Discussing the potential downsides to winning the Stanley Cup


One of the key facets to being successful in competitive fields is to remain hungry. It’s an underrated attitude, too, when you consider the fact that many athletes already achieved the dream of making millions by playing the sports they loved (or at least succeeded at) as children.

PHT already took a more black-and-white look at how both the Boston Bruins and Vancouver Canucks might look once the 2011 Stanley Cup finals conclude, but Kevin McGran wonders about the “downside” of winning a championship.

It probably seems like a ludicrous point to discuss on first impact. After all, the Canucks are desperate to win their first Stanley Cup in their 40-year franchise history while the Bruins haven’t sipped from Lord Stanley’s chalice since 1972. That being said, fans don’t want to see the party end after one great run, so each team would need to avoid some legitimate pitfalls to keep the momentum going.

The dangers of complacency

McGran’s point doesn’t focus on the exhilaration of winning it all, though. Instead, he wonders about the negative side of crossing the finish line in first place.

For the business of the team, well in the short term, it’s fantastic — new fans, inflated TV ratings, merchandise sales. If they’re smart, they’ll lock in sponsors at inflated rates to long-term deals.

But in the long term, there’s evidence to suggest winning the championship is bad for business. Ownership can lose interest, or sell. Management can get lazy.

“It’s like collecting,” said Detlev Zwick, associate professor of marketing professor at the Schulich School of Business at York University. “The collector is enthralled with collecting, as long as the collection is not complete. As soon as the collection is complete, the collection loses its magical power.

“A complete collection is the worst thing that can happen.”

The concept reminds me of how people explain the disappointing later careers of great comedians such as Eddie Murphy. Getting fat and happy might be the ultimate goal, but what happens when you cannot relate to your audience any longer? For some comedians, it means collecting paychecks while making lackadaisical family comedies until people aren’t even sad that you aren’t trying anymore.

McGran’s piece focuses on the downfalls that come once the thrill of that first chase is gone, but the article might miss the biggest problem that comes with winning a championship: keeping that team together.

If you can’t beat them, chip away at them …

Just look at the Chicago Blackhawks franchise, whose losses cannot be contributed to the salary cap alone. Obviously some of the biggest blows came from being forced to trade or release players such as Antti Niemi, Dustin Byfuglien and Andrew Ladd, but other teams scavenged their executives as well. Coaches like Craig Ramsay and decision makers such as Rick Dudley and Kevin Cheveldayoff received better jobs elsewhere when teams hoped to get their own piece of the Blackhawks magic.

Is it a breakthrough or a mirage?

Another difficult aspect is assessing players who put together unexpectedly strong runs in the playoffs. Are these runs a sign of things to come or do they rank as contract year mirages?

Both the Bruins and Canucks have their most crucial pieces wrapped up for next season, so they shouldn’t deal with too many huge losses. That doesn’t mean they won’t have some questions to answer, though. The Bruins were probably more comfortable with the idea of parting with Michael Ryder – and the same could probably be said of the Canucks with Kevin Bieksa – before the two made a difference in the postseason.


Then again, losing in a title round can be even more painful. While the Pittsburgh Penguins rebounded a year after losing a Cup finals series to win it in 2009, most of the teams who got oh-so-close recently haven’t been back since. Just look at how the Ottawa Senators, Calgary Flames and Edmonton Oilers flopped after coming 1-4 wins short and you’ll see that it might be tougher for the second place teams.

Like we discussed before, both teams are built for solid stability (especially the Bruins, who face only a few tough free agent situations) on paper. That being said, complacency can be a real problem in a sport with such small margins of error. These thoughts won’t creep into the minds of the winning team as they spray each other with victory champagne, but maybe they should make it a point to bask in its sweet flavor as much as possible. After all, there’s no guarantee they’ll be anywhere close to this point again.

(H/T to Kukla’s Korner.)

The Buzzer: Shutouts for three, Dubnyk gets win No. 200

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Players of the Night:

Tuukka Rask, Boston Bruins, Keith Kinkaid, New Jersey Devils and Curtis McElhinney, Toronto Maple Leafs: Where do we begin on the night of the shutout? Rask didn’t have a particularly busy night making 23 saves, but when you’re facing names like Kucherov and Stamkos, it’s always dangerous. Still, Rask kept rolling along. He is 27-3-2 in his past 32 starts. That’s just silly. … Kinkaid, meanwhile stopped 38 — including 19 in the first period — in a 3-0 win against the Kings for his fourth career shutout. … No Frederik Andersen for Toronto? No problem. McElhinney stepped in and pitched a 33-save performance as the Leafs down the Montreal Canadiens 4-0.

