Canucks outlasted the Bruins in third period, but how much did Game 1 really tell us?

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Many hockey players discuss the notion that momentum matters within the span of a single game, but might not transfer to future contests. By that logic, it seems like it might be dangerous to assume that results will repeat throughout any series. Yet Game 1 of the 2011 Stanley Cup finals seemed like even less of a sign of the times than we’re accustomed to.

In some ways, it almost felt like the penalty parade that took place in the first and second periods made the first 40 minutes unintelligible. Ultimately, we couldn’t take much from those opening frames other than brilliant goaltending by Tim Thomas and Roberto Luongo, Alex Burrows biting Patrice Bergeron’s hand and Dan Hamhuis seemingly hurting himself with his own hip check on Milan Lucic.

As time goes on, that Raffi Torres game-winning goal will define Game 1 on highlight reels. Ryan Kesler started things by forcing a Johnny Boychuk turnover in Boston’s zone. Kesler sent a great pass to Jannik Hansen (who had a great overall game) around the point area. Hansen then foiled both Zdeno Chara and an overly aggressive Thomas with his slick pass to Torres, who tapped the puck in with less than 19 seconds left in the game.

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Vancouver 1, Boston 0; Canucks lead series 1-0

After 13 penalties and 28 penalty minutes combined between both teams in the first two periods, the referees didn’t call a single penalty in the third period. The Canucks carried most of the play in those 20 minutes of uninterrupted 5-on-5 hockey. Vancouver out-shot Boston 14-10 in the third, but that shot differential still didn’t properly portray the Canucks’ advantages in puck control and scoring chances during that final frame.

It was a sloppy, rough and contentious Game 1. Deep down, it’s a bit drastic to draw too many conclusions from this contest since penalties really ruined much of the rhythm, but here are a few points to consider anyway.

Outlook for both teams

Some speculated that the Bruins were tired in the last 20 or just plain slow, but they shouldn’t be too discouraged by losing Game 1. Sure, it must be heartbreaking to lose with less than a minute left, but Thomas was brilliant and they proved they wouldn’t be pushovers in either zone.

Both teams should feel proud of their penalty kills and irritated by missed opportunities on the power plays, going 0-for-6 each. The Bruins might have received the greatest chances, receiving a lengthy 5-on-3 opportunity early in the second period after getting a four-minute double minor PP early in the first. The silver lining is that Boston produced a lot of shots during those two big opportunities in particular, firing nine shots on Luongo during the double-minor and three more on the 5-on-3.

The two other pluses were the play of Thomas and Zdeno Chara, who seemed to do a little bit of everything for the Bruins but couldn’t seal the deal.

The Canucks should feel great about this win, particularly their play in the third period, the fact that they matched Boston’s physicality and Roberto Luongo earned a 36-save shutout. The Sedin twins created some nice chances but couldn’t convert while Kesler was held in check for much of the game until his late-game assist washed all of that away. Vancouver forced Thomas to make some huge saves before they finally broke through, with perhaps his most exhilarating stop coming on a partial breakaway opportunity for Victor Oreskovich.

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One obvious area of concern for Vancouver is the health of Dan Hamhuis, who was banged up after delivering a hip check on Milan Lucic. Canucks coach Alain Vigneault said that Hamhuis is day-to-day after the hit and wouldn’t even reveal if it is an upper-body or lower-body injury. It’s unclear whether he’ll play in Game 2 or not, but an extra night of rest my improve his chances of playing on Saturday.

Overall, the Canucks shouldn’t be too high after narrowly winning Game 1 while the Bruins should stay positive since they were able to hang in there. Stick with PHT for updates, previews and analysis as the 2011 Stanley Cup finals continue.

Kelly or Wingels will replace White for Senators in Game 7

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Either Chris Kelly or Tommy Wingels will replace Colin White for the Ottawa Senators tonight.

White, 20, made his NHL playoff debut in Game 6, but he only took seven shifts and logged 2:39 of ice time.

Clearly, head coach Guy Boucher didn’t trust the rookie in such a big game.

Tonight in Pittsburgh, it’s an even bigger game. Win and it’s off to the Stanley Cup Final. Lose and that’s it for the season.

Kelly, 36, and Wingels, 29, have each played their share of big games. Kelly went to a Cup final with the Sens in 2007, and he went to a couple more with the Bruins. Wingels played for the Cup last year with the Sharks.

“They both have lived seven games, and they both have won seven games,” said Boucher. “So those are the two guys we need to have out there.”

