Think Tim Thomas will change his ways after Game 2? Think again

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After Boston’s tough Game 2 loss in overtime to Vancouver that saw Alex Burrows score on a relatively easy wraparound goal, there were some fans and analysts who hoped they would see Tim Thomas not be quite so aggressive in challenging shooters. We mentioned in our Five Thoughts today that Thomas was doing just fine without the collective critiques from armchair coaches across North America and that letting him do his thing was the right way to go.

With today being a rest day for both teams, Thomas had a chance to talk to the media and the first question he heard at this afternoon’s press conference was asking him about his aggressive style. Thomas took the opportunity to set things straight in his own fun way.

Q. Tim, wanted to ask you about when you’re a goaltender that comes out of the net a lot, when you challenge the way you do, do you think your defensemen and teammates maybe have to defend a little bit differently expecting that? Is there any room or need for you to make adjustments with regard to that?

TIM THOMAS: No. I have a pretty good idea of how to play goalie. I’m not going to be taking suggestions or advice at this time (smiling). I’m just going to keep playing the way I have.

Playing the way Thomas has in the playoffs has served him pretty well to this point as he’s posted some outstanding numbers in goal. Thomas has posted a 2.27 goals against average and a .930 save percentage in the Bruins’ 20 games in the playoffs. While he’s down 2-0 in the Stanley Cup finals, asking him to change things up in his game now would be like asking the Bruins to put their third string goalie in, it just wouldn’t make sense.

Bruins coach Claude Julien backed his goaltender up when he spoke with the press today and he was a bit more pointed in his thoughts.

Q. When you have a goalie like Tim, there’s going to be instances where he’s aggressive and gets himself into a tough spot but make spectacular saves. Do you have to accept that in your goaltender and not expect to change him in any way? Do the players have to adjust around that?

COACH JULIEN: I think all year long we’ve played in front of Timmy Thomas. To me he’s a Vezina Trophy winner. We are here right now because of his contribution, which has been really good. For us to be sitting here having to answer those kind of questions is ridiculous to me.

He’s won a Vezina Trophy already, as I mentioned. He’s probably going to win one this year, in my mind anyway, for what he’s done.

The question is, is his way of playing is really looking for something to talk about. Yesterday he made some unbelievable saves to keep us in the game. So if we want to focus on that last goal, which I think a lot of other players could have done a better job, I think it’s focusing on the wrong thing.

You can’t say that Thomas doesn’t have the support of his head coach and Julien bristles at this talk appropriately so. Without Thomas the Bruins are already back at home and counting down the days to next season. Where Julien wants to see from the other players, namely his defense, is stronger play in front of his goaltender.

Guys like Zdeno Chara, Andrew Ference, and Johnny Boychuk have to play better in order for the Bruins to succeed. If they’re not in the right place on the ice, turning the puck over, or committing bad penalties the Bruins might be in better shape in the finals. While those guys aren’t the only problem Boston’s facing right now (they could get better play from their forwards too) they’re the most obvious one. They haven’t been terrible, but they’ve been just bad enough to hurt the Bruins.

If you want to keep pointing the finger at Thomas as the reason why they’ve been losing, it’s a free country and you can do that, but of the four goals he’s given up in the finals only one, Burrows’ first goal in Game 2, is the only really regrettable one and that came on the power play. There’s always more than one culprit to be found when a team loses and in this case the obvious one isn’t the guy who’s allowing the goals.

NHL suspends Desjardins two preseason games for illegal check to the head

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The NHL’s Department of Player Safety has issued another two-game preseason suspension, this time to Andrew Desjardins of the New York Rangers.

The incident occurred during the first period of Saturday’s game between the Rangers and New Jersey Devils, as Desjardins delivered a hit to the head of Miles Wood.

Desjardins received a match penalty for an illegal check to the head, and a two-game preseason ban on Monday.

“Desjardins, looking to prevent Wood from cutting to the front of the net, steps in front of Wood and delivers a high hit, which makes the head the main point of contact on a hit where such head contact was avoidable,” stated the Department of Player Safety in a video explanation.

“It is important to note that Wood is eligible to be hit on this play, provided it is done in a legal manner. However, rather than taking an angle of approach that results in a legal, full-bodied check, Desjardins takes an angle of approach that picks Wood’s head, making it the main point of contact.”

The Rangers are in action right now versus the Philadelphia Flyers. They have one game remaining on their preseason schedule after tonight, as they take on the Flyers again tomorrow.

Desjardins was attending Rangers camp on a professional tryout.

 

Devils score early and often, opening up seven-goal lead vs. Senators

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Tough night for the Ottawa Senators and, specifically, goaltender Mike Condon on Monday.

