Nathan Horton, Milan Lucic

Bruins continue to reap rewards of Cam Neely trade with Canucks 25 years later

We’ve already discussed the fact that the Boston Bruins own a substantial all-time edge over the Vancouver Canucks on the ice. That historical domination extends beyond win-loss records, though, as the Bruins front office scored an enormous victory over Canucks management in the Cam Neely trade.

Even after 25 years, the Bruins franchise continues to benefit from the aftershocks of that earth-shaking trade. It is also safe to assume that many Canucks fans look at the day the move was made (June 6, 1986) as one of the darkest days in the franchise’s history and surely one of the NHL’s most lopsided deals.

Let’s take a look at the initial terms of the trade first.

Vancouver received: Barry Pederson

Pederson began his career on fire. He produced 92 points in his first full season (1981-82), 107 in 82-83 and 116 in 83-84. His final two seasons with Boston raised some red flags, though; he only played in 22 games in 84-85 but bounced back a bit in 85-86 with 76 points in 79 games. He played some solid hockey for Vancouver in his first two seasons (76 points in 86-87, 71 in 87-88) but injuries wrecked the rest of his career. He ended up scoring 197 points in 233 games for the Canucks, getting traded to Pittsburgh on January 8, 1990.

Boston received: Cam Neely and the Canucks’ first round pick in 1995 (Glen Wesley)

To be fair to Vancouver, there’s at least a slight chance Neely might not have flourished as a Canucks forward. He never scored more than 39 points or 21 goals in his first three seasons in Vancouver. Of course, he turned 21 on the day of that trade, so the Canucks management might have been a teeny bit hasty with that move. You’d think that Vancouver would have been more patient with the ninth overall pick of the ’83 draft, but let’s not pile on too much. (OK, the rest of this post probably qualifies as piling on, but still …)

Neely emerged almost immediately upon arriving in Boston, scoring 36 goals and 72 points in his first season with the Bruins. As you probably know, he went on to become a Hall of Famer despite having his career cut short by injuries.

Neely’s career was prolific enough to make Canucks fans wistful, but Glen Wesley’s years with Boston – and the assets the Bruins received from trading him – make the deal even more lopsided. Wesley spent seven seasons in Boston, making one All-Star team in the 88-89 season.

Now, it’s not really fair to beat up on Vancouver for trades they weren’t actually involved in, but the branching paths of trades that were made possible by acquiring Wesley are still making an impact today. Using a fantastic timeline by “The Hipster Jew” as inspiration, let’s take a look at the Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon-like path of the trade.

  • Boston trades Wesley to the Hartford Whalers in 1994 for three first round picks: 1995 (Kyle McLaren), 1996 (Johnathan Aitken) and 1997 (Sergei Samsonov).
  • They then traded McLaren with their 2004 fourth rounder (Torrey Mitchell) to the San Jose Sharks in 2003 for Jeff Hackett and Jeff Jillson.
  • Samsonov qualified as Joe Thornton’s first great running mate/beneficiary, but they eventually traded him to the Edmonton Oilers for Marty Reasoner, Yan Stastny and the Oilers’ second round pick in ’06, which ended up being … Milan Lucic. (Yup, that’s right, the Bruins found their closest heir to Neely thanks to the Neely trade. Yikes.)
  • The Bruins turned Jeff Jillson into Brad Boyes (from San Jose in ’04) and then Boyes to Dennis Wideman (from the St. Louis Blues in ’07) .
  • Wideman was eventually traded with Boston’s 2010 first round pick (Derek Fortbort) to the Florida Panthers for Nathan Horton and Gregory Campbell before the ’10 draft.

***

So, in the most direct way, the Bruins won that trade thanks to Neely’s great career and seven quality seasons of Wesley. That being said, the additional assets the B’s acquired add insult to injury, even if other NHL teams were involved. The Bruins acquired 2/3 of their top scoring line (Horton and Lucic) indirectly thanks to the Neely trade, so you cannot blame Canucks fans if they think to that pivotal moment in ’86 whenever Boston’s best trio comes through.

