators have evened their best-of-seven second-round series with the San Jose Sharks at two-games apiece after Mike Fisher finally broke the deadlock with 8:48 remaining in the third overtime of an instant classic in these 2016 Stanley Cup playoffs.

Fisher buried a rebound in front of the San Jose net to give the Predators a massive 4-3 win on home ice.

The goal capped off a frenetic (and lengthy) overtime session that was nothing but utter chaos at times in the opening extra frame. By the end, Fisher was almost too exhausted to describe the winner. Can you blame him?

Twice, the Sharks, who could’ve put the Predators on the brink of elimination with a win, thought they had scored the winner. Joel Ward couldn’t quite bury a wrap-around attempt before just about every player on the ice, it seemed, converged in the Nashville crease — some working to put the puck in the net, others working to keep the puck out.

The puck, somehow, never crossed the line, though some members of the Sharks raised their arms in celebration as if they had the decisive goal.

Later in the first OT period, the Sharks again thought they had won the game, only to have a lengthy and controversial review determine Joe Pavelski “…made incidental contact with Nashville goaltender Pekka Rinne before the puck crossed the goal line, preventing Rinne from doing his job in the crease,” according to the league.

Adding to it all, the Predators were unsuccessful on two OT power plays. That opened the door for the Sharks, who were awarded power plays on two Shea Weber penalties in overtime but also couldn’t capitalize.

The Predators were less than five minutes away from losing this game in regulation, and going down 3-1 in the series, before James Neal tied it with 4:21 remaining.

‘We earned it,’ says Spezza after Stars regroup to even series with Blues

St. Louis Blues goalie Jake Allen (34) looks on as Dallas Stars forward Jason Spezza, second from right, is congratulated by teammates after scoring a goal during the second period of an NHL hockey game Saturday, March 12, 2016, in Dallas. (AP Photo/Brandon Wade)
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The Dallas Stars faced the possibility of going home facing elimination. That was the scenario Thursday, as the Stars battled the St. Louis Blues in Game 4.

The previous game didn’t go well at all for the Stars. They were thumped 6-1, as things turned nasty between the two teams, and, most importantly, they fell behind in the series. There were serious questions surrounding their goalie duo that includes Kari Lehtonen and Antti Niemi. And Tyler Seguin was ruled out for Game 4.

Yes, things weren’t working in favor of the Stars.

But after a poor start in the opening period Thursday, the Stars fought back with Cody Eakin playing the unlikely overtime hero in a crucial Game 4 win. And Lehtonen was able to settle in after allowing that Vladimir Tarasenko goal in the opening period, stopping 24 of 26 shots.

“You really do have to stay level,” Jason Spezza told the Dallas Morning News.

“It’s the best two-of-three now, it’s momentum swings. We survived some breakaways, and the last two periods we played right and we earned it.”

Video: Game 4 overtime between Sharks and Predators has been utter chaos

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Overtime between the Nashville Predators and San Jose Sharks in Game 4 has been, simply put, crazy.

Take, for instance, this goal-mouth scramble around the Predators crease in which Joel Ward couldn’t convert on the wrap-around and the sequence turned into a full-on scrum as players for both teams fought desperately to either score or somehow keep the puck out of the net. Somehow, the puck stays out.

The Predators need a win to even the series. The Sharks can put the Predators on the brink of elimination with a win.

Oh, and the controversial video review as the Sharks thought they had the winner, as Joe Pavelski swept the puck into the net after a collision with Pekka Rinne.

Here’s an explanation from the NHL Situation Room:

At 7:34 of overtime in the Sharks/Predators game, the Situation Room initiated a review under the terms of a Coach’s Challenge to review the “Interference on the Goalkeeper” decision that resulted in a “no goal” call.

After reviewing all available replays and consulting with NHL Hockey Operations staff, the Referee confirmed that San Jose’s Joe Pavelski made incidental contact with Nashville goaltender Pekka Rinne before the puck crossed the goal line, preventing Rinne from doing his job in the crease.

Therefore the original call stands – no goal San Jose Sharks.

Cody Eakin plays unlikely hero as Stars even series with Blues thanks to OT win

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Needing a win to even the series with the St. Louis Blues, the Dallas Stars didn’t get off to the greatest start Thursday.

On a rather embarrassing play in the first period of a crucial Game 4, the Stars were caught on the television feed clearly with six skaters on the ice, but still surrendered a breakaway goal on a stretch pass to a wide open Vladimir Tarasenko — 1-0 Blues. Again, not a great start for the Stars.

Sometimes in hockey, it’s apparently not always about how you start but how you finish. The Stars gained strength during the second period on goals from Radek Faksa and Patrick Sharp just 1:09 apart. Early in overtime, Cody Eakin scored his first goal of these playoffs to give the Stars a 3-2 win.

This series is now tied heading back to Dallas for Game 5. For the Blues, it’s a missed opportunity to put the high-flying Stars on the brink of elimination.

Eakin snapped a 17-game scoring drought that stretched into late-March of the regular season by going top shelf, short side of Blues goalie Brian Elliott just 2:58 into the extra period.

Jamie Benn and Patrick Sharp each had two-point nights for Dallas, assisting on the game winning goal.