Shawn Thornton

After losing pivotal Game 5, can the Bruins overcome overwhelming odds?


In every series of every sport, people will tell you that each and every game is pivotal. Some will tell you the first game of the series is most important, some will tell you Game 3 is the most important, and everyone will tell you Game 7 is the most important. Aside from the obvious Game 7, Game 5 has proven to be one of the most pivotal games in the Stanley Cup Final over the years. If past trends continue to hold over the next few nights, officials in Vancouver might want to start preparing Robson St. for the biggest party this side of the 2010 Olympics.

The Stanley Cup Final has been tied 2-2 on 21 separate occasions. Of those 21 series, the team that lost Game 5 has only come back to win the series six times. Having a 71% chance might not be a great percentage for a quiz in school; but every fan in the league would jump at a 71% chance to win the Stanley Cup. After Roberto Luongo’s 1-0 shutout in Game 5, those are exactly the odds Canucks fans are looking at today.

Obviously, if the series was already over the Canucks wouldn’t have been forced to jump on the 2,500 mile charter plane this morning. The old adage in hockey is the final game is always the toughest to win. After blowing a 3-0 lead in the first round, no one should have to remind anyone that in Vancouver’s locker room.

Only 6 out of 21 teams coming back may sound daunting, but that’s actually the good news for the Bruins. Some more good news is that even though it has only happened six times in NHL history, it has happened three times in the last decade. The 2001 Colorado Avalanche, 2004 Tampa Bay Lightning, and 2009 Pittsburgh Penguins were all about to survive a pivotal Game 5 loss to come back and win the series in seven. Boston Bruins can take solace in the fact that it has happened before—and it has been happening fairly frequently in recent years.

Now for the bad news. Of the six teams who were able to come back after losing Game 5, only the 1971 Montreal Canadiens and the 2009 Pittsburgh Penguins were able to come back and win Game 7 on the road. Since the Montreal Canadiens were the first team to accomplish the feat in 1950, only five other teams have done it in 61 years.

Stats never tell the entire story—but often times they tell a part of the story we wouldn’t otherwise know. There’s no reason the Bruins can’t come back to win Game 6 and 7 to win the Cup. They’ve been extremely competitive in their three losses and took the Canucks behind the woodshed in both games at TD Garden. Stranger things have happened. But with history as it is, I’d much rather have Vancouver’s odds.

On a new contract, Avs don’t dress Stuart in opener

DENVER, CO - MARCH 14:  Brad Stuart #17 of the Colorado Avalanche looks on as he skates against the Calgary Flames at Pepsi Center on March 14, 2015 in Denver, Colorado. The Avalanche defeated the Flames 3-2.  (Photo by Doug Pensinger/Getty Images)
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Brad Stuart wasn’t on the ice for the first game of his two-year, $7.2 million contract and it had nothing to do with his health.

Avalanche coach Patrick Roy felt Stuart simply wasn’t one of the six best defensemen in training camp and consequently he wasn’t in the lineup, per the Denver Post.

“Things could change for the next game,” Roy offered. “Like I said (Wednesday), we’re going to use those eight D all year long. (Last night was) just the first game of the season.”

Perhaps, but it’s still a terrible indicator, especially given that Stuart will turn 36 on Nov. 6. Stuart is a veteran of over 1,000 games, but now the question is if he has enough left in the tank to provide Colorado with much value.

The Avalanche also scratched defenseman Brandon Gormley, who was acquired from the Coyotes in exchange for Stefan Elliott. The hope was that both players would benefit from the change in scenery. Gormley was taken with the 13th overall pick of the 2010 NHL Entry Draft, but has only played in 32 career NHL games.

PHT Morning Skate: Beat writers survey predicts Ducks will win Cup

Corey Perry, Frederik Andersen
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PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

In a survey of 29 beat writers, the Anaheim Ducks emerged as the clear favorite to win the Stanley Cup. If you’ll recall, they have that in common with the EA Sports simulation. (Boston Globe)

Alex Ovechkin would pick an Olympic hit against Jaromir Jagr as the biggest check of his life. (Russian Machine Never Breaks)

Here are the highlights from Minnesota’s 5-4 victory over Colorado:

The Montreal Canadiens seem committed to using Alex Galchenyuk as a center throughout the 2015-16 campaign. (The Canadian Press)

The NHL recently enlisted its players to read off some not so mean tweets. (USA Today)

Bills coach Rex Ryan talked about the Sabres in Thursday’s press conference. (

Frederik Andersen may have the Anaheim Ducks’ starting job for now, but with John Gibson still a big part of their plans, Andersen has to keep proving himself. (Orange County Register)