Mark Recchi, Zdeno Chara, Michael Ryder, Daniel Paille, Rich Peverley

Did Aaron Rome’s hit on Nathan Horton actually hurt the Canucks more than the Bruins?

On paper, the Vancouver Canucks seemed like the obvious “winners” amid the fallout of Aaron Rome’s hit on Nathan Horton. While the Boston Bruins lost a big, talented top-line forward for the rest of the playoffs (and sadly, perhaps quite a while longer than that), the Canucks lost a marginal depth defenseman.

Of course, professional sports aren’t played in a vacuum. Emotional reactions might cause athletes to make mistakes hear and there, but a pivotal event can also turn the tide of momentum in ways that defy dry statistics and logic.

Joe Haggerty makes the justifiable argument that Rome’s devastating and dirty hit fueled the fire of almost everyone on the Bruins roster. Saying that anger and pride were the main catalysts for Boston’s 12-1 run stretches things a bit – and discounts the undeniable talent on this Bruins team – but there was the sense that the atmosphere was bound to change because of that unsettling moment.

The angry B’s have outscored the Canucks by a 12-1 margin in the five periods since the Rome/Horton incident, and the series is starting to look a great deal like the Bruins/Habs series in 2002 after Kyle McLaren decked Richard Zednik with a head shot and riled up the Habs at exactly wrong time.

The disclaimer is that the series is still just tied at 2-2, and the Bruins still have to win a game in Vancouver. But they’ve clearly taken control of the series by punishing the Western Conference’s best with aggressive physical play and a choking forecheck.

The whole tenor of the series has changed as the Bruins continue to beat up the Canucks and pilfer their lunch money.

As marginal as Aaron Rome can be, it also must be said that Vancouver’s defense is looking awfully shabby in its current state. Looking at price tag alone, it seems ridiculous that Keith Ballard and his $4.25 million salary cap was parked in street clothes so often during the 2011 playoffs. Yet after watching his turnover-filled Game 4 meltdown, it’s pretty clear why Canucks coach Alain Vigneault scratched him for so many playoff games.

Bruins rolled with punches while Canucks struggled to adapt to lineup changes

Is it possible that losing Rome is just as problematic for Vancouver as Horton’s absence might be for Boston? It seems ridiculous considering the disparity in those two players’ talent levels, but Michael Ryder and Rich Peverley have done a nice job of filling that gap so far. Ryder is something of a poor man’s Horton, anyway; he’s smaller and less imposing than Horton, but they both possess a rifle of a right-handed shot. That was on display when Ryder fired a shot past Luongo in Game 4 while Sami Salo failed to close the gap. Peverley brings different skills to the table, but his skating ability and versatility make him a great change-of-pace option if Ryder struggles.

Compare the Bruins’ ability to plug in that gap with Vancouver’s inability to deal with the absence of Rome – but especially top stopper Dan Hamhuis – and one wonders if both teams truly wish that the hit didn’t happen. While plenty of the focus is justifiably centered on the debate to start Roberto Luongo or Cory Schneider in net, neither goalie will be in a position to succeed if the Canucks cannot cut down on their back-breaking turnovers.

Horton’s absence might be more pronounced as the games get bigger

Don’t get me wrong, losing Horton is absolutely tougher than losing Rome. Yet after considering the intangible motivation Boston generated from it and the lineup alterations for both teams, the trade-off may not have been as one-sided as most of us expected.

Of course, one of Horton’s trademarks in the 2011 playoffs was scoring huge goals. As the Stanley Cup finals wind down to what is essentially a three-game series, we’ll see if the Bruins miss him when the games get even bigger.

Sens demote former first-rounder Puempel

Matt Puempel
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Looks like Matt Puempel won’t be making the leap after all.

Puempel, the subject of Ottawa’s “looking to make the leap” profile during our Team of the Day series, has been sent down to AHL Binghamton one day prior to the Sens’ opener against Buffalo.

Puempel, taken by Ottawa in the first round (24th overall) at the ’11 draft, made his big-league debut last season and looked as though he’d stick around — only to suffer a high ankle sprain after 13 games, and miss the rest of the season.

The 22-year-old came into this year’s camp looking to secure a full-time position at the big league level, but was beaten out by Shane Prince for the final forward spot on the roster.

To be fair, contract status probably played a role. Prince would’ve had to clear waivers to get down to Bingo, whereas Puempel didn’t.

A former 30-goal scorer in the American League, Puempel is expected to get another look with Ottawa this season.

Report: Torres won’t appeal 41-game suspension


Sounds like Raffi Torres is accepting his punishment.

Per Sportsnet, Torres won’t appeal his 41-game suspension for an illegal hit to the head of Anaheim’s Jakob Silfverberg.

The report comes just days after the NHL’s Department of Player Safety levied one of the longest disciplinary rulings in league history, citing both the severity of the Silfverberg hit and Torres’ lengthy history of suspensions, fines and warnings.

There was some thought, however, that Torres would try to challenge the ruling.


He does have a history of success in that department. In 2012,Torres successfully appealed his suspension for a headshot on Chicago’s Marian Hossa, and had his punishment reduced from 25 games to 21.

Torres also isn’t considered a “repeat offender” under the current collective bargaining agreement, as his last suspension came in 2013.

Of course, part of that clean record is due to the fact he hasn’t played much. Torres has largely been sidelined by injury for the last two seasons, missing all of last year with knee problems.

Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman delved further into the repeat offender thing in his latest 30 Thoughts column:

If you read the relevant sections of the CBA, the league takes the position that the repeat offender status is only applicable to fines. Repeaters are fined on a per-game basis, non-repeaters on a per-day basis. (The former is more expensive, because there are fewer games than days in an NHL season.) However, if you go to Section 18.2, among the factors taken into account are, “the status of the offender and, specifically, whether the Player has a history of being subject to Supplementary Discipline for On-Ice Conduct.”

So, in the NHL’s view, a player’s history is relevant, even if longer than 18 months ago.

Should the report prove accurate and Torres doesn’t appeal, he will be eligible to return to action on Jan. 14, when the Sharks take on the Oilers.