Blue Jackets start reshuffling front office, “strive to build a championship-caliber team”

It’s been a rough couple of seasons for the Columbus. The Blue Jackets finished 13th in the Western Conference this season with only 81 points. It was the second straight season they finished last in the Central Division as they were 14th in the West in 2009-10. Back-to-back catastrophic seasons like those make the 2009 seasons seem like a different era. As the old saying goes, “when the going gets tough, find a scapegoat.” Blue Jackets GM Scott Howson did exactly that when he announced that the organization fired both Director of Pro Scouting Bob Strumm and assistant General Manager Don Boyd. Boyd was the head of amateur scouting for Columbus and has been with the organization since it was formed in 2000.

A simple look at the standings would tell the most casual fan that something needed to be done. Howson gave Aaron Portzline of the Columbus Dispatch his reasons for firing two high ranking front office members:

“When a team does not have success for a long period of time, there’s an expectation that changes will occur. It’s a fact of professional sports. Everything is results-based.

“We’re all responsible for where we are as an organization. We’re all responsible, and we all have to take responsibility.”

At least that was marginally better than the canned quote he offered during the formal announcement:

“We believe it was time to make changes in key areas of our organization as we strive to build a championship-caliber team. I want to thank Don and Bob for their hard work and commitment over the past 12 years as each has made very positive contributions.”

There’s no question that things have been rough in Columbus over the last few seasons. The hope of the franchise’s only playoff experience in 2009 has been replaced with the reality of two pathetic seasons and no end in sight. Unfortunately, the tough time in the standings has spilled into other parts of the organization as well. The team lost $25 million last season and “barring news that ‘moves the needle,’” they’re looking at another season with serious financial loses. They currently sit at 7,000 season tickets sold and hope to go into the season with a total of 8,000. Compare those numbers to Winnipeg’s “Drive to 13”and it’s plain to see that things could be better at the box office.

Obviously this is a move to shake up a team that desperately needs some shaking up. What was once a team that was showing potential only a few short years ago is once again back to their familiar place in the basement of the NHL. If the team continues into next season as currently constructed, is there anyone who thinks they’d be a contender for the Central Division? Would they even be considered a contender for a playoff spot? Remember, this is a team that is still looking for their first playoff victory. Not series victory—the franchise has never won a single playoff game. They can change the pro scouting director and swap out the assistant GM, but sooner or later they’re going to need to bring in some players to re-energize the fanbase. Michael Arace of the Dispatch shares the same thoughts:

“General manager Scott Howson has a window of opportunity. The conventional wisdom is he is offering the No. 8, perhaps in a package, in exchange for immediate help. They need it. How many legitimate top-six forwards do the Jackets have at this point? Two or three? How many top-four defensemen? One? Do they have their goaltender of the future?

These questions inform the goal of the coming weeks, namely, to flesh out on the top end of things – rather than add more fourth-line pluggers and/or No. 6 defensemen. The Jackets need more talent. They may have to be bold to acquire it.”

No matter what the organization chooses to do, they need to do something. Perhaps the front office reshuffling is just the first step as the Blue Jackets try to legitimately change the culture around the franchise. They can make a trade, acquire a defenseman (or four), or be an active participant in free agency. But do something to get the community talking about the Jackets again.

Then again, winning a few more games could help re-energize the fans as well.

Sens avoid arbitration with Dzingel

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The Ottawa Senators have narrowly avoided arbitration with Ryan Dzingel.

Per Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman, Dzingel has signed a two-year deal with a cap hit of $1.8 million.

Dzingel’s hearing was scheduled for today. Last season, the 25-year-old forward had 14 goals and 18 assists in 81 games.

Earlier this week, the Sens also avoided arbitration with Jean-Gabriel Pageau, though that case didn’t go down to the wire like Dzingel’s did.

Pageau and Dzingel were the only Sens with arbitration hearings scheduled.

Related: Sens want to avoid arbitration with Dzingel

 

Palat feels ‘pretty good’ about the Lightning’s chances of bouncing back next season

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Tampa Bay Lightning GM Steve Yzerman accomplished quite a bit this offseason.

Not only did he acquire Mikhail Sergachev for Jonathan Drouin, but he also managed to lose Jason Garrison‘s contract before re-signing Tyler Johnson and Ondrej Palat. They also signed Chris Kunitz and Dan Girardi in free agency.

Even though fitting everyone under the cap couldn’t have been easy, Yzerman managed to get it done, and it has at least some of his players excited about the prospect of next season.

“I feel pretty good about the team,” Palat, who signed a five-year, $26.5 million contract extension last week, told the Tampa Bay Times. “I like all the new guys. They’re in the league for a while. Great veteran guys, experienced guys. That’s what you need to have on your team if you want to win a Cup.”

