Claude Julien

Can Claude Julien maintain his ‘Midas Touch’ in Game 5?

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Whenever one team comes out on top – especially when the results were as uneven as Boston’s two wins over Vancouver were – it makes a coach look brilliant. Moves that would have been subtle and simple seem like strokes of genius if they propel a team to one-sided victories.

While Roberto Luongo’s struggles and the Canucks’ difficulties in finding a proper defensive lineup amid suspensions and injuries cast Alain Vigneault in a poor light, Claude Julien seems to come out smelling like roses.

Even decisions that were once criticized – such as Julien’s reluctance to play Tyler Seguin, which seemed like utter stupidity after two hot games – have been shown to be more logical than expected. Seguin cooled off considerably after that ridiculous six point run in two games, showing that Julien wasn’t totally crazy for scratching him. (Then again, some might argue that Julien simply isn’t giving Seguin the ice time and opportunities he needs to succeed, but that’s a debate for another day.)

While Julien and Vigneault share roots in the Montreal Canadiens organization and are known to be good friends, it seems like Julien is making better moves while Vigneault botched the occasional crucial decision. (One example: Vigneault allowed Luongo to stay in Game 3 when it was 5-1, only to see him allow three more painful goals, taking even more away from his possibly shaken confidence.)

Joe Haggerty goes as far as to say that Julien has had a “Midas touch” in the 2011 Stanley Cup finals.

1) He went with his head and his heart in playing Shawn Thornton during Game 3 to give his team an emotional lift and a dose of much-needed attitude.

2) He rolled the dice a little by taking a chance on Rich Peverley on Boston’s top line in Game 4, and Peverley rewarded the decision with a pair of goals.

It would seem Julien is enjoying the Midas touch over the last few games, and he’ll need to continue if the Bruins are going to bag themselves a road win. While making sure to give a great deal of the credit to the players for the position that the Bruins find themselves in, B’s general manager Peter Chiarelli also points to Julien.

“Everything is magnified in the Finals,” said Chiarelli. “The last change — the significance of the last change is huge, so it’s something we have to battle. But I have confidence in our coach and I have confidence in my players. Those guys have been battling and that’s a testament to the team.”

“[Julien] is doing a good job, and the players are playing too. This is a collective thing. I’ll give credit to Claude for mixing and matching, but the players are also doing terrific in accepting the roles that they’re being placed in.”

Of course, Julien knows better than most how fickle praise can be for NHL head coaches. He was fired from his job with the Canadiens one season after helping the team overachieve their way to playoff berth with a 93-point season, but his most ridiculous firing came with the New Jersey Devils. GM Lou Lamoriello canned him late in his mostly successful first season, which briefly became an odd tradition for the unique executive. Even taking the instability of the job under consideration, few coaches have seen the stark contrast in ups (Jack Adams Trophy during the 08-09 season with Boston) and downs (blowing that 3-0 series lead against the Philadelphia Flyers in last year’s semifinals) quite like Julien.

Ultimately, he’s a steady coach who might help the Bruins upset the mighty Canucks for their first Stanley Cup win since 1972. Let’s face it, too; few things make a coach seem wiser than a gaudy Stanley Cup ring on his finger.

Julien says Lundqvist’s acting ‘doesn’t need to be on the ice’


The goalie interference penalty called on Brad Marchand late in Friday’s Thanksgiving Showdown didn’t sit well with the Bruins.

Marchand, whistled after making contact with New York’s Henrik Lundqvist midway through the third, said he thought “it was a bit of a weak call,” adding “[Lundvqist’s] out of the crease, and he lightly gets touched.”

While Marchand took issue with the call, his head coach took issue with King Henrik.

(In Julien’s defense, Lundqvist does have a pretty lengthy IMDB page.)

The interference penalty was nearly disastrous for the Bruins, as J.T. Miller scored on the ensuing power play to given the Blueshirts a 3-2 edge.

However, Boston replied with a power-play goal of its own — Ryan Spooner, at the 16:14 mark — which set the stage for David Krejci‘s dramatic game-winner with just under two minutes to go.

So, to recap: Today’s game had the Beleskey hit on Stepan, the Marchand-Lundqvist theatrics and a dramatic come-from-behind victory for Boston.

And so, to answer your next question:

These two teams next meet on Monday, Jan. 11, at MSG.

Related: Yep, Alain Vigneault went there — ‘I remember Aaron Rome in this building’

Video: Peluso, Gabriel throw down in spirited heavyweight tilt

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The big boys got after it early in Minnesota today.

Wild forward Kurtis Gabriel — all 6-foot-3 and 220 pounds of him — picked one of the toughest opponents in hockey on Friday, throwing down with Jets enforcer Anthony Peluso early in the first period.

And it was a pretty good tilt.

Peluso, one of the league’s most feared fighters, was coming off two pretty heavy scraps — one against Columbus tough guy Jared Boll, and another in which he landed some serious shots on overmatched Canucks d-man Luca Sbisa:

Of course, Gabriel’s no slouch.

He had one previous fight in the NHL this year (against Peluso’s teammate, Chris Thorburn) and five in the American League, where he’s spent the majority of this season.

Given the fisticuffs that occurred earlier in the Bruins-Rangers game, it seem the NHL has really gotten into the spirit of Black Friday.

(All videos courtesy

Yep, Alain Vigneault went there — ‘I remember Aaron Rome in this building’

Matt Beleskey, Derek Stepan

Alain Vigneault remembers a late hit that happened in Boston one time.

The Rangers’ head coach referenced it today after one of his top centers, Derek Stepan, was injured on a check that the NHL may need to review with a stopwatch.

“I remember Aaron Rome in this building, .6 seconds late, getting suspended four games in the Stanley Cup Final,” Vigneault said, per Pat Leonard of the New York Daily News.

For those that need their memories refreshed (nobody in Vancouver does, that’s for sure), here’s Rome’s late hit that knocked Nathan Horton out of the 2011 final with a concussion:

Now here’s the hit that Matt Beleskey put on Stepan:

According to Vigneault, Stepan has some broken ribs and is out indefinitely.

Over to you, Department of Player Safety.


A league source has confirmed that the hit is being reviewed.

High-flying Bruins (sounds weird to say) beat Rangers for fifth straight win


Somebody tell the Boston Bruins there’s a goal-scoring crisis in the NHL.

This afternoon, for the 14th time this season, a Bruins game featured at least six goals. The final score was 4-3, as Boston came back to beat the Rangers in a wildly entertaining Thanksgiving Showdown on NBC.

David Krejci scored the winner with 1:43 remaining. Krejci’s goal came just 2:03 after teammate Ryan Spooner had tied it on the power play.

The win was the Bruins’ fifth straight. Though the defensive mistakes remain…

…Claude Julien’s troops have been finding ways to overcome them.

The running and gunning Boston Bruins.

When was the last time you could call them that?