Dan Hamhuis, Zdeno Chara, Roberto Luongo

Bruins attack plan for Game 2: Stress out Roberto Luongo

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One of the keys to success for the Bruins to try and beat the Canucks in the Stanley Cup finals is figuring out a way to beat Roberto Luongo. After Luongo’s 36-save shutout in Game 1 that saw a lot of his saves come on shots from a good distance away from the net, that’s not a good way for the Bruins to get Luongo out of his comfort zone.

While the Bruins again had their own sorts of issues on the power play, the main way they’re going to get success is to get Luongo feeling stressed out in goal. By increasing their presence around the net and making him work even harder than he already is, they can wear him down to the point that he can slip up in his form in goal and increase the Bruins chances of scoring.

Saying that and doing that are two entirely different things, however, and the Bruins know it. As for how they’ll try and go about things in Game 2 on Saturday night (8 p.m. ET on NBC), veteran Bruins forward Mark Recchi tells Joe Haggerty of CSN New England that they’ve got some ideas.

“You always think you can be harder on a team. You’ve got to make it tougher on every goalie . . . whether you think you played a perfect game or not,” said Mark Recchi, who is chief among the players expected to start fighting with more ferocity in front of the blue paint. “He’s a great goalie and you’ve got to make him work.”

Recchi continued: “Obviously you always need to have traffic. They’re going to try to get in front of Timmy, and that’s what all of our jobs are as players is to get in front there to try and make it as hard as you can.”

Big guys like Milan Lucic and Nathan Horton can get physical in front of the net on the Vancouver defensemen and make life trickier on Roberto Luongo,but  it’s up to them to stir things up. With Zdeno Chara planting himself in front of the net on the power play, they could use that to their advantage. They weren’t totally able to do that in Game 1 but they’ll have to do it in Game 2 to avoid heading home down 2-0 in the series.

The one thing potentially working against Boston with that strategy is how Luongo’s matured and improved his mental focus this season and especially in the playoffs. The last two years in the postseason Dustin Byfuglien ran roughshod over the Vancouver defense in front of the net and made Luongo’s life a living hell. While Chicago caused him problems again in this year’s playoffs, guys milling around his net haven’t been the problem it has been in the past for Luongo. Instead, he’s let it roll off his back and he’s kept his cool.

It’s that brand of Zen focus the Bruins will need to break. Doing that while not running afoul of the law and drawing penalties makes for a tricky endeavor. If the Bruins can find a way, however, they might find the breaks they’re looking for to help even up the series.

Make that four straight wins for the Bruins

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Brent Burns turned in a dominating performance. But Brad Marchand had the last laugh.

Marchand scored his 25th goal of the season and, more importantly, the overtime winner for the Boston Bruins as they defeated the San Jose Sharks 2-1 on Sunday.

That’s Boston’s fourth consecutive win since the controversial coaching change — which took another twist earlier in the week when the rival Montreal Canadiens fired Michel Therrien and hired Claude Julien. Off a defensive zone faceoff, Marchand bolted up the ice for the breakaway pass, on what appeared to be a set play, beating Martin Jones through the legs.

The Bruins move back into third in the Atlantic Division, and are now only four points back of the faltering Habs for first.

Meanwhile, the Sharks were unable to fully capitalize on another freakish Brent Burns outing. He’s been dubbed ‘an unstoppable force’ in recent posts at PHT — a defenseman possessing great size at six-foot-five-inches tall and 230 pounds, but no shortage of mobility and offensive talent with 27 goals and 64 points in 60 games. Um, and did we mention he’s a defenseman. . . ?

Against the Bruins, he had 20 shot attempts — by far the most of any player in this game — in just over 26 minutes of ice time.

Given the final score, that probably doesn’t mean much to Brad Marchand.

Jacob Trouba will have a hearing for head shot on Mark Stone

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It appears Jacob Trouba will face supplemental discipline from the NHL.

The league’s Department of Player Safety has said in a Twitter statement that Trouba, the Winnipeg Jets defenseman, will have a hearing tomorrow for his head shot on Ottawa Senators forward Mark Stone during Sunday’s game.

Trouba was assessed only a minor penalty on the play. Stone, who dealt with a concussion prior to the beginning of the season, stayed down on the ice before he eventually made his way to the dressing room.

The incident occurred when Trouba stepped up to throw a hit on Stone, but instead caught him in the head as he followed through, sending Stone to the ice.

Stone was one of three Ottawa forwards to leave the game because of injuries, which are piling up for the Senators.

Video: Drouin ‘wasn’t going to be denied’ on thrilling OT winner

TAMPA, FL - APRIL 30:  Jonathan Drouin #27 of the Tampa Bay Lightning celebrates his goal against the New York Islanders  during the first period in Game Two of the Eastern Conference Second Round during the 2016 NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs at Amalie Arena on April 30, 2016 in Tampa, Florida. (Photo by Scott Iskowitz/Getty Images)
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The Tampa Bay Lightning needed overtime to defeat the Colorado Avalanche on Sunday, but it’s a critical win for the Bolts as they try to chase down a playoff spot.

The hero? Jonathan Drouin, and he did so with a thrilling individual effort — making moves, then losing the puck and then immediately getting it back before he finally scored on the backhander.

That’s his 17th goal of the season. Tampa Bay gets a 3-2 win, which keeps them five points back of Toronto for the final wild card spot in the East.

‘It looks like a disaster’ — Senators could be facing more injury problems

BOSTON, MA - MAY 27:  Head coach Guy Boucher of the Tampa Bay Lightning speaks to the media after their 0 to 1 loss to the Boston Bruins in Game Seven of the Eastern Conference Finals during the 2011 NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs at TD Garden on May 27, 2011 in Boston, Massachusetts.  (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
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Not only did the Ottawa Senators lose on Sunday, but three different forwards left the game because of injury.

And that was after they had already lost forward Bobby Ryan indefinitely because of a hand injury. In a 3-2 loss to the Winnipeg Jets, the Senators had Mike Hoffman, Mark Stone and Tommy Wingels leave with injuries.

Hoffman suffered a lower-body injury in the first period, while Stone was caught with a hit to the head from defenseman Jacob Trouba. That infraction might result in Trouba getting further supplementary discipline from the NHL.

“Tough day with the loss of Bobby and then we lost another bunch of guys. At some point I felt, there was nobody on the bench,” said Senators coach Guy Boucher, who appeared furious with the officials’ decision to give Trouba only a minor penalty for an illegal check to the head.

“I can give you an update – it doesn’t look good. We have to wait until tomorrow to be clear and precise about all these guys.

“Right now, we could be losing quite a few guys … It looks like a disaster. We’ll see tomorrow and maybe the disaster is not as bad as we think but you’ve got to be ready for anything.”

What especially hurts for the Senators is that Hoffman, Stone and Ryan are three very capable offensive players, and if all three are out long-term, that’s a good chunk of scoring suddenly gone from their lineup. Stone leads the team with 22 goals, while Hoffman is tied for second in that category with Kyle Turris at 19 goals.

The Senators had a chance to take over top spot in the Atlantic Division. With a win, Ottawa would’ve tied Montreal with 70 points, but taken first in the division because of fewer games played.