Henrik Sedin, Kevin Bieksa, Christian Ehrhoff, Alex Burrows, Daniel Sedin

Vancouver Canucks will face more off-season questions than Boston Bruins

The Vancouver Canucks haven’t been to the Stanley Cup finals since 1994 while the Boston Bruins didn’t get this far since 1990. While the teams’ primary concern is obviously how the next 4-7 games play out, we couldn’t help but wonder: what are the chances of these two teams returning next year (or at least in the near future)? Let’s take a look at the summers ahead for both franchises and see if we can answer that question for each side.

Vancouver depth will be challenged

The positive thing about the Canucks’ structure is that they locked up their big-time core players, often to contracts that are cap-friendly. The Sedin twins leave a beyond reasonable $12.2 million combined dent on the Canucks’ cap, Ryan Kesler is a steal at $5 million per year and Roberto Luongo receives a palatable (for now, at least) $5.33 million annual cap hit. The biggest steal of them all is Alex Burrows, who combines grit and goal-scoring ability (he scored 26 goals this season and 35 in 2009-10) for just a $2 million cap hit per year through the 2012-13 season. The team has a chunk of its defense wrapped up in Alex Edler ($3.25 million), Keith Ballard ($4.2 million) and ($4.5 million), but their defense is where the trouble starts.

Here are the Canucks’ restricted and unrestricted free agents going into July, with their previous cap hits and free agent status in parenthesis. Note: the salary cap is expected to be between $60.5-$63.5 million in 2011-12, so the Canucks will have approximately $14.8-$17.8 million with 13 players under contract.

Kevin Bieksa ($3.75 million, unrestricted) and Christian Ehrhoff ($3.1 million, unrestricted): Both defensemen already ranked among the top unrestricted free agent blueliners in a weak 2011 crop going into the playoffs, but they improved that by being the top two scorers for Vancouver in the postseason so far. They might be able to retain one, but keeping both might end up being too expensive.

Sami Salo ($3.1 million, unrestricted): Salo has been notoriously injury prone, so his return to hockey – let alone the Canucks – is in doubt. If he does, it will likely be on a short-term, discount rate. Andrew Alberts ($1.05 million) is unrestricted as well, but who knows if the team will even want him back.

Unrestricted depth forwards: Chris Higgins ($1.6 million), Raffi Torres ($1 million), Tanner Glass ($625K) and Jeff Tambellini ($500K) – The Canucks’ depth players didn’t score a ton, but they helped wear down opponents and make the team tough to play against. Higgins has been an especially good fit after being traded to Vancouver. Restricted depth forwards: Maxim Lapierre ($900K) and Jannik Hansen ($825K) – The team is likely to want both restricted free agent forwards back, but it might come down to money with them as well.

Boston will just try to make some tweaks

While the Canucks have 7-9 roster spots to fill (naturally they could fill some of those spots with minor league players/prospects), the Bruins roster probably won’t see too many huge changes. That’s not to say they lack a tough choice or two. Note: the Bruins will likely have about $8.3-$11.3 million to work with this summer.

Michael Ryder ($4 million, unrestricted) – Ryder’s offensive production hasn’t been reliable, but when he’s hot, he’s a dangerous forward. He produced two nice playoff runs (11 points in 2011, 13 in 08-09) that should really improve his value. The Bruins face a much tougher call about Ryder than many thought going into the postseason.

Tomas Kaberle ($4.25 million, unrestricted) – Not only is Kaberle an unlikely returnee, he probably damaged his free agent value substantially in his belly flop in Boston.

Brad Marchand ($821K) – The agitating rookie was strong in the regular season (18 goals, 41 points) and nearly essential in the playoffs (11 points in 18 postseason games). Despite Tyler Seguin’s explosive two-game burst, Marchand has still been the best rookie in Boston and should get a healthy raise.

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If you’re judging the two teams’ future outlooks by stability alone, the Bruins have a substantial advantage. The best part for Boston is that they have a nice amount of cash to make an upgrade (on defense, preferably), retain Marchand and make a judgment call regarding Ryder.

The Canucks have a nice amount of cap space to pick and choose which depth players and defensemen they want to retain and enjoy a nice boost from some affordable contracts. If GM Mike Gillis makes the right calls about paying the right people the right amounts, the Canucks could have a chance to remain among the league’s elite.

