Tim Thomas

Chiarelli talked to Flyers and Capitals about moving Tim Thomas

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On the eve of a Stanley Cup parade traveling down Causeway, we learned just how close Boston’s playoff hero came to wearing another jersey this season. Rewind to the beginning of the season and there were plenty of questions about Tim Thomas’ age, health, and spot on this Bruins team. The 2009 Vezina Trophy winner was coming off an injury plagued season that saw him lose his starting job to the promising Tuukka Rask. After Thomas’ historic season, it’s hard to remember the questionable circumstances in which the season started for the veteran. Luckily for the Bruins (and their fans), GM Peter Chiarelli had faith that Thomas would rebound this season.

In fact, opposing general managers were inquiring about his availability before the season—including two talented Eastern Conference rivals. Joe Haggerty from CSNNE.com spoke to Chiarelli and learned that the Flyers and Capitals both had preliminary interest in acquiring Thomas.

“Chiarelli admitted on Friday morning he’d taken phone calls about Tim Thomas, and sources indicated then to CSNNE.com that the most seriously interested parties were Washington and Philadelphia. The Bruins and Flyers had casually discussed a deal involving Thomas to the Flyers while the goalie was recovering from hip surgery after losing his playoff starting role to a younger goaltending model in Tuukka Rask.

But the two teams couldn’t agree on fair trade value for Thomas (the Bruins wanted Jeff Carter, and the Flyers were only willing to unload Simon Gagne), though Philadelphia was the place Thomas wanted to be if he was going to be moved.”

Needless to say, acquiring Thomas would have solved all of the Flyers goaltending problems this season. They wouldn’t be negotiating with the Ilya Bryzgalov this offseason and they wouldn’t have had to rush Sergei Bobrovsky into a starting role. Let’s face it—the Flyers with Tim Thomas would have been an absolute beast of a team and probably would have been on the other end of the 4-0 sweep against the Bruins in the playoffs.

The Capitals also could have used a veteran on their team—both between the pipes to help their trio of young goaltenders and also in their locker room. Bruins players have said over the course of the season that Thomas was a calming influence on the ice when the opponents were pressuring. That same calming influence was exactly what the Caps needed against the Tampa Bay Lightning in the second round. Instead, they went with their young goaltenders, had the best regular season record in the East again, and still have no more answers today than they did at the beginning of the season.

Peter Chiarelli spoke about trade offers from other teams and how close he was to moving the Conn Smythe Trophy winner before the season started:

“Not really (close). If you can recall at the time there was a kind of a mutual agreement between myself and Tim [Thomas] and Bill Zito to explore [a trade] on the premise that Tim does not want to leave Boston. That’s really where it ended. It’s really where it ended.

“There were some calls in that and they kept him in the loop at all times. He kept stressing he didn’t want to leave. And I said ‘I know… let’s just look at this very briefly.’ I know there are a lot of stories that flowed from it, but I can’t stress enough the fact that Tim never wanted to leave. I wouldn’t be doing my job if I at least didn’t look at some things, and I did. You go through those things on a number of fronts with a number of players. You just field stuff. You look at them and you talk to other teams. At the end of the day you make the decision ‘yay or nay’. And here it was ‘nay.’ It was an easy ‘nay.’

Glad to hear it was an easy decision for Chiarelli. The only numbers better than Tim Thomas’ stats during the regular season were his stats in the playoffs. In the regular season, Thomas posted a 35-11-9 record with a 2.00 goals against average and .938 save percentage. The numbers were good enough to earn him an invitation to Las Vegas as a Vezina finalist—and unless a meteor hits The Palms, he’ll walk away with his second trophy in the last three seasons. His major competitor this season wasn’t someone playing for another team, but someone playing in a different era. Even Dominik Hasek would have been impressed by Thomas’ regular season.

In the playoffs, Thomas did one better. En route to winning the Conn Smythe Trophy, he actually improved upon his regular season stats. The 1.98 goals against average and .940 save percentage will have people talking about his postseason for years to come.

Simply stated: he had one of the most dominant seasons the NHL has ever seen. Bruins fans are undoubtedly happy that he did it in Boston.

Video: Penguins coach takes issue with late, high Orpik hit on Maatta

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The Pittsburgh Penguins have spoken out against a late, high hit that Washington Capitals defenseman Brooks Orpik threw on Olli Maatta early in the first period of an eventful Game 2 on Saturday.

Maatta left and didn’t return. He played only 31 seconds, and the Penguins were reduced to five defensemen for a large portion of the game. Orpik was given a minor penalty on the play, but the league’s Department of Player Safety may see it differently.

The hit occurred well after Maatta had gotten rid of the puck. He struggled on his way to the dressing room for further evaluation.

Based on multiple reports, Orpik wasn’t made available to the media following the game, which went to the Penguins as they earned the split on the road.

But the Penguins have taken issue with the hit.

“I thought it was a late hit,” said Penguins coach Mike Sullivan, as per CSN Mid-Atlantic. “I thought it was a target to his head. I think it’s the type of hit everyone in hockey is trying to remove from the game.”

Game on: Penguins even series with rival Capitals

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The Pittsburgh Penguins will head back home with a split of their second-round series with the rival Washington Capitals.

Former Capitals forward Eric Fehr came back to burn his hold team, as he scored with under five minutes remaining in regulation to help lift the Penguins over Washington with a 2-1 victory in an eventful Game 2 on Saturday. Evgeni Malkin threw the puck toward the net and Fehr was able to re-direct it by Braden Holtby.

Oh, this was an eventful game, indeed.

It started early in the first period with Capitals defenseman Brooks Orpik catching Penguins blue liner Olli Maatta with a late and high hit that warranted — at least for now — only a minor penalty for interference. Maatta, clearly in distress following the hit, didn’t play another shift and saw only 31 seconds of ice time in total, as Pittsburgh was reduced to five defensemen for the remainder of the game.

It continued in the third period. Kris Letang was furious after getting called for a trip on Justin Williams, and even more ticked off when the Capitals tied the game on the ensuing power play.

For two periods, the Capitals couldn’t get much going. Only four of their players had registered a shot on goal through 40 minutes, while the Penguins held the edge in that department and held the lead.

Washington came out with more jump in the third period, testing rookie netminder Matt Murray with 14 shots in the final 20 minutes. But the Penguins got the late goal to break the deadlock.

Video: Penguins’ Letang was furious after Capitals tie up Game 2 with power play goal

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Kris Letang watched from the penalty box as the Washington Capitals tied up Game 2 with a power play goal in the third period. The Pittsburgh Penguins defenseman was called for tripping after he appeared to muscle Justin Williams off the puck as he entered the zone.

Letang let his disagreement with the call be known at the time, and was furious after the Capitals capitalized on a goal from Marcus Johansson.

The Capitals started the period down a goal and being outshot 28-10 by the Penguins, who need a win to even the series.

Also, it seems this is worth mentioning:

Video: Hagelin goes top shelf to give Penguins the lead in Game 2

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In their quest to even the series, the Pittsburgh Penguins had done a nice job through two periods of suffocating the Washington Capitals, while gaining the lead on a beautiful goal.

Carl Hagelin took advantage of a vast amount of space that opened up in front of the Washington net, finishing off a nice pass from Nick Bonino, burying his shot just under the cross bar on the glove side of Braden Holtby.

Through two periods, the Penguins were outshooting Washington 28-10. Only four Capitals players — Alex Ovechkin, T.J. Oshie, Evgeny Kuznetsov and Matt Niskanen — had registered shots on goal.