Rangers mostly dodge a bullet: Nash only expected to miss a week

NEW YORK, NY - DECEMBER 06: Rick Nash #61 of the New York Rangers moves the puck along the boards during the second period against the New York Islanders at the Barclays Center on December 6, 2016 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City.  (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)
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No one wants to hear “It could be worse” when injuries are really piling up, but … uh, it could be worse for the New York Rangers.

At least, it could have been worse for Rick Nash. The team announced that he’s only expected to miss about a week after undergoing an MRI related to a groin injury.

It’s been a redemptive season for Nash, so it’s nice to see that it isn’t getting totally derailed. Granted, injuries like these can linger even if a guy returns to the lineup, so we’ll need to see if he gets back to 100 percent.

The Rangers certainly aren’t at full-strength right now. Their laundry list of injured forwards is quite daunting, even for a team with vaunted depth at that position:

(It sounds like Pavel Buchnevich is still quite a ways from returning, sadly.)

Alain Vigneault sells the biggest benefit of these issues: opportunities for other players – including Oscar Lindberg – to step up.

“I just think this is part of the NHL and it is what it is. It’s there and you deal with it,” Vigneault said . “You get a lot of players at different times that wish that they can get more ice time to prove that they can have a bigger role and that they can do more. Well, no better time than the present for us right now.”

Double whammy to Habs centers: Galchenyuk, Desharnais out 6-8 weeks

MONTREAL, QC - NOVEMBER 08:  Alex Galchenyuk #27 of the Montreal Canadiens looks on during the warmup prior to the NHL game against the Boston Bruins at the Bell Centre on November 8, 2016 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.  The Montreal Canadiens defeated the Boston Bruins 3-2.  (Photo by Minas Panagiotakis/Getty Images)
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Thanks to two knee injuries, the Montreal Canadiens suddenly seem pretty slim at center.

The team announced two unfortunate and strangely similar timelines for important centers: both Alex Galchenyuk and David Desharnais are expected to miss six-to-eight weeks with their knee issues.

It will be a challenge for Michel Therrien to make everything work, to the point where you wonder if maybe he’ll move a player from the wing to center (hey, Max Pacioretty DOES want an elevated role, if you believe the rumors about discontent).

Tomas Plekanec becomes that much more important to the Canadiens, and one might assume that Andrew Shaw may go back to the middle. LNH.com’s Arpon Basu listed some options, in case you’re more of a visual learner:

Yeah, not ideal.

The road ahead

It isn’t all bad news when you look at Montreal’s overall situation.

For one thing, they gave themselves a nice cushion, as they currently lead the Atlantic Division by five points. With four games in a row and six of seven at home, they may be able to manage these tough losses pretty well in the short-term.

The real challenges might come late in December and early in January. They play seven road games in a row – though with a break around New Year’s – and nine of 10 away from Montreal from Dec. 23 – Jan. 12.

While they’ve suffered some minor bumps in the road so far, this is their truest test of 2016-17. It should be interesting to see how they handle this.

Pre-game reading: On the Isles and John Tavares

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— Up top, that time John Scott was named MVP of the All-Star Game. The big man announced his retirement today.

