Christian Ehrhoff

The Terry Pegula effect: Sabres sign Christian Ehrhoff to 10-year, $40M deal

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Apparently Christian Ehrhoff received some good feedback about Buffalo, because it looks like he will play hockey there for a long time.

The Associated Press reports that the hard-shooting German defenseman signed a mammoth 10-year, $40 million contract with the Buffalo Sabres today. This signing comes after they shipped their 2012 fourth round pick to the New York Islanders for his exclusive negotiating rights.

Note: See the bottom of this post for a detailed breakdown of the structure of his new deal.

Instant analysis of the contract

Let’s make no mistake about it: this is a monster deal, especially from the perspective of term. Ehrhoff will turn 29 on July 6, so this early birthday present of a contract will probably cover the rest (or at least most) of his remaining playing days. Honestly, it’s difficult to avoid feeling a little anxious about giving any player a deal for such a long time in a violent sport like hockey, especially when he’s halfway through his career. Calling this deal risky is an understatement.

The greatest perk of these decade-long contracts is how much they dilute a player’s salary cap hit, though. Only Ehrhoff’s sternest critics would deny that $4 million is a bargain for a defenseman who just produced a 50-point season and scored at least 40 points in two other campaigns. Ehrhoff averaged just a second less than 24 minutes per game on the juggernaut Vancouver Canucks team, so his big picture value should be obvious even if he remains flawed in a few areas. Some people might debate this point, but his skill set and resume probably would have made him the top target among unrestricted free agent defensemen if he got that far.

The impact of adding Ehrhoff and Regehr

Interestingly enough, both of the Sabres’ new defensemen will register $4 million per year salary cap hits and were acquired in part because of trades. Buffalo added Robyn Regehr and his $4.02 million cap hit (which expires after the 2012-13 season) via a trade with the Calgary Flames and traded for Ehrhoff’s negotiating rights to get this deal done. The two defensemen add opposing elements to a Sabres defense that was very lacking in 2010-11; Regehr is a rugged, stay-at-home defenseman while Ehrhoff’s game is geared more toward puck movement and scoring points.

With Regehr and Ehrhoff primed to take top pairing (or at least top four) roles going forward, 2009-10 Calder Trophy winner Tyler Myers can assume a more comfortable position with the team. Some said that Myers suffered a “sophomore slump” after that great rookie campaign, yet if you ask me, the Sabres stretched super-tall defenseman too thin. Now he can grow into his role as the team’s blueliner of the future (with Ehrhoff, apparently).

Conclusions

There’s a chance that this signing might remove Buffalo as a dark horse candidate in the Brad Richards sweepstakes. Adding Ehrhoff’s expected $4 million cap hit brings the Sabres’ cap space to about $7 million and they need to fill 3-6 roster spots.

That being said, if the opportunity comes along, it wouldn’t be shocking if the Sabres made another bold move or two. It’s clear that Pegula is willing to spend big – and take some risks – to make the team better. We’ll see if their gambles pay off next season … and in the case of Ehrhoff, maybe for the nine seasons that follow as well.

The year-by-year structure of the deal

TSN’s Bob McKenzie provided a breakdown of the year-by-year structure of the deal. I altered it slightly to make it easy to read.

Year 1: $8 million signing bonus, $2 million salary
Year 2: $5M signing bonus, $3M salary
Year 3: $4M
Year 4: $4M
Year 5: $4M
Year 6: $4M
Year 7: $3M
Year 8: $1M
Year 9: $1M
Year 10: $1M
*McKenzie notes that the deal will have a “modified” no-movement clause.

As you can see, the contract is front-loaded as expected. The Sabres might be able to trade him (if they can get around the clause) to a poorer NHL team between years 7-10 because his low salary and $4 million cap hit would help them reach the salary cap floor. Of course, there’s the other alternative: Ehrhoff might retire before his contract expires, which would make his cap hit go away under the current Collective Bargaining Agreement.

Yeo was ‘disappointed’ to see Hoppy the rabbit holding a ‘YEO MUST GO’ sign

Minnesota Wild head coach Mike Yeo argues a call in the second period of an NHL hockey game against the Nashville Predators Tuesday, March 17, 2015, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
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Thing have gone from bad to weird in Minnesota, where embattled Wild coach Mike Yeo was “disappointed” to see Zenon Konopka’s rabbit holding a sign that read, “YEO MUST GO.”

Hey, we told you things had gotten weird.

Konopka, a former Wild player, took to Twitter last night after Minnesota’s latest loss.