Alex Pietrangelo, St. Louis Blues: The Blues defenseman scored twice in regulation and then assisted on Brayden Schenn‘s overtime winner to cap off a three-point night.

Devan Dubnyk, Minnesota Wild: While he didn’t get a shutout, Dubnyk did stop 30 of 31 en route to his 200th career NHL win. The win was also important for the Wild, who moved to within five points of the Winnipeg Jets for second place in the Central Division, and moved five points ahead of the Dallas Stars and Colorado Avalanche for third place.

Highlights of the Night:

Filthy pass:

First-goal celebrations are always the best:

Voracek with a slick move in front:

Save of the year candidate:

Factoids of the Night:

Home is where the wins are:

A legend passes a legend:

Believe in McJesus:

Scary Scenes of the Night:


Sabres 5, Blackhawks 3

Oilers 4, Panthers 2

Devils 3, Kings 0

Maple Leafs 4, Canadiens 0

Bruins 3, Lightning 0

Flyers 4, Hurricanes 2

Blue Jackets 2, Senators 1

Blue 4, Rangers 3 (OT)

Wild 3, Coyotes 1

Sharks 5, Canucks 3

Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Senators’ Ryan Dzingel drilled in the head with a puck (video)

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We already saw one lacerated leg, and now we have a one-timer drilling a player in the back of the helmet.

Saturday night hasn’t been so kind.

Ottawa Senators forward Ryan Dzingel was forced to leave the game after some friendly fire against the Columbus Blue Jackets in a 2-1 loss.

Dzingel was drilled in the back of the head from teammate Mike Hoffman‘s one-timer of the back of his helmet around the mid-way point of the third period.

Dzingel remained down for a time but was able to skate off the ice with some assistance from Ottawa’s trainers.

He did not return to the game.

If you watch this closely, you will see Dzingel’s No. 8 on the back of his helmet fly off after contact with the puck.


Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Bruins’ David Backes suffers leg laceration in collision (video)


A scary scene unfolded in the first period between the Tampa Bay Lightning and the visiting Boston Bruins on Saturday night.

David Backes and Yanni Gourde came together in the Lightning crease, with Gourde’s skate appearing to cut Backes on the outside of his right leg.

Backes was able to make his way to the Bruins bench on his own, but he was clutching the back of his leg before getting some help down the tunnel.

Backes did not return to the game.

The Bruins said that Backes suffered a laceration above his right knee, which required several stitches to close.

Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck

Dundon, Hurricanes suspend search for new GM: report


The Carolina Hurricanes’ search for a general manager is on hiatus.

Sportsnet’s John Shannon reported Saturday that the process of replacing former GM Ron Francis is being put on hold for the time being, citing that owner Tom Dundon needs more time.

“Tom hasn’t had the time he needs to do face to face interviews and feels that waiting will pay off,” Shannon wrote in a tweet.

Francis was removed from his post as GM on March 7 and “promoted” to a new role as president of hockey operations. There was only one catch: whoever replaced Francis would bypass the Hurricanes’ legend and report directly to Dundon.

The search, thus far, hasn’t been going that well, with three potential targets already withdrawing any interest they were thought to have had.

Part of that problem could be how hands-on Dundon appears to want to be. Part of it could just be timing. Fenton, for instance, could be on his way to a Stanley Cup ring this year in Nashville.

Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman touched on the situation in a recent 31 Thoughts column.

“I think what I’m looking for, is we have to be comfortable with each other. That’s the most important thing,” Dundon told Friedman when asked what he wants in a new GM. “I actually like to disagree and argue. I don’t want someone to come in and just do what I say, and I don’t want to make decisions. Someone to create a structure of how something is a good idea, and now we are going to get it done.”

You can add Pittsburgh Penguins assistant GM Bill Guerin to the list:

I don’t think it’s a stretch to suggest that Dundon wanting his hands all over the team — including whatever the GM is doing — isn’t the best selling point.

There’s some good, young talent on the Hurricanes for a new GM to come in and build around, but there’s also some dead weight, including what’s turned into a bad contract with goalie Scott Darling.

No GM wants to play puppet for an owner.

TSN’s Pierre LeBrun said the Hurricanes will suspend their search until the summer when a larger crop of candidates reveals itself.

Still, you have to wonder who’ll be willing to take that plunge. Someone will, of course, but people haven’t exactly been lining up to fill the role.

UPDATE: On Headlines on Saturday, Sportsnet’s Nick Kypreos reported that the salary being offered to a prospective GM in Carolina is $400,000, to which he said he doesn’t see any GM taking as it’s too low. Friedman, meanwhile, believes the search for a new GM is not on a complete hiatus.

Scott Billeck is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @scottbilleck