Boston Bruins v Vancouver Canucks - Game One

Five Thoughts on Vancouver’s Game 1 victory over Boston

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It might not have been the most perpetually exciting Game 1 in Stanley Cup finals history, but it did result in an exciting conclusion with the Vancouver Canucks beating the Boston Bruins 1-0 thanks to a Raffi Torres goal with 18.5 seconds left in the third to take a 1-0 lead in the series. As you might expect, we’ve got a few thoughts on the game.

1. After such a tense Game 1 that saw both teams getting tremendous chances coupled with a meticulous and overly careful pace at times, it all came down to one mistake by Boston and one tremendous play by Ryan Kesler to swing the game. It starts with a missed play by Johnny Boychuk, a tremendous play by Kesler to make sure the play stays onside and then a pair of great passes. Kesler’s pass to Jannik Hansen and then Hansen’s hesitation pass to Raffi Torres to make sure they got Tim Thomas out of position to score the game’s lone goal. Much like Boston’s Game 7 win against Tampa Bay, the game came down to one defensive breakdown, this time it was Boston making the mistake. Of course, hockey can be a fickle game and this one was more about the goaltending than not.

2. Give it up to Roberto Luongo for earning his third shutout of the playoffs. For the third time, he also pitched a shutout in Game 1 of a series. He did it against both Chicago and Nashville as well and last night he more than earned it stopping 36 shots and dealt with having to stare at Zdeno Chara’s behind while the Bruins were on the power play. Luongo has been sharp ever since they’ve beaten Chicago in the first round and his play tonight is further proof that the Luongo we’re watching now is a much more mature and smarter goalie than we’ve seen in the past. Growing up is interesting that way.

3. As for Chara parking in front of the net on the power play, it didn’t do too much for the Bruins success there as they went 0-6 with the man advantage including coming up empty on a 4:00 double minor and a 1:35 5-on-3 power play. While Chara’s presence in front of the net is intimidating and causes vision issues for Luongo, his skills there are in need of sharpening. He’s not exactly Tomas Holmstrom or Dustin Byfuglien in front of the net. In fact, Luongo’s experience in dealing with Byfuglien the last two years is serving him better in how to deal with Chara.

Considering that Boston at one point was putting three defensemen out on the power play with Chara in front and Tomas Kaberle and Dennis Seidenberg on the point, it’s no wonder why the Bruins power play struggled again in Game 1. The Bruins are trying whatever they can to make it work with the power play but they’re still coming up empty. Old problems coming home to roost in the Stanley Cup finals won’t go over well with the fans.

4. One other thing that will go under the microscope for Boston is Claude Julien’s decision to split up Dennis Seidenberg and Zdeno Chara. The Bruins were 12-4 with those two teamed up together in the playoffs and the decision to split them up put things a bit out of whack in Game 1. Chara was solid but the Canucks speed started to wear him down. It also caused Seidenberg to take a penalty in the second period and made life miserable on Johnny Boychuk in the third period.

As CSN New England’s Joe Haggerty pointed out to me after the game, Boychuk’s got problems of his own lately as he’s been on the ice for the last seven goals against the Bruins. That’s a major problem considering Tomas Kaberle’s minutes have been up and down and Adam McQuaid is still a bit green. Andrew Ference can be solid at times but isn’t wholly reliable. It’ll be interesting to see if Julien goes back to having one dominant defensive unit or tries to make things work with Chara and Seidenberg split up again.

5. As for Alex Burrows’ chomp on the finger of Patrice Bergeron, it’s an unbelievably dumb move by Burrows. With Burrows situated on the top line with the Sedin twins he can’t be committing stupid mental mistakes like that that distract from what his team is doing on the ice and put him in the box. While the Bruins didn’t score on the power play they gained from that, the likelihood of Burrows being suspended for Game 2 for doing that is high. Burrows played coy in his quotes after the game and Bruins coach Claude Julien called it “classless”  but you flat out don’t do that. Jarkko Ruutu was suspended for two games for doing that to Andrew Peters years ago and while the playoffs skew how punishment is likely meted out, our guess is that you can bank on Burrows missing Game 2.

With that likely happening, that means Burrows will be replaced on the top line by any one of Chris Higgins, Mason Raymond, Jeff Tambellini or another forward. That means the Sedins have to run with a new linemate for a game in a situation that demands solid play and perfection to earn a win. Stupidity should be painful and the Canucks might just get to learn a hard lesson thanks to a key player being a selfish buffoon.

Sens to move AHL affiliate from Binghamton to Belleville

MANCHESTER, NH - FEBRUARY 13:  Center Jason Spezza of the Binghamton Senators smiles before the start of the American Hockey League All Star Skills Competition on February 13, 2005 at Verizon Wireless Arena in Manchester, New Hampshire.  (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
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The Ottawa Senators announced today that they’ve purchased the AHL franchise in Binghamton, N.Y. and will move it to Belleville, Ont. for the start of the 2017-18 season.