Kelly has only played once this postseason, all the way back in the first round against Boston. But with Derick Brassard seemingly unable to take faceoffs, Kelly may draw in because he’s a center.

“It will all depend if it’s a center or winger I’m going to need,” said Boucher.

Related: Schultz and Hornqvist will be game-time decisions; Sheary may play

Carolina has the ‘open for business sign out there’

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Ron Francis is ready to make more deals.

Heading into the offseason, Francis had 11 draft picks at this June’s draft, and already used one — a third-rounder — to acquire Scott Darling from Chicago.

Now, the Hurricanes GM is prepared to use more in the hopes of adding to the roster.

“We’ve got the open for business sign out there,” Francis said Wednesday, per the News & Observer. “We’re in a unique situation with the amount of picks we have and the amount of prospects we have. It’ll be interesting.

“Really what it comes down to is what teams want: Do they want a player back for the asset they don’t have to protect or are they willing to take some picks and prospects?”

It’s pretty obvious the goal for Francis and head coach Bill Peters is to get the ‘Canes back into the playoffs for the first time since 2009. The team has shown steady improvement over the last three years — going from 30 to 35 to 36 wins — and had a nice late push before ultimately falling short this season.

“I think we have specific needs, very specific needs,” Peters said at Carolina’s end-of-year media availability. “So as a coach I’m going to give very specific names.”

It sounds like more than just picks could be in play.

The News & Observer said the ‘Canes “aren’t agonizing” over the expansion draft, as the team has a pretty good idea of who’ll be exposed. So it could be a case of identifying the players that will remain, and seeing what assets they may fetch in return.

There’s been speculation that the Hurricanes might be willing to move Noah Hanifin. Though it might seem strange to dangle a gifted 20-year-old d-man with loads of potential, Carolina has good depth on the blueline with Justin Faulk, Jaccob Slavin and Brett Pesce. It’s expected that prospects Roland McKeown and Haydn Fleury will push for NHL jobs next year, and there’s still ’16 first-rounder Jake Bean on the horizon.

Francis also has another asset at his disposal — cap space.

It’s what allowed the ‘Canes to snag Teuvo Teravainen from Chicago for the price of taking on Bryan Bickell‘s contract. Another similar move could very well be in the cards, especially when the NHL releases next year’s cap ceiling figure.

Report: ‘All signs point’ to contract extension for Ducks’ Fowler

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“All signs point toward” a contract extension for Anaheim Ducks defenseman Cam Fowler, according to TSN’s Pierre LeBrun.

LeBrun reported this morning that talks between the Ducks and the 25-year-old defenseman are expected to resume next week. Talks so far have been “positive,” said LeBrun.

It won’t be cheap to re-sign Fowler, who can become an unrestricted free agent next summer. He’s coming off a 39-point season for the Ducks, and he logged almost 25 minutes per game.

If Fowler does agree to re-sign, he’ll obviously be protected in the expansion draft, along with Hampus Lindholm. Assuming the Ducks only protect three defensemen, that would only leave one spot to protect Sami Vatanen, Josh Manson, or Kevin Bieksa — and the latter has a no-movement clause, which for now demands he be protected.

For that reason, Bieksa will likely be asked to waive his NMC. It’s also possible he could be bought out.

Anaheim does have the option to protect four defensemen and four forwards. However, Ryan Getzlaf, Corey Perry, and Ryan Kesler all have NMCs, and the Ducks won’t want to expose Rickard Rakell or Jakob Silfverberg.

Related: Big decisions looming for Ducks

Schultz and Hornqvist will be game-time decisions; Sheary may play

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Justin Schultz and Patric Hornqvist will be game-time decisions for the Pittsburgh Penguins tonight at PPG Paints Arena.

That was the word this morning from head coach Mike Sullivan, who said yesterday that it would be “reasonable” to expect the two players to return for Game 7 against the Ottawa Senators.

But the signs from this morning’s optional skate were not particularly promising for either player.

Schultz did not opt to skate, which does not necessarily rule him out for tonight. That said, players returning from injury often choose to test things out the morning of the game, just to be sure they’re ready to go.

Hornqvist did skate; however, he stayed on the ice rather late, likewise putting his status for tonight into doubt.

In other news, Conor Sheary may return to the lineup. Sheary skated this morning and left the ice with the players who are playing, while Josh Archibald skated and stayed on later. That suggests Sheary, a scratch in Games 5 and 6, could replace Archibald.