Christian Ehrhoff

The Terry Pegula effect: Sabres sign Christian Ehrhoff to 10-year, $40M deal


Apparently Christian Ehrhoff received some good feedback about Buffalo, because it looks like he will play hockey there for a long time.

The Associated Press reports that the hard-shooting German defenseman signed a mammoth 10-year, $40 million contract with the Buffalo Sabres today. This signing comes after they shipped their 2012 fourth round pick to the New York Islanders for his exclusive negotiating rights.

Note: See the bottom of this post for a detailed breakdown of the structure of his new deal.

Instant analysis of the contract

Let’s make no mistake about it: this is a monster deal, especially from the perspective of term. Ehrhoff will turn 29 on July 6, so this early birthday present of a contract will probably cover the rest (or at least most) of his remaining playing days. Honestly, it’s difficult to avoid feeling a little anxious about giving any player a deal for such a long time in a violent sport like hockey, especially when he’s halfway through his career. Calling this deal risky is an understatement.

The greatest perk of these decade-long contracts is how much they dilute a player’s salary cap hit, though. Only Ehrhoff’s sternest critics would deny that $4 million is a bargain for a defenseman who just produced a 50-point season and scored at least 40 points in two other campaigns. Ehrhoff averaged just a second less than 24 minutes per game on the juggernaut Vancouver Canucks team, so his big picture value should be obvious even if he remains flawed in a few areas. Some people might debate this point, but his skill set and resume probably would have made him the top target among unrestricted free agent defensemen if he got that far.

The impact of adding Ehrhoff and Regehr

Interestingly enough, both of the Sabres’ new defensemen will register $4 million per year salary cap hits and were acquired in part because of trades. Buffalo added Robyn Regehr and his $4.02 million cap hit (which expires after the 2012-13 season) via a trade with the Calgary Flames and traded for Ehrhoff’s negotiating rights to get this deal done. The two defensemen add opposing elements to a Sabres defense that was very lacking in 2010-11; Regehr is a rugged, stay-at-home defenseman while Ehrhoff’s game is geared more toward puck movement and scoring points.

With Regehr and Ehrhoff primed to take top pairing (or at least top four) roles going forward, 2009-10 Calder Trophy winner Tyler Myers can assume a more comfortable position with the team. Some said that Myers suffered a “sophomore slump” after that great rookie campaign, yet if you ask me, the Sabres stretched super-tall defenseman too thin. Now he can grow into his role as the team’s blueliner of the future (with Ehrhoff, apparently).


There’s a chance that this signing might remove Buffalo as a dark horse candidate in the Brad Richards sweepstakes. Adding Ehrhoff’s expected $4 million cap hit brings the Sabres’ cap space to about $7 million and they need to fill 3-6 roster spots.

That being said, if the opportunity comes along, it wouldn’t be shocking if the Sabres made another bold move or two. It’s clear that Pegula is willing to spend big – and take some risks – to make the team better. We’ll see if their gambles pay off next season … and in the case of Ehrhoff, maybe for the nine seasons that follow as well.

The year-by-year structure of the deal

TSN’s Bob McKenzie provided a breakdown of the year-by-year structure of the deal. I altered it slightly to make it easy to read.

Year 1: $8 million signing bonus, $2 million salary
Year 2: $5M signing bonus, $3M salary
Year 3: $4M
Year 4: $4M
Year 5: $4M
Year 6: $4M
Year 7: $3M
Year 8: $1M
Year 9: $1M
Year 10: $1M
*McKenzie notes that the deal will have a “modified” no-movement clause.

As you can see, the contract is front-loaded as expected. The Sabres might be able to trade him (if they can get around the clause) to a poorer NHL team between years 7-10 because his low salary and $4 million cap hit would help them reach the salary cap floor. Of course, there’s the other alternative: Ehrhoff might retire before his contract expires, which would make his cap hit go away under the current Collective Bargaining Agreement.

McDavid will center Hall and Slepyshev

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ST. LOUIS (AP) Edmonton Oilers rookie Connor McDavid said he didn’t have any trouble falling asleep on the eve of his professional debut.

