PHT makes the case for the Jack Adams Trophy finalists


Despite what many stodgy, humorless people will tell you, a lot of what happens in sports is out of peoples’ control. That’s especially the case in hockey. While NFL coaches micromanage their teams down to every last two-a-day practice, NHL bench bosses can only do so much in the constantly changing game of hockey.

That randomness creates a wild array of subjectivity when it comes to judging their decision making skills, but that’s part of the fun too, right? PHT breaks down the case for the three finalists nominated for the Jack Adams Award.

Joe Yerdon’s case for Dan Bylsma:

Injuries are a part of every coach’s routine in the NHL. You manage, you insert new guys into a lineup that was already clicking for you, and you deal with the fans, press, and team executives who all demand that you keep things going strong even if you’re without a star player. Dan Bylsma had to do all that and then some as he was without Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin for half the year and dealt with injuries to a host of other forwards.

While no one will feel too bad for a guy that coaches two of the best players in the world, keeping the team winning while playing without both of them for most of the year is beyond impressive. From Bylsma’s work to bring guys up to the AHL to help them blend in well to his work to make the team more of a defensive nightmare to face off against to taking the Penguins to fourth place in the Eastern Conference and one point away from winning the Atlantic Division over the Flyers is beyond impressive. The fact that the Pens won 49 games in spite of all the hardship makes him more than worthy of the Jack Adams Trophy.

Matt Reitz’s case for Barry Trotz:

Quick, name a forward on the Nashville Predators NOT named Mike Fisher.  Now think about the player you just selected—is that the kind of player you’d expect to lead a team to about 100 points each season?  There’s no way to look at the Predators’ crop of forwards and not wonder how they do it.  Their big free agent acquisition played two games for the Preds before he was knocked out for the season with a concussion.  Marcel Goc, Steve Sullivan, and Cal O’Reilly may not sound like big injuries—but these are some of Nashville’s most important forwards.  Still, Barry Trotz was able to have his entire team buy into their defense-first system and simply won games.  If anything, Trotz is a victim of  his own success. He’s done a great job for so long in Nashville that people just take it for granted.  But this season may have been his best.  The team was a contender in the tough Western Conference for one reason—they played like a team.

Honestly, he could win this award every season.  Sooner or later people will realize just how important Trotz is to the Nashville organization.  Take him away from the team and what do the Predators have?  On talent alone, they’re a lottery team.  With him, they’re a Western Conference contender.

James O’Brien’s case for Alain Vigneault:

In almost every team sport, people fall into “Bad News Bears” syndrome. Writers gravitate to the “big story,” so it only makes sense that they love it when a coach pushes an underdog bunch to relevance. Believe it or not, though, sometimes the best coach works with the best team and I believe that was the case with Vigneault this season.

His Canucks team lead the league in scoring, allowed the least amount of goals and was outstanding on the power play. They were a success by just about every regular season metric.

Looking past those impressive numbers, Vigneault navigated through defensive injury after injury and his team kept beating up opponents even after clinching everything. Aside from yawning through a couple games late in the season against Edmonton, the Canucks routinely beat desperate playoff teams when they had little to play for. That resilience through injuries and steady focus indicates a great group of players, for sure, but it also reveals a coach who captures his players’ attention.

Canucks say Markstrom (hamstring) out another week — could it be longer?

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Bit of uncertainty out of Vancouver regarding the health of backup goalie Jacob Markstrom.

Markstrom, a late drop from the Canucks’ 5-1 opening-night win over Calgary, has suffered a hamstring injury that will keep him sidelined for another week, the club announced on Thursday.

With Markstrom out, backup duties will stay with AHL call-up Richard Bachman, who served as Ryan Miller‘s No. 2 on Wednesday.

Now, the focus turns to how long Bachman keeps those duties.

Per a Sportsnet report, Markstrom could miss up to three weeks of action with his injury. If that’s the case, Bachman will almost certainly be called into action; the Canucks will play eight games in 17 nights starting with Saturday’s home-opener against the Flames, which includes back-to-backs in Los Angeles and Anaheim on Oct. 12 and 13.

It would be asking a lot of the No. 1, 35-year-old Ryan Miller, to shoulder that entire load.

Bachman does have some NHL experience, with nearly 50 games to his credit. That includes a 3-2-0 record with the Oilers last year, in which he posted a 2.84 GAA and .911 save percentage.

McDavid will center Hall and Slepyshev

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ST. LOUIS (AP) Edmonton Oilers rookie Connor McDavid said he didn’t have any trouble falling asleep on the eve of his professional debut.

But when he woke up on Thursday he said it finally hit him.

“In the days leading up I wasn’t really thinking about it too much,” McDavid said. “Kind of when I woke up this morning, I guess that’s kind of when it hit me that I’ll be playing in my first NHL game. I think that’s when I first realized.”

When the Oilers play at the St. Louis Blues on Thursday night, all eyes will be on the 18-year-old McDavid, the No. 1 overall pick in the draft and the most hyped player to enter the NHL since Sidney Crosby of the Penguins made his debut a decade ago.

Speaking in front of a crowd of reporters on Thursday following his team’s morning skate, the soft-spoken rookie admitted to having some butterflies but said he felt pretty good and was excited to get going.

“It’s just special,” McDavid said of his NHL debut. “I’m living out my dream, so there’s nothing better than that. I’m just really looking forward to tonight.”

McDavid will be centering the Oilers’ second line against the Blues with Taylor Hall on the left wing and Anton Slepyshev on the right. Hall was the No. 1 overall pick in the 2010 draft, while Slepyshev will also be making his NHL debut on Thursday night.

“We all see what he can do in practice and the games,” Hall said of McDavid. “It’s important to remember he’s 18. I’m 23 and I still have bad games. Sidney Crosby is the best player in the world and still has bad games. There’s going to be some trials and some errors, but I think that he’s in a position to succeed and it’s going to be fun to watch him grow.”

Oilers coach Todd McLellan, hired in May after spending seven seasons with the San Jose Sharks, has already gotten accustomed to receiving questions about McDavid.

The first few questions McLellan was asked on Thursday were about the NHL’s most popular newcomer.

“What I’ve found with him is he’s working really hard to just be himself and fit in,” the coach said. “He doesn’t want to be special, he doesn’t want to be treated any differently but he obviously is. He’s trying to adapt to that and he’s doing a very good job of it personally and collectively I think our team has done a good job around him.”

McLellan said there are three levels of pressure surrounding him.

The first is McDavid’s individual expectations, which he is sure are extremely high. The second comes from the rookie’s teammates, coaching staff, organization and city of Edmonton.

“But where it really changes is the national, international and world-wide eyes being on him,” McLellan said. “How does that compare to some of the other players I’ve been around? I haven’t been around an 18-year-old who has had to deal with that. It’s new to all of us.

“I did spend some time talking to Sid (Sidney Crosby) about his experience and even since then the world’s really changed as far as media and social media and that type of stuff. This is a new adventure for everybody involved. I know Connor has the tools to handle the pressure and we’ll do everything we can to help him.”