From the press release:

The Ottawa Senators and the City of Belleville have also agreed on an eight-year agreement to welcome the newly minted Belleville Senators to the city.

In order to properly accommodate a new professional AHL team, the City of Belleville will immediately undertake more than $18.5 million in important renovations to modernize Belleville’s Yardmen Arena and prepare it for professional hockey for the first time in the city’s history. 

The Baby Sens have played in Binghamton since 2002, winning a Calder Cup in 2011. AHL officials are reportedly working to secure another franchise for the city for the 2017-18 season.

Belleville to Ottawa is a mere 2.5-hour drive, according to Google. The Belleville Bulls were an OHL team that started playing in 1981 before moving to Hamilton in 2015.

Seidenberg, without a contract, playing a key role for Team Europe

BOSTON, MA - JUNE 08:  Dennis Seidenberg #44 of the Boston Bruins skates against Mason Raymond #21 of the Vancouver Canucks during Game Four of the 2011 NHL Stanley Cup Final at TD Garden on June 8, 2011 in Boston, Massachusetts.  (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
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Dennis Seidenberg has been a key player for Team Europe at the World Cup, and he doesn’t even have an NHL contract.

Seidenberg, 35, logged 23:30 in Europe’s 3-2 overtime upset of Sweden on Sunday. Only Roman Josi (29:00) played more for the winning side. Seidenberg even played more than his old Boston teammate, Zdeno Chara (22:26).

“I’ve played quite a bit,” Seidenberg said earlier in the tournament, per the Associated Press. “People should know what I can do and can’t do by now, but nonetheless this is an important tournament for me.”

A Stanley Cup champion in 2011, Seidenberg became an unrestricted free agent when he was bought out by the Bruins over the summer. At first, the decision shocked him, but the shock eventually passed. So far, he’s been holding out for a guaranteed contract, as opposed to a tryout.

The Ottawa Senators are reportedly a potential landing spot.

Seidenberg may not be a full-time, top-four defenseman anymore, but he should still be able to hold down a bottom-pairing role, with the ability to log top-four minutes if there’s an injury.

He’ll get another good look from the scouts on Tuesday when Team Europe opens its best-of-three series with the heavy favorites from Canada. He’s not the only UFA blue-liner on his team, as 34-year-old Christian Ehrhoff is also playing a role, albeit a smaller one.

Cashing in: Marchand inks eight-year, $49M extension in Boston

Brad Marchand
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This summer, we wondered what Brad Marchand’s next contract might look like.

Now we know.

Per Sportsnet, the Bruins have inked the talented, agitating winger to a hefty eight-year, $49 million contract extension — one that carries an average annual cap hit of $6.125 million per season.

This news comes with Marchand heading into the final year of his current deal, a four-year, $18 million pact with a $4.5M AAV — so it’s a pretty nice pay bump.

This extension will also make Marchand the club’s third highest-paid forward, behind David Krejci and Patrice Bergeron, and will keep him in the black and gold through 2025.

Earlier reports suggested Marchand’s initial ask was for $49 million over seven years.

That the B’s were willing to tack on an extra year of term wasn’t surprising, especially in light of what GM Don Sweeney told WEEI earlier this summer.

“I’ve identified March as a core guy, and we want to continue down that path,” Sweeney said. “It always takes two sides to make a deal, and I would envision that he’d like to be part of this organization for what could be arguably his whole career.”

Coming off a year in which he finished sixth in the NHL in goals, with 37, Marchand has only upped his value in recent weeks with a terrific effort for Team Canada at the World Cup.

The 28-year-old has starred on a line alongside Bergeron and Sidney Crosby, sitting second on the team in scoring with three goals and five points through four games. He also sits second on the team in shots on goal, with 17.

Though his reputation is somewhat checkered and his disciplinary rap sheet is a mile long, Marchand has done plenty in trying to shed that label. He’s morphed into one of the better snipers in the league, and his presence on the Canadian national team will only further help erase perceptions he’s primarily an agitator.

This contract will help, too.

After failing physical, Grabovski placed on IR

New York Islanders v Philadelphia Flyers
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Mikhail Grabovski won’t be suiting up for the Islanders anytime soon.

Grabovski, absent from Isles camp after failing to pass his physical, has been placed on IR with an upper-body injury, a byproduct of concussion symptoms he’s suffered since last season.

The 32-year-old hasn’t suited up since Mar. 15, when he returned from a 10-game absence to play 17 minutes in a shootout loss to Pittsburgh.

At the time, the Isles were happy to have Grabovski back in the lineup, but the feeling was fleeting. Immediately after the Pittsburgh game, the club sent Grabovski back to New York for medical evaluation.

He didn’t play another game that year, or in the club’s playoff run.

In the midst of a four-year, $20 million deal — set to expire in 2018 — it’s possible Grabovski will be placed on LTIR, in order to give the club financial relief from his $5 million cap hit.

The Isles are pretty tight to the cap ceiling with Grabovski on the books, approximately $2.5M under (per General Fanager).