2011 NHL Entry Draft - Top Prospects Media Availability

Five things to watch out for during the NHL Draft tonight

Tonight’s NHL Draft from Xcel Energy Center will provide us with storylines for years to come. As it is, the lead up to the draft has already provided its fair share of drama with the trades the Flyers made on Thursday and with everyone getting into the action on Friday night with the first round of the draft (rounds 2-7 take place on Saturday) that can only mean there’s going to be a healthy dose of shenanigans and moves worth the intrigue.

We’ve got a list of five things we’ll be keeping our eyes peeled for during Friday night’s proceedings in St. Paul.

1. How the top five shakes out

This year’s draft is fascinating because there’s not that be-all, end-all #1 guy to be taken first overall. Mock drafts and analysts all have their ideas on who Edmonton should take first with the choices leaning strongly on forward Ryan Nugent-Hopkins or defenseman Adam Larsson. Either player would be an instant boost for an Oilers team that’s trending hard toward youth and already has a great trio in Taylor Hall, Jordan Eberle, and Magnus Paajarvi.

Nugent-Hopkins would add yet another potentially explosive offensive weapon to that young arsenal while Larsson would give them the young defenseman on which to help them continue to build around. Things don’t get any easier to project after Edmonton. Colorado could take Larsson if Edmonton doesn’t or they could be leaning toward Gabriel Landeskog. Florida at #3 could have either of those two or pick from Sean Couturier or Jonathan Huberdeau. New Jersey at four and the Islanders at five will have their choice from who is left or they could go off the map and pick someone else they like better or deal out. It’s always something with the draft.

2. Ryan Smyth being traded and other moves

There’s no doubt that the L.A. Kings will trade Ryan Smyth at some point this weekend to one of Edmonton, Calgary, or Winnipeg. Smyth wants to head back close to Alberta to be closer to his family and the Kings are going to do their part to accommodate him. Calgary is already jumping into discussion but given Smyth’s history with the Oilers, they’ll want to bring him back too. Smyth’s history with Edmonton is strong and his veteran presence would do their host of youth a favor in learning from him.

Calgary would like to tweak out all the fans in Edmonton while adding a net presence guy to help out Jarome Iginla. The issue there for the Flames is how Smyth makes a ton of money against the cap this year. Of course, that’s never stopped them from making an addition in the past so there’s that.

There’s also the chance we’ll see other trades done or completed. Perhaps Robyn Regehr heads to Buffalo finally or other moves come up out of the blue. The draft is where we saw Chris Pronger traded from Anaheim to Philadelphia and going back further than that, deals like Michael Peca to Buffalo. We saw plenty of action yesterday, but there’s always the chance we’ll see more.

3. Winnipeg’s coming out party

When Winnipeg picks at #7 overall, the Xcel Energy Center is going to go bonkers. With Winnipeg being relatively close to St. Paul, the new franchise is going to have a lot of fans in attendance to root on who GM Kevin Cheveldayoff and True North decide to pick to be their first draft choice.

With the virtual confirmation from CBC’s Elliotte Friedman, the team will indeed be called the Jets. When the guys from True North make that declaration along with their pick it will make the Xcel Energy Center go wild. Get used to hearing, “Go Jets Go” all night and season long.

4. Closure of the Phil Kessel trade

While the Boston Bruins won the Stanley Cup this year, they’ll be wrapping up the last of their rewards from the Phil Kessel trade when they pick in the Maple Leafs spot at ninth overall. Last year, the Bruins netted Tyler Seguin second overall thanks to the controversial deal that saw the Leafs give up two first round picks and a second round choice for Kessel. This year the Bruins could be looking to add a defenseman in the draft and there are a few mock drafts out there projecting Kitchener’s Ryan Murphy to be the guy.

As for the Leafs, they’re not shut out of the first round this time around as they’ve acquired two first round picks this time around and will come up late in the round at 25 and 30. Leafs GM Brian Burke has been dangling those picks as trade bait and while doubting Burke can be dangerous, it’s not shaping up well that he’ll get a deal done there.

5. Pure joy and excitement

Having been to the NHL Draft before, the one thing about it that never changes is the pure joy and excitement from the players and their families. I recall in 2009 seeing Colorado’s Matt Duchene walking around Montreal’s Bell Centre by himself after the first round was over. He was waiting on his parents to get done talking with other families there and he was minding his own business with the brand of smile you couldn’t knock off his face with a bat. After all, he was chosen in the first round of the NHL Draft by the team he grew up loving to watch play, how do you beat that? You don’t.

Keep in mind here that everyone picked tonight is about 18 years-old and not everyone jumps right into the NHL. While there’s a few guys throughout the draft that will be able to make the leap right away, most guys taken are going to play in junior or college hockey again next year and perhaps for the next few years. A lot of guys will make it, but others won’t do as well. The one thing they will have, however, is this night. They’ll get to slip on the team jersey and draft hat, pose with team executives and NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman and be rock stars for the night. That brand of pure joy is all part of the fun of the draft so sit back and enjoy it for all that it’s worth.