— New York Post writer Brett Cyrgalis believes the Islanders must do a better job of surrounding John Tavares with talent. Otherwise, Tavares might decide to leave. The Isles are certainly going to be an interesting team to watch. There’s all sorts of speculation that the new ownership group wants to bolster the front office, with former Canucks executives Mike Gillis and Laurence Gilman hearing their names floated as potential hires. Tavares can become an unrestricted free agent in the summer of 2018, and just like Steven Stamkos not too long ago, other markets already have their eyes on him. (New York Post)

— Speaking of the Canucks, GM Jim Benning will not be approaching any of his players about waiving their no-trade clauses. That includes Alex Burrows, Jannik Hansen, and Alex Edler, three veterans who could theoretically be dealt to help a rebuild. “These are the guys we want to keep and build our young players around,” said Benning, who’s said similar things in the past. (The Province)

— Elliotte Friedman’s latest “30 Thoughts” includes a prediction that the NHL will be in Beijing for the 2022 Winter Olympics, but it remains to be seen about the 2018 Games in South Korea. “For the first time, I’m not so sure. The NHL does not like the IOC and the owners don’t like the toll this season’s compressed schedule is taking on the players.” Which begs a pretty good question — If the NHL skips out in 2018, will the IOC even allow NHLers back in 2022? (Sportsnet)

— ESPN columnist Scott Burnside thinks the NHL should take a pass on the 2018 Games. “When we talk about the Olympics in terms of growing the game, what game are we talking about growing? The NHL game and the Olympic one are sometimes mutually exclusive. Forget the time difference and the difficulties of scheduling Olympic games during North American prime time. The more important question — and ultimate incentive for owners — is: Did the Olympic games in Japan, Italy and Russia do anything to promote the NHL game globally? The answer is pretty simple: No.” (ESPN)

— Good news about Craig Cunningham, who’s been speaking with his Tucson Roadrunners teammates via FaceTime. “It was nice to see him smile. He was cracking jokes just as if he were here the next day. It was pretty funny. He said he wanted us to come pick him up and take him to the rink. He was joking around. Stuff like that.” (KVOA)

Enjoy the games!

Goal-starved ‘Canes need to get to the net

WINNIPEG, MANITOBA - OCTOBER 13: Toby Enstrom #39 and Connor Hellebuyck #37 of the Winnipeg Jets follow the puck as Jordan Staal #11 of the Carolina Hurricanes screens Hellebuyck during NHL action on October 22, 2016 at the MTS Centre in Winnipeg, Manitoba. (Photo by Jason Halstead /Getty Images)
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The statistics say the Carolina Hurricanes are one of the top puck-possession teams in hockey.

But unlike most teams who fare well in the Corsi and Fenwick departments, the ‘Canes still lose more games than they win.

In the past, much of the blame for their struggles has been piled on Cam Ward and Eddie Lack, the two goalies. But Ward has actually been much better this season. The veteran netminder has a .924 save percentage over his 19 starts. He just hasn’t received much in the way of goal support, which explains his modest 9-7-4 record.

In fact, in Ward’s last five starts, he’s allowed just eight goals combined. The ‘Canes only won one of those games, a 1-0 overtime triumph Sunday against Tampa Bay.

   Read more: The curious case of the Carolina Hurricanes

Carolina (10-10-5) starts a three-game California road trip tonight in Anaheim.

“Our focus is on scoring,” coach Bill Peters said, per NHL.com. “It’s the ability to get on the board. I’d love to get on the board early. … It’s about the urgency to score, what you have to do to score. I want to see more guys in the blue paint. I want to see guys making it harder on the goaltender. If we do that, we’ll be successful.”

It remains to be seen if they have the personnel to score more dirty goals. At the moment, they’re without Jordan Staal (concussion), and that’s a significant loss. Up front, the ‘Canes just aren’t a very heavy team. Their top point-producers are speedy and skilled — Jeff SkinnerVictor RaskSebastian Aho, and Teuvo Teravainen — but Staal is the biggest and most physical of the bunch.

“To generate more offense and score more goals, we’ve got to be able to work our way inside and make it tough on them,” said defenseman Justin Faulk.

However they do it, they need to find a way. Because the ‘Canes have been slipping in the standings. They’re now six points back of a wild-card spot, tied with the Islanders and Leafs for the fewest points in the Eastern Conference.

Via Stats.HockeyAnalysis.com, here are the 10 goalies who have received the least amount of goal support this season:

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