Mark Recchi, Zdeno Chara, Michael Ryder, Daniel Paille, Rich Peverley

Did Aaron Rome’s hit on Nathan Horton actually hurt the Canucks more than the Bruins?

On paper, the Vancouver Canucks seemed like the obvious “winners” amid the fallout of Aaron Rome’s hit on Nathan Horton. While the Boston Bruins lost a big, talented top-line forward for the rest of the playoffs (and sadly, perhaps quite a while longer than that), the Canucks lost a marginal depth defenseman.

Of course, professional sports aren’t played in a vacuum. Emotional reactions might cause athletes to make mistakes hear and there, but a pivotal event can also turn the tide of momentum in ways that defy dry statistics and logic.

Joe Haggerty makes the justifiable argument that Rome’s devastating and dirty hit fueled the fire of almost everyone on the Bruins roster. Saying that anger and pride were the main catalysts for Boston’s 12-1 run stretches things a bit – and discounts the undeniable talent on this Bruins team – but there was the sense that the atmosphere was bound to change because of that unsettling moment.

The angry B’s have outscored the Canucks by a 12-1 margin in the five periods since the Rome/Horton incident, and the series is starting to look a great deal like the Bruins/Habs series in 2002 after Kyle McLaren decked Richard Zednik with a head shot and riled up the Habs at exactly wrong time.

The disclaimer is that the series is still just tied at 2-2, and the Bruins still have to win a game in Vancouver. But they’ve clearly taken control of the series by punishing the Western Conference’s best with aggressive physical play and a choking forecheck.

The whole tenor of the series has changed as the Bruins continue to beat up the Canucks and pilfer their lunch money.

As marginal as Aaron Rome can be, it also must be said that Vancouver’s defense is looking awfully shabby in its current state. Looking at price tag alone, it seems ridiculous that Keith Ballard and his $4.25 million salary cap was parked in street clothes so often during the 2011 playoffs. Yet after watching his turnover-filled Game 4 meltdown, it’s pretty clear why Canucks coach Alain Vigneault scratched him for so many playoff games.

Bruins rolled with punches while Canucks struggled to adapt to lineup changes

Is it possible that losing Rome is just as problematic for Vancouver as Horton’s absence might be for Boston? It seems ridiculous considering the disparity in those two players’ talent levels, but Michael Ryder and Rich Peverley have done a nice job of filling that gap so far. Ryder is something of a poor man’s Horton, anyway; he’s smaller and less imposing than Horton, but they both possess a rifle of a right-handed shot. That was on display when Ryder fired a shot past Luongo in Game 4 while Sami Salo failed to close the gap. Peverley brings different skills to the table, but his skating ability and versatility make him a great change-of-pace option if Ryder struggles.

Compare the Bruins’ ability to plug in that gap with Vancouver’s inability to deal with the absence of Rome – but especially top stopper Dan Hamhuis – and one wonders if both teams truly wish that the hit didn’t happen. While plenty of the focus is justifiably centered on the debate to start Roberto Luongo or Cory Schneider in net, neither goalie will be in a position to succeed if the Canucks cannot cut down on their back-breaking turnovers.

Horton’s absence might be more pronounced as the games get bigger

Don’t get me wrong, losing Horton is absolutely tougher than losing Rome. Yet after considering the intangible motivation Boston generated from it and the lineup alterations for both teams, the trade-off may not have been as one-sided as most of us expected.

Of course, one of Horton’s trademarks in the 2011 playoffs was scoring huge goals. As the Stanley Cup finals wind down to what is essentially a three-game series, we’ll see if the Bruins miss him when the games get even bigger.

Preds still haven’t found their scoring touch

Mike Fisher
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The Nashville Predators got off to a relatively good start this season, but something seems to have happened to their offense over the last six games.

Prior to Nov. 20, the Preds had only been shut out once in their first 17 games. Since then, they’ve been blanked three times and have just six goals in their last six contests.

If you remove Mike Fisher from the equation, the numbers are even more dreadful.

Fisher’s scored three of those six goals, while Filip Forsberg, Shea Weber, James Neal and Mike Ribeiro have none.

After Saturday’s 4-1 loss to Buffalo , here’s what coach Peter Laviolette told the Tennessean: “I thought we could’ve had more gas, to be honest with you. The energy just wasn’t there; maybe the second period had something to do with that or the road trip, which was a long trip. I’m not making any excuses, but I think when we play at a higher tempo that’s when we’re at our best, and we had more to push in that area tonight.”

The first game back home after a long road trip is typically a difficult one for most teams, so we’ll see how the Predators respond on Tuesday night when they host Arizona.

A month to remember: Duchene lighting it up in November

Matt Duchene, Nick Holden
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It wasn’t too long ago that a report surfaced saying that the Avalanche were willing to listen to offers on forward Matt Duchene.

When a player’s struggling and rumors start swirling, one of two things tends to happen.

Either the player involved lets it affect his on-ice performance in a negative way or he’s motivated by the trade talk and turns his struggles around.

Instead of pouting, the 24-year-old rolled up his sleeves and got to work.

In October, Duchene scored a goal and an assist in 10 games, but things changed in a hurry when November rolled around.

The Avs forward has picked up at least one point in 11 of 13 games this month.

Duchene has 11 goals and nine assists in November and he still has a game to go before the calendar flips to December.

“Obviously, things completely flip-flopped,” Duchene told the Denver Post. “That’s the coldest start I’ve ever had and things are good right now. Obviously, I know it could go right back, I could go cold again, that’s just the nature of the game. You just have to work every day to keep it going. The most important thing is to be able to provide offense and help the team win.”

PHT Morning Skate: A bride can have her burger and eat it too

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PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

A woman in a wedding dress was caught eating a burger during Saturday’s game between the Stars and Wild. (Above)

Team Europe has a number of quality goaltending options to chose from ahead of next fall’s World Cup of Hockey. (

Watch as some players on Nashville’s roster try to guess the lyrics to different country songs:

Former goaltender Eddie Johnston sits down for a Q & A with’s Shelly Anderson. (ESPN)

Canadiens forward Brendan Gallagher got into a “Twitter war” with former NHLer Jim Kyte. (Puck Daddy)

Oilers defenseman Andrew Ference made a generous donation to a Syrian refugee fund. (Huffington Post)

Julien explains comments about Lundqvist’s ‘acting’

Claude Julien

We’re now over two days removed from last Friday’s tilt between the Bruins and the Rangers, but the coaches from both teams seem unwilling to move on.

Moments after that game, Claude Julien claimed that Henrik Lundqvist did some “acting” on the ice to sell a goalie interference call on Brad Marchand.

On Saturday, Alain Vigneault fired back by saying that Julien needed to get his eyesight checked. Vigneault also compared Aaron Rome’s hit on Nathan Horton in the 2011 Stanley Cup final to Matt Beleskey’s hit on Derek Stepan in Friday’s game.

Now it was Julien’s turn to address the “issue” at hand.

Julien clarified his original comment about Lundqvist and he also tackled some of Vigneault’s comments.

“I think it’s pretty obvious what I said . . . I thought Lundqvist sold it,” said Julien. “Not for a second did I ever question Henrik Lundqvist as a person, or a goaltender or any of that. We all know how good he is as a goaltender, and I know he’s a good person. I’ve met him at the All-Star games and all that stuff.

Julien on his eyesight: “As far as my eyes, I’m not the one that compared Beleskey’s hit to Aaron Rome’s [hit]. We’ll just leave it at that.”

It’s time for both sides to move on.