Here’s what Konopka tweeted:

And what did Yeo think about that?

“I really don’t care what he says,” he told the Star Tribune, apparently adding with a laugh, “I will say I was very disappointed to see Hoppy holding that sign.”

Now, according to the newspaper’s Michael Russo, “Konopka and Yeo had a lot of issues behind the scenes and that’s why [Konopka] ended up on waivers two Januarys ago.”

Still, that doesn’t change the fact that a lot of Wild fans agree with Hoppy, er, Konopka, and it doesn’t change the fact that the Wild could really, really use a win tomorrow at home to Washington.

Video: Anisimov, Niskanen, McDavid star in Goals of the Week

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Nice work from Artem Anisimov and Matt Niskanen this week, but Connor McDavid‘s tally is on a different level.

You can pretty much bank on McDavid being in Goals of the Year, too. Just saying.

Oilers demote Nilsson, recall AHL standout Brossoit

Edmonton Oilers goalie Anders Nilsson, of Sweden, makes pad save against the Colorado Avalanche during the first period of an NHL hockey game Saturday, Dec. 19, 2015, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
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Laurent Brossoit is getting another crack at the NHL.

On Wednesday, the Oilers announced they demoted Anders Nilsson — who, earlier this year, was carrying the starting gig in Edmonton — and recalled Brossoit from AHL Bakersfield.

Brossoit, 22, is an interesting story. Taken in the sixth round of the 2011 draft (164th overall), he’s really made strides over the last year. He made his big-league debut at the end of last season and performed extremely well, making 49 saves on 51 shots in a loss to San Jose.

This year, Brossoit was named an AHL All-Star. He’s posted a 14-8-3 record for the Condors thus far, with a 2.70 GAA and .921 save percentage.

As for Nilsson, his demotion comes after losing the starting gig to Cam Talbot. Nilsson has also struggled to find the good form shown in November, when he made 10 starts and posted a .915 save percentage.

In his last outing, the lanky Swede allowed three goals on 10 shots in an embarrassing 8-1 loss to the Isles.

Should the Bruins be sellers at the deadline?

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Not surprisingly, last night’s 9-2 loss to Milan Lucic and the Kings garnered no shortage of opinions on the state of the Boston Bruins.

For example, here’s CSN New England’s Joe Haggerty:

…the Bruins no longer have the kind of roster that can hold up in a ground-and-pound battle against the best of the West. Their 5-9-3 record against the Western Conference this season is clearly indicative of that. Julien pointed that out on Tuesday after watching his team get shellacked by the Kings and the point is valid: it’s probably time for the Bruins organization, the fans, the media and those around the league to wrap their minds around the concept that this season’s Bruins team can’t be held to the standard of past B’s teams.

They’re younger and quicker in some spots, but they’re also nowhere near as good.

And here’s ESPN’s Scott Burnside:

Yes, Boston owns a wild card spot as of Wednesday morning, but is anyone confident this is a team that can stay there, or make a dent if they get in?

WEEI’s DJ Bean had some thoughts:

Ultimately, the Bruins won’t need to worry about their record against good Western Conference teams because they sure as heck won’t be meeting them in the playoffs this season. Still, games like Tuesday against the Kings and the pre-break finale against the Ducks provide a nice reminder that despite hanging around in the East, the Bruins’ days of dominant play are well behind them. Given that they haven’t developed many young players and their core is only aging, that next wave of greatness could be pretty far away. 

And so too did NESN’s Jack Edwards, who opined during last night’s broadcast, “There has been a talent drain in Boston.”

Edwards was referring (again) to the once-vaunted Bruins defense that has struggled to replace Johnny Boychuk and Dougie Hamilton. Further complicating matters, at 38, Zdeno Chara is the third-oldest defenseman in the league.

Now, granted, it was only one game. Sometimes, a team just lays an egg. The Bruins are still in a good spot to make the playoffs.

That being said, even if they hadn’t lost so badly last night, the pressing question for the B’s would still be what GM Don Sweeney plans to do ahead of the Feb. 29 trade deadline.

Take winger Loui Eriksson, a 30-year-old pending unrestricted free agent who’s enjoying a fine season with 16 goals and 24 assists. He could net the Bruins a nice return.

True, losing Eriksson for picks and/or prospects would make the Bruins weaker in the short term. But with that defense, the reality is that the short term may not be salvageable anyway.

Related: Kevan Miller is not the problem for Bruins, but he does illustrate the problem