But when he woke up on Thursday he said it finally hit him.

“In the days leading up I wasn’t really thinking about it too much,” McDavid said. “Kind of when I woke up this morning, I guess that’s kind of when it hit me that I’ll be playing in my first NHL game. I think that’s when I first realized.”

When the Oilers play at the St. Louis Blues on Thursday night, all eyes will be on the 18-year-old McDavid, the No. 1 overall pick in the draft and the most hyped player to enter the NHL since Sidney Crosby of the Penguins made his debut a decade ago.

Speaking in front of a crowd of reporters on Thursday following his team’s morning skate, the soft-spoken rookie admitted to having some butterflies but said he felt pretty good and was excited to get going.

“It’s just special,” McDavid said of his NHL debut. “I’m living out my dream, so there’s nothing better than that. I’m just really looking forward to tonight.”

McDavid will be centering the Oilers’ second line against the Blues with Taylor Hall on the left wing and Anton Slepyshev on the right. Hall was the No. 1 overall pick in the 2010 draft, while Slepyshev will also be making his NHL debut on Thursday night.

“We all see what he can do in practice and the games,” Hall said of McDavid. “It’s important to remember he’s 18. I’m 23 and I still have bad games. Sidney Crosby is the best player in the world and still has bad games. There’s going to be some trials and some errors, but I think that he’s in a position to succeed and it’s going to be fun to watch him grow.”

Oilers coach Todd McLellan, hired in May after spending seven seasons with the San Jose Sharks, has already gotten accustomed to receiving questions about McDavid.

The first few questions McLellan was asked on Thursday were about the NHL’s most popular newcomer.

“What I’ve found with him is he’s working really hard to just be himself and fit in,” the coach said. “He doesn’t want to be special, he doesn’t want to be treated any differently but he obviously is. He’s trying to adapt to that and he’s doing a very good job of it personally and collectively I think our team has done a good job around him.”

McLellan said there are three levels of pressure surrounding him.

The first is McDavid’s individual expectations, which he is sure are extremely high. The second comes from the rookie’s teammates, coaching staff, organization and city of Edmonton.

“But where it really changes is the national, international and world-wide eyes being on him,” McLellan said. “How does that compare to some of the other players I’ve been around? I haven’t been around an 18-year-old who has had to deal with that. It’s new to all of us.

“I did spend some time talking to Sid (Sidney Crosby) about his experience and even since then the world’s really changed as far as media and social media and that type of stuff. This is a new adventure for everybody involved. I know Connor has the tools to handle the pressure and we’ll do everything we can to help him.”

Bruins’ second line officially goes under the microscope


While much has been written about the Boston Bruins’ depleted defense, there’s also a good amount of intrigue about the forward group, which will look dramatically different tonight compared to last year’s season opener.

Here are the Bruins’ expected lines versus the Jets:

Brad MarchandPatrice BergeronLoui Eriksson
Matt BeleskeyDavid KrejciDavid Pastrnak
Jimmy HayesRyan SpoonerBrett Connolly
Chris KellyJoonas KemppainenZac Rinaldo

The line most under the microscope may be that second one. In today’s Boston Globe, there’s a lengthy story on Krejci. The 29-year-old center with the big contract only played 47 games last season due to injuries. He finished with just 31 points.

So, where is Krejci’s game now?

Then there’s free-agent addition Matt Beleskey, a.k.a. Milan Lucic‘s replacement. Prior to scoring 22 times last year for the Ducks, the 27-year-old Beleskey had never tallied more than 11 goals in a season.

So, is Beleskey a legitimate top-six forward?

On the other wing, it’s David Pastrnak, the 19-year-old who, somewhat surprisingly, emerged as one of the top rookies in the league last year.

So, can Pastrnak take another step forward?

“It’s been a good three plus weeks where we’ve been able to kind of work individually, as a group, as a line, with different players and different personalities,” said coach Claude Julien. “We’re pleased with it. We’re optimistic and we just have to let things work themselves out too.”