Alzner: Capitals’ playoff letdown is ‘deep somewhere in our heads’

PITTSBURGH, PA - MAY 10:  Sidney Crosby #87 of the Pittsburgh Penguins shakes hands with Matt Niskanen #2 of the Washington Capitals after the Penguins defeated the Capitals 4-3 in overtime in Game Six of the Eastern Conference Second Round during the 2016 NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs at Consol Energy Center on May 10, 2016 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  (Photo by Justin K. Aller/Getty Images)
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The mood is a “little sour” in the Washington Capitals locker room right now, and the discomfort goes deeper than losing back-to-back games for the first time in more than a year.

With it being early in 2016-17, maybe the Capitals aren’t totally over falling to the Pittsburgh Penguins after a resounding run to the Presidents’ Trophy.

“Last year, we were just so hungry all over the ice, and that’s why we had so much success. We just haven’t been as hungry right now,” Karl Alzner said, according to the Washington Post. “I don’t know if it’s because deep somewhere in our heads, we did that all season long and it still didn’t work for us, so maybe it’s just taking some time to build back up and as the season goes on, we get better. I don’t feel that in the front of my head, but maybe deep in the back, that’s kind of what’s going on. We’re better than how we’ve been playing.”

Credit Alzner for his candor, because that’s a remarkable admission of vulnerability.

Buying in

Not every member of the Capitals look at a few bumps in the road as a bad thing. Braden Holtby told the Washington Post that “a little bit of adversity never hurts to build a team,” and considering the rigors of an 82-game season, he’s likely correct.

As CSN Mid Atlantic notes, Barry Trotz understands the peaks and valleys of a lengthy campaign … but he still expects his players to buy-in.

“We’ve got the right elements to do what we can do. But there has to be a level of everybody [being] all in. You can’t be half in,” Trotz said. ” … You can’t let your foot off the gas in this league or you find yourself in a hole sometimes.”

Climbing that mountain once again

One can relate to the Capitals’ troubles in a way.

A negative type might feel a bit like Sisyphus here, wondering if it’s worth it to roll that boulder up a hill all over again after that playoff loss pushed them down. “We did that all season long and it still didn’t work for us,” as Alzner said.

Maybe the Capitals are over-thinking this a bit.

They have a few days off to ruminate on things, but the compressed three-game road trip coming up might be valuable in demanding all of their thoughts.

It’s tougher to find time for an existential crisis when you face three away contests in Western Canada during just four days. From the sound of things, it might be the perfect type of challenge for this group.

Like all this scoring? Better enjoy it while it lasts

EDMONTON, AB - OCTOBER 12:  Connor McDavid #97 of the Edmonton Oilers celebrates a goal against the Calgary Flames on October 12, 2016 at Rogers Place in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. (Photo by Codie McLachlan/Getty Images)

Just because Wayne Gretzky laced up his skates in an alumni game over the weekend doesn’t mean the NHL is back to the 1980s.

It just feels like it.

Goals are coming fast and furious through the first two weeks of the season, with scoring at a pace that hasn’t been seen in over a decade. Players are scoring an average of 5.98 goals a game, a far cry from the offense-happy days of Gretzky but an increase so far from every other year since 2005-06 when new rules were designed to boost scoring.

An influx of young players, the preseason World Cup of Hockey and more backup goaltenders playing because of injuries have kept red lights flashing around the league.

“Overall, the game is going younger, faster, more skill, so I think everything kind of combines and goes into it,” Arizona Coyotes winger Radim Vrbata said. “I think the penalties are called more now than late in the season last year. That’s normal, so you probably have more power-play goals. And you have all the guys who played at the World Cup, they’re in their midseason form already where normally it would take them a couple games to get going.”

The NHL, hoping to keep its fans entertained, has tried many things to get scoring up, from shrinking goaltending equipment to adopting 3-on-3 overtime. Yet goals have hovered around 5.3 per game over the past five years.

The jump early this season has as much to do with young talent like Edmonton Oilers captain Connor McDavid and Toronto Maple Leafs rookie Auston Matthews as anything else.

McDavid and Matthews lead a wave of 16 teenagers in the NHL right now, players who dazzle with flashy moves and who sometimes aren’t afraid to take a risk and maybe turn the puck over. As hockey trends more toward speed and skill, the game becomes more unpredictable and coaches gain more gray hair.

“You have more skill players in the league, too, so they’re not as conscious with puck management,” Washington Capitals coach Barry Trotz said. “You talk to the coaches probably around the league that might be as much as anything, and (players are) finding the back of the net on those.”

Coyotes coach Dave Tippett joked that it’s a Team North America mentality, referencing the 23-and-under World Cup group that thrived playing end-to-end, fast-paced games and scored at a blistering pace. Beyond just Team North America, the World Cup got many of the league’s elite up to speed to start the year, and Philadelphia forward Pierre-Edouard Bellemare believes he and the other 168 players who took part are already in December form.

“It definitely helps,” Flyers teammate Sean Couturier said. “I think guys have been in game situations at such a high pace, high level for a month and a half before the season actually started.”

