Boston Bruins v Vancouver Canucks - Game Two

Think Tim Thomas will change his ways after Game 2? Think again

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After Boston’s tough Game 2 loss in overtime to Vancouver that saw Alex Burrows score on a relatively easy wraparound goal, there were some fans and analysts who hoped they would see Tim Thomas not be quite so aggressive in challenging shooters. We mentioned in our Five Thoughts today that Thomas was doing just fine without the collective critiques from armchair coaches across North America and that letting him do his thing was the right way to go.

With today being a rest day for both teams, Thomas had a chance to talk to the media and the first question he heard at this afternoon’s press conference was asking him about his aggressive style. Thomas took the opportunity to set things straight in his own fun way.

Q. Tim, wanted to ask you about when you’re a goaltender that comes out of the net a lot, when you challenge the way you do, do you think your defensemen and teammates maybe have to defend a little bit differently expecting that? Is there any room or need for you to make adjustments with regard to that?

TIM THOMAS: No. I have a pretty good idea of how to play goalie. I’m not going to be taking suggestions or advice at this time (smiling). I’m just going to keep playing the way I have.

Playing the way Thomas has in the playoffs has served him pretty well to this point as he’s posted some outstanding numbers in goal. Thomas has posted a 2.27 goals against average and a .930 save percentage in the Bruins’ 20 games in the playoffs. While he’s down 2-0 in the Stanley Cup finals, asking him to change things up in his game now would be like asking the Bruins to put their third string goalie in, it just wouldn’t make sense.

Bruins coach Claude Julien backed his goaltender up when he spoke with the press today and he was a bit more pointed in his thoughts.

Q. When you have a goalie like Tim, there’s going to be instances where he’s aggressive and gets himself into a tough spot but make spectacular saves. Do you have to accept that in your goaltender and not expect to change him in any way? Do the players have to adjust around that?

COACH JULIEN: I think all year long we’ve played in front of Timmy Thomas. To me he’s a Vezina Trophy winner. We are here right now because of his contribution, which has been really good. For us to be sitting here having to answer those kind of questions is ridiculous to me.

He’s won a Vezina Trophy already, as I mentioned. He’s probably going to win one this year, in my mind anyway, for what he’s done.

The question is, is his way of playing is really looking for something to talk about. Yesterday he made some unbelievable saves to keep us in the game. So if we want to focus on that last goal, which I think a lot of other players could have done a better job, I think it’s focusing on the wrong thing.

You can’t say that Thomas doesn’t have the support of his head coach and Julien bristles at this talk appropriately so. Without Thomas the Bruins are already back at home and counting down the days to next season. Where Julien wants to see from the other players, namely his defense, is stronger play in front of his goaltender.

Guys like Zdeno Chara, Andrew Ference, and Johnny Boychuk have to play better in order for the Bruins to succeed. If they’re not in the right place on the ice, turning the puck over, or committing bad penalties the Bruins might be in better shape in the finals. While those guys aren’t the only problem Boston’s facing right now (they could get better play from their forwards too) they’re the most obvious one. They haven’t been terrible, but they’ve been just bad enough to hurt the Bruins.

If you want to keep pointing the finger at Thomas as the reason why they’ve been losing, it’s a free country and you can do that, but of the four goals he’s given up in the finals only one, Burrows’ first goal in Game 2, is the only really regrettable one and that came on the power play. There’s always more than one culprit to be found when a team loses and in this case the obvious one isn’t the guy who’s allowing the goals.

Report: Islanders cut first-rounder Barzal from camp

Mathew Barzal
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It seems Mathew Barzal has played in his last game in a New York Islanders’ uniform for a little while.

Barzal took part in the Islanders’ preseason finale against the Washington Capitals on Sunday, but after that contest the Islanders decided to return him to WHL Seattle, per Newsday’s Arthur Staple.

He was taken with the 16th overall pick in 2015 NHL Entry Draft. That selection was well-traveled as it originally belonged to the Pittsburgh Penguins, but was involved in the David Perron trade and then moved to the Islanders as part of Edmonton’s deal to get Griffin Reinhart.

Barzal is noteworthy for his skill and speed, but he may have slipped in the draft due to a knee injury he sustained during the 2014-15 campaign.

The Islanders also reassigned Kirill Petrov, Kevin Czuczman, Scott Mayfield, and Adam Pelech to the AHL’s Bridgeport Sound Tigers.

Torres offered in-person hearing, potentially setting up long suspension

Torres hit

What will Raffi Torres get this time?

The 33-year-old forward that has become known primarily for his controversial hits has once again put himself in the sights of the NHL’s Department of Players Safety. They confirmed that he was offered an in-person hearing following his hit on Jakub Silfverberg Saturday night. He declined the opportunity to meet with them face-to-face, but the offer itself is an important detail because it gives the league the option to suspend him for more than five games.

It certainly seems like the stage is set for a lengthy suspension. While Torres is not considered a repeat offender as his last suspension came more than 18 months ago, the NHL still retains the right to consider his history when deciding on this matter.

Among other incidents, he was once was banned from 25 games for his hit on Marian Hossa in 2012, although it was later reduced to 21 contests after an appeal. The NHL found that Torres was guilty of breaking three rules for that hit; namely interference, charging, and illegally hitting the head. The NHL is reviewing Torres’ latest incident for the same three violations.

You can see the hit below:

And here it is slowed down:

Torres got a match penalty and Silfverberg left the game. Fortunately, Ducks coach Bruce Boudreau said that Silfverberg could have returned, but was kept out for precautionary reasons.