Playing the New Jersey Devils in the Kraft Hockeyville showcase in Summerside, Prince Edward Island, Condon allowed seven goals on 17 shots before the midway point of the second period.

Andrew Hammond then entered into the game for Ottawa, with the Senators down 7-0.

Marcus Johansson started the scoring onslaught for New Jersey. Nico Hischier gave the Devils a three-goal lead before the eight-minute mark of the opening period, and John Quenneville scored twice in less than 30 seconds to put New Jersey up by seven in the second period.

Golden Knights embed season ticket members’ names in T-Mobile Arena ice

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The Vegas Golden Knights have chosen an interesting way to honor their season ticket members, as the organization inches closer to starting its inaugural NHL regular season.

The Golden Knights will, for the first time, play on their home ice at T-Mobile Arena on Tuesday against the L.A. Kings in preseason action. To commemorate this historic season, the organization will embed the names of its season ticket members into the ice surface at their home arena.

(You can check out the video here. Very cool.)

“That it was feasible, if we wanted to do something special on the ice, that we had the ability to put texture to something on the ice, before the laid the last round of it,” said Todd Pollock, Golden Knights vice-president of ticketing and suites.

“It’s in the thousands, the number of names out there. Many thousands.”

The Golden Knights have played four preseason games so far — all on the road. They open the regular season with two games in two nights on the road, on Oct. 6 versus the Dallas Stars and the following night versus the Arizona Coyotes. They return to Vegas for their home opener against the Coyotes on Oct. 10.

NHL players weigh in on national anthem protests, divisive President Trump comments

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A number of National Hockey League players and coaches on Monday expressed their opinions about the national anthem protests and the divisive comments of President Donald Trump during a rally on Friday and on Twitter this weekend.

At a rally on Friday, Trump urged NFL team owners to fire players that take a knee during the National Anthem. He reiterated those remarks on Twitter the following day.

On Sunday, almost every NFL team took part in a form of protest against racial inequality and injustice during the anthem. Some players took a knee. Other players linked arms with fellow players, coaches and even team owners in a show of solidarity. Some teams, like the Pittsburgh Steelers, Seattle Seahawks and Tennessee Titans did not take the field during the anthem.

On Monday, Toronto Maple Leafs forward Auston Matthews, who is 20 years old and from Scottsdale, AZ., said he would not take part in protest during the anthem.

“My great uncle served, I have friends and family who’ve served, there’s men and women who have risked their lives for the United States, people who have died for the United States,” Matthews said, per Sportsnet.

“I don’t know if kneeling, sitting, stretching is something I’d really look into doing because to me it’s like a dishonour to the men and women that fight for that flag, fight for the U.S. I don’t think I’d be one of the people to take part in that.”

Boston Bruins forward David Backes, who is from Minneapolis, MN., said he will continue to stand during the Star Spangled Banner.

“My opinion is that I’m American and I love my country and I love my flag,” said Backes, per CSNNE.com.

“I’ve got great buddies that have been in the military and they’ve sacrificed for my freedom, so I’d never want to do anything to disrespect that. My standpoint is that I’m standing for every national anthem with my hand over my heart and I’m staring at that flag recognizing those sacrifices. If I’ve got beef with a social justice issue or something else-wise, I’m going to find different avenues that are not disrespectful, especially to those that are military men and women that give me the freedom to do what I do.”

Carolina Hurricanes defenseman Justin Faulk told the Edmonton Journal that players have the right to protest, while his head coach Bill Peters does not believe that kneeling during the National Anthem is a sign of disrespect.

“I understand both sides. I don’t think anyone is truly trying to disrespect the flag, to be honest with you,” Peters told the Raleigh News & Observer. “I think people have too much pride in what’s going on in their countries, and they just want to make it better and there’s nothing wrong with that.”

Winnipeg Jets forward Blake Wheeler is believed to be the first NHL player to publicly speak out against the comments of President Trump, doing so from his verified Twitter account on Saturday. His comments followed scathing criticism of the President from a number of athletes, including NBA stars LeBron James and Stephen Curry, in the wake of what Trump said at the rally. Following Sunday’s schedule of games, a number of NFL players spoke about the protests.

“I’m absolutely for the first amendment,” said Wheeler, when asked if he would support a teammate if they decide to take a knee during the National Anthem.

“I’m a big believer that what makes America a special place is you’re allowed to stand up for what you believe in. With just cause, if someone were electing to do that they would 100 percent have my support. Even if I don’t necessarily agree with why they do it it is their right to feel that way, it is their right to behave that way. If I didn’t agree with it, I would absolutely sit down, have a coffee, talk about it, try to understand why they feel that way and maybe you become a little more sympathetic.”