Overall, both teams have a great chance to make sure they avoid 17-year and 21-year droughts next time around.

Video: Tempers flare between Oilers and Predators, as Lucic and McLeod drop the gloves

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Things got feisty between the Edmonton Oilers and Nashville Predators on Friday.

It started in the second period after P.K. Subban took an elbow from Matt Hendricks along the end boards. Hendricks was immediately grabbed by Anthony Bitetto. Nothing really materialized from that, however the main event broke out between Milan Lucic and Nashville newcomer Cody McLeod.

Lucic landed some pretty heavy punches before the two players fell to the ice.

Video: Cam Ward loses it on Hornqvist, Hurricanes suffer ’embarrassing’ loss to Penguins

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Cam Ward had enough.

The Carolina Hurricanes goalie seemed particularly ticked off with Patric Hornqvist on Friday, twice taking out his frustrations in front of the net on the Pittsburgh Penguins forward.

Earlier in the game, Ward delivered a slash to the back of Hornqvist’s leg. In the third period, with the Hurricanes down five goals — that should give you an indication of what kind of night this was for Carolina — Ward snapped, delivering a punch with the blocker to Hornqvist after he slid into the Hurricanes puck stopper a split second after Evgeni Malkin jammed the puck in for a goal.

The final score? A 7-1 disaster of a loss to the Penguins, highlighted by Pittsburgh’s second-period offensive outburst. Ward played the entire game, allowing seven goals on 41 shots.

Carolina’s night also included star forward Jeff Skinner getting benched for the third period, after he took a pair of minor penalties — embellishment and unsportsmanlike conduct — in the second period.

“That’s pretty embarrassing. You don’t want to suffer a loss like that, especially in your home building,” Skinner told reporters.

The Hurricanes entered this game with a chance to jump into a wild card spot in the East.

Last week, the Hurricanes won four in a row, including a victory over Columbus, and continued their steady rise into the playoff hunt in the East. This week? It’s included losses to the Blue Jackets and Penguins.

The Hurricanes won’t have much time to think about this one. They travel to Columbus for a game Saturday evening.

With Claude Julien on the hot seat, Bruins lose late heartbreaker to Blackhawks

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The Boston Bruins have now lost three in a row, a losing streak that coincides with reports circulating that head coach Claude Julien’s job security is in jeopardy.

The bad news just keeps piling up for the Bruins: They’ve been shut out twice this week, as scoring continues to be an issue in Boston. They’re 22nd in the league in that category.

On Friday, the Bruins had their chances and once again held the edge in puck possession against the Chicago Blackhawks, finishing the game with 19 more shot attempts then the visitors, per hockeystats.ca.

But they couldn’t beat Scott Darling, who made 30 saves, and the real dagger came late in the third period when Marian Hossa scored off the rush with just over one minute remaining in regulation. Boston couldn’t even salvage a point out of this contest, losing 1-0.

The Bruins were all over the Blackhawks in the first period. They held a wide edge in shots on goal, but the Blackhawks were able to escape on the strength of some solid goaltending. They just hung around, and were able to break through in the third period.

The Bruins are still in a playoff position in the Atlantic Division. They are the top puck possession team in the league (although they have the second lowest shooting percentage at five-on-five) and Julien has had plenty of success behind that bench, helping guide the organization to a Stanley Cup championship in 2011 and a run to the Final in the lockout shortened campaign.

It would seem unfair to pin this roster’s shortcomings on the coach, especially given the offseason plans initially set out by Bruins management.

Though this loss likely puts Claude Julien Watch on high alert.

Sabres’ McCabe suffers shoulder injury, will not return versus Red Wings

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The Buffalo Sabres will be down a defenseman for the remainder of Friday’s game against the Detroit Red Wings.

Jake McCabe has left the game due to a shoulder injury suffered during the first period and will not return, the club stated during the second period.

Signed to a three-year, $4.8 million contract extension last summer, the 23-year-old McCabe has one goal and 10 points in 44 games this season for Buffalo

More recently, McCabe drew the immediate ire of the Winnipeg Jets after he delivered an open-ice hit on rookie Patrik Laine, who suffered a concussion on the play.