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Comparing Vancouver noise levels in Stanley Cup finals to Chicago and Philadelphia in 2010


Last year, we followed the competing noise levels between Chicago Blackhawks and Philadelphia Flyers fans during the 2010 Stanley Cup finals. is keeping track of the ear-splitting volumes of the 2011 Stanley Cup finals as well, so we thought it would be interesting to follow those trends again.

Before we get into the Decibel Meter readings for Game 2 in Vancouver, provides some context about how these sound levels would affect your hearing (and comfort) during a game.

Level at which sustained exposure may result in hearing loss:      90 – 95dB
Pain begins:     
Loudest recommended exposure WITH hearing protection:      
Loudest sound possible:      

Looking at last year’s first four games, Chicago’s crowd hit 121dB and 122dB peaks in their first two home games while Philadelphia hit 114dB and 118dB in Games 3 and 4. While we couldn’t find readings from Game 1 in Vancouver, provides some of the highest levels of noise saturation in Game 2. Here are some of the most interesting readings.

Pre-game “Manny! (Malhotra) chant: 98dB – like a snowmobile
Malhotra’s first shift, appears on video screen: 108dB – Power saw
Burrows’ first goal: 111dB – Sandblasting
Daniel Sedin’s tying goal: 114dB – Loud rock concert
Burrows scores the OT winner: 117 dB – Loud rock concert
Fans chant “We Want the Cup” – Snowmobile

Obviously, it became very loud at points in Rogers Arena during Game 2, yet Chicago’s crowd hit higher peaks in both of their games and Philadelphia managed a higher peak in Game 4. That doesn’t mean that they were louder over the long haul, but it might give some credibility to Philly and Chicago as strong hockey markets if they can hang with a Canadian one.

The Canucks crowd’s loudest times provided a stark contrast to some long stretches when it seemed like you could hear a pin drop in Game 2 in Vancouver (or so it seemed on TV, at least). The Vancouver audience seemed substantially subdued when Boston was holding onto a 2-1 lead in the third period, prompting many (myself included) to wonder why they were so rattled when the Canucks were only trailing by a single goal. Obviously, that solemn atmosphere didn’t last forever, especially once Daniel Sedin notched things up by scoring on a yawning net.

It’s quite possible that Vancouver fans were simply terrified that the team might let its best chance to win a first-ever Stanley Cup slip away. That’s an understandable fear and they certainly showed great passion when the Canucks got back into the game (and also showed fantastic spirit when Malhotra completed his courageous comeback).

Please keep in mind that there probably aren’t big differences in these results; ultimately these fan bases are making a ton of noise. That being said, it’s fun to back up (or refute) assumptions about loud crowds with hard numbers. We’ll let you know how the crowds in Boston perform as the Bruins try to fight their way back into this series and we’ll also keep an eye on Vancouver’s crowds if the series stretches to five games or more.

Video: Wild score four in 5:07 for shock win in Colorado

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Everything was going great for the Avs in their season-opener against Minnesota on Thursday night.

Great until the third period, anyway.

In a stunning and dramatic comeback, the Wild erased a 4-1 deficit in just over five minutes — 5:07 to be exact — scoring four times to steal a 5-4 win at the Pepsi Center.

The comeback started early in the final frame, when Wild captain Zach Parise scored his second of the night at the 5:07 mark. Just over two minutes later, Nino Niederreiter snapped one past Semyon Varlamov to make it 4-3 and then, two minutes after that, Thomas Vanek scored to make it 4-4.

But the Wild weren’t done there.

Parise completed his hat-trick — the third of his career — with a power play marker at the 10:14 mark, an unassisted tally. When the dust finally settled on the 5:07 flurry, the Wild had combined to rack up nine points from eight different skaters.

Prior to the comeback, Colorado dominated proceedings with a goalscoring flurry of its own.

The Avs scored three times in the final seven minutes of the first period — including a pair of power play goals from Jarome Iginla and Erik Johnson — to race out to a (seemingly) commanding 3-0 lead.

Video: Flyers, Bolts confirm 3-on-3 OT is pretty much the greatest thing ever


Well, the NHL’s two new initiatives for ’15-16 seem to be going swimmingly.

Not long after Ottawa successfully made the second-ever coach’s challenge, fans got their first look at 3-on-3 overtime.

And what a look it was.

In the span of 137 seconds, the Tampa Bay Lightning and Philadelphia Flyers combined for eight shots on goal, a few breakaways, some tremendous saves — including one on a penalty shot — and, finally, Jason Garrison‘s game-winning goal on a breakaway from center, giving the Bolts a 3-2 win.

It was, in a word, fun.

Lots of fun.

A quick sampling of reviews:

Of course, not everybody was a fan:

Now, to temper things a bit — this was the first time we’ve seen 3-on-3 with something on the line, so there was a novelty factor at play. There’s also no guaranteeing future OT sessions will be as exciting as this.

But none of that takes away from the fact 3-on-3 made for appointment viewing, and immense entertainment value. The prospect of future games like this? That’s pretty exciting.