Going into last season, many people pegged Tampa Bay as one of the teams that would compete for the East Division crown. Not only did they not win the East, they didn’t even qualify for the playoffs. A lot of that had to do with injuries, but there’s no denying that the 2016-17 season was disappointing for the Bolts.

Despite not playing hockey in the spring last season, there seems to be a good amount of optimism surrounding the team’s chances of making a run this year (a healthy Steven Stamkos would help in a big way).

Sure, keeping guys on the ice and off medical tables would increase the odds of the team having a bounce back season, but there’s more to it than that. Outside of a handful of players (mainly Nikita Kucherov), the Lightning didn’t get consistent efforts from a lot of their key players that were healthy.

“It was an experience for us last year because we came from two good (playoff) runs and we thought we were going to make the playoffs just like that, and it didn’t happen,” added Palat. “In the NHL we have to play good from the beginning of the season, and we have to be good all season long.”

PHT Morning Skate: 3 coaches that are on the hot seat going into 2017-18

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–The Hockey News continues their “2020 Vision” series with the Boston Bruins. Thanks to a number of good drafts over the last few years, Boston’s future looks pretty good. They have a number of quality defensemen in their system, which should help get them back into the postseason sooner than later. (The Hockey News)

–It was five years ago this week that Shea Weber signed that huge offer sheet with the Philadelphia Flyers. The Puck Daddy Blog looks at the fallout from that signing five years later. If Nashville doesn’t match the offer, there’s probably no P.K. Subban in Smashville, maybe Peter Laviolette keeps his job in Philadelphia, and maybe the Flyers don’t miss the playoffs as often. (Puck Daddy)

–TSN’s Scott Cullen breaks down NHL goalies in his latest “Statistically Speaking” article. The way he ranks them is by finding out what their expected goals against will be minus the goals they actually give up. No surprise, Carey Price finds himself at the top of the list (minimum 50 games played). Matt Murray, Philipp Grubauer and Andrew Hammond also find themselves in Cullen’s top 10. (TSN.ca)

–Every year, there’s at least a few coaches who get fired during the season. Last season, names like Jack Capuano, Gerard Gallant and Michel Therrien found themselves on the unemployment line. It’ll be interesting to see who gets their walking papers in 2017-18. The Score believes that Winnipeg’s Paul Marice is one of three coaches that will go into next season on the hot seat. (The Score)

–Ryan Poehling was Montreal’s first round pick in the 2017 draft, and he couldn’t have been more excited to land there. The St. Cloud State product was in awe as soon as he stepped foot in Montreal for the first time. The fact that he’s playing in such a passionate hockey city isn’t bad either. “(The fans) all just go crazy and I haven’t even played here, so it’s special. I just got drafted by them and they’re just crazy about me, so I think that’s pretty cool, how I haven’t even proven anything and they still love me.” (NHL.com)

Dominic Moore hosted the sixth annual Smashfest, which is a ping-pong tournament where fans and NHLers come together for all the bragging rights. For the third time in the tournament’s existence, Ducks forward Patrick Eaves came away the winner:

Columnist warns Blackhawks fans: DeBrincat may not make the jump

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It’s easy to see why Chicago Blackhawks fans are excited about Alex DeBrincat.

The undersized forward already seemed like a potential steal when the Blackhawks drafted him in the second round (39th overall) back in 2016, as he was coming off consecutive 100-point seasons in the OHL. DeBrincat topped that in 2016-17, scoring more than a goal per game (65 in 63) and finishing with a ridiculous 127 points.

Honestly, that last paragraph might leave some Blackhawks fans twitching with excitement.

MORE: DeBrincat was the one to watch at prospects camp

CSN Chicago’s Tracey Myers relays an important message on Thursday, though: tap the brakes.

Beyond the questions of the 19-year-old being ready for the NHL, Myers reasonably wonders if Chicago can fit him into its salary structure.

Looking at the Blackhawks’ listing at Cap Friendly, it’s clear that Myers has a point. There are 14 forwards under contract, and as Myers notes, only Nick Schmaltz can be sent to the AHL without needing to clear waivers.

The Athletic’s Scott Powers notes that few 19-year-olds have made much of a dent on recent Blackhawks rosters beyond Patrick Kane, Jonathan Toews, and Nick Leddy. As great as Joel Quenneville can be at integrating younger players into Chicago’s mix, history states that DeBrincat indeed faces an uphill climb.

Then again, for a smaller forward whose numbers sometimes get disregarded or downplayed because of his stature, DeBrincat’s probably used to overcoming odds. If nothing else, the Blackhawks seem willing to go the extra mile if it gives them a better chance to compete.

Even so, Blackhawks fans would probably be wise not to pencil him into the 2017-18 lineup just yet.