Eight of the top nine scorers so far this season played in the World Cup, and surprise standout Richard Panik benefited from so many Chicago Blackhawks players being away by making the most of extra ice time in preseason. The Blackhawks are also doing their part to contribute to the goal fest by allowing a league-high 14 of the 138 power-play goals scored through Wednesday.

Carolina Hurricanes coach Bill Peters thinks power-play units are ahead of penalty kills and that five-on-five play is “looser” than usual.

Loose play plus a lot of backup goaltenders in the nets is a recipe for offense. Through 97 games, 61 different goalies have started at least once, compared with 85 in 1,230 games last season.

That’s in part a product of injuries to starters like the Los Angeles Kings’ Jonathan Quick, Boston Bruins’ Tuukka Rask and Arizona’s Mike Smith and also the compressed schedule forced because of the World Cup. Each team will have a five-day “bye week” in January or February.

“I’m sure because we have a lot of back to backs and we have the bye week – the games are probably compressed a little bit more together than it’s been in the last (few) years,” Capitals backup goalie Philipp Grubauer said. “If you’re good and play good and get the right numbers and win the games, I’m sure (backups) will get a few more starts.”

Backups will continue to play, but many around the NHL expect production to slide back to normal as the season wears on. So enjoy the throwback scoring while it lasts.

“I think things will tighten up as we go,” Peters said. “But it’s been enjoyable for the fans.”

Bolts ready to renew ‘budding rivalry’ with Habs

Torrey Mitchell, Ben Bishop
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The Canadiens know at the end of the year they’ll probably be jockeying with the Lightning for playoff positioning and, quite possibly, facing them in the postseason.

The Lightning know it, too.

Which is why tonight’s game has a certain amount of importance to it — yes, even though it’s just two weeks into the regular season.

“Montreal has a really good team,” Bolts head coach Jon Cooper said, per the club website. “Last year was just a speedbump year for them. Marc [Bergevin, GM] has done a great job in retooling the whole team and Mike [Therrien, head coach] does a helluva job behind the bench.

“When teams play each other a couple times in the playoffs, there’s a budding rivalry. We missed each other last year, but I have a feeling the way things are going, we’re probably going to meet up again at some point.”

In 2014, the Bolts were swept by Montreal in the opening playoff round. A year later, Tampa Bay flipped the script by defeating the Habs in the second round, en route to the Stanley Cup Final.

As Cooper mentioned, last year was something of an aberration in Montreal. The Habs are certainly proving as much with their play to start this year.

At 6-0-1, they’re the NHL’s lone undefeated team in regulation. They currently sit first in the league in goals against, fourth in goals for, seventh on the penalty kill and 15th on the power play.

The man advantage is, obviously, the only unit not at or near the top of the league. But Shea Weber‘s play has certainly made the PP more formidable — two goals and an assist with the man advantage thus far — and the group has found the back of the net in five of the last six games.

Speaking of the power play, let’s discuss the Lightning for a moment.

Tampa Bay has been annihilating opponents with the man advantage lately. The league’s third-best PP — clicking at a 30 percent success rate — has scored four times in the last two games. Jonathan Drouin is the leading power play scorer, with three points, but all the usual suspects are chipping in as well: Steve Stamkos, Alex Killorn Nikita Kucherov and Victor Hedman.

The Lightning are neck-and-neck with the Habs in the standings as well. They’re 5-1-0 to start the year, and are coming off consecutive wins over the Senators and Leafs.

So yeah. Tonight’s game should be a good one.

With Lindholm signed, Ducks GM hopes to keep team together

LAS VEGAS, NV - JUNE 24:  Bob Murray of the Anaheim Ducks speaks after being named NHL General Manager of the Year during the 2014 NHL Awards at the Encore Theater at Wynn Las Vegas on June 24, 2014 in Las Vegas, Nevada.  (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

Just because they got Hampus Lindholm signed doesn’t mean the Anaheim Ducks need to make a trade right away.

First of all, the 22-year-old defenseman won’t be able to play until he gets a work visa, and that could take a week or two.

Secondly, even when he’s back in the lineup, Simon Despres (who’s got a suspected concussion, which is a “very sensitive issue”) and Nate Thompson (who ruptured his Achilles and may not be back before the trade deadline) will not be.

And with Despres and Thompson on LTIR, GM Bob Murray has some wiggle room, at least for now.

“I wanted to give this group another shot, and I’m going to do everything in my power to keep it that way,” Murray told reporters on a conference call, adding that he was thankful for owners who’ve allowed him to spend to the cap.

Which brings us to Cam Fowler. Here’s what the O.C. Register had to say about him:

Cam Fowler has long been seen as a potential cap casualty once Lindholm signed, but the Ducks do not want to trade him, given Fowler’s ability and meaning to the team. Fowler, who’s off to a hot start with three goals and four assists in eight games, has two years left on his deal at $4 million per season.

The Ducks have gone 3-0-1 since dropping their first four to start the season. Their next game is Friday at home to Columbus.

Related: Fowler surprised he wasn’t traded at draft