Colin Campbell

Canucks columnist preemptively fires up conspiracy talk relating to Colin Campbell and Bruins

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It certainly didn’t take long for one of the Vancouver media scribes to take a leap of faith into the abyss of foolish column writing ahead of the Stanley Cup finals.

With everything we’ve seen this postseason involving officiating (and it’s been pretty good for the most part) the last thing we’d think would be on anyone’s minds would be the potential for questionable officiating in the Stanley Cup finals. Of course, with the Bruins being involved and Gregory Campbell being a Bruins starter, as well as son of Colin Campbell from the NHL front office, it makes some people in Vancouver get a bit curious.

After all, the season got off to a roaring start with Colin Campbell’s email scandal in which he sent messages to then head of officiating (and once again on-ice official) Stephen Walkom looking to make sure certain referees kept an eye out for current (and injured) Bruins star forward Marc Savard being “the biggest faker going” while similarly berating officials for not getting calls right regarding his son’s play. While Bruins fans were a bit up in arms about that at the start of the year, Vancouver media has seized the attention the other way now that Campbell’s son Greg plays for the Bruins.

Enter The Province’s Tony Gallagher. Gallagher got his thoughts out about the potential for officiating shenanigans to come out in the Stanley Cup finals thanks to Colin’s job with the league and his son’s spot on the Bruins roster. Commence the hysterics, Tony.

For each round in the playoffs a referee works, he gets an extra $18,000 over and above his yearly salary. For a linesman it’s $12,000. So if you please the powers that be, you work lots. If you don’t please them for whatever reason, you don’t get to work in the playoffs. The officials working the final are the guys the league thinks are the best and as we’ve seen from the exchange of leaked memos a while back, Campbell can often be involved in those discussions.

And make no mistake, we’re not talking about any communication between these respective parties at any time. There’s no conspiracy. The officials know what their bosses need and know how to please them.

Now any official who happens to displease the powers for whatever reason—serious mistakes we’d like to believe—could find himself not working the final all of a sudden (although that wouldn’t affect his pay this year) and his employment considerations for the future would be open to question. Maybe he gets no playoff work the following year. Maybe it could be so serious that his contract might be re-considered in the future. The bottom line is these guys in the hockey operations department—of which one is the father of one of the games’ participants– control every aspect of an official’s employment.

No, no conflict of interest here.

Sigh.

These are concerns we raised earlier in the year (and often aside from that as well) when the email scandal broke loose but some of the crazy things to keep in mind here so as to fully debunk this nonsense are simple.

First, Campbell doesn’t rule on matters involving the Bruins because of his son’s spot on the roster. Mike Murphy handles all things that involve the Bruins when it comes to disciplinary matters. We’d like to assume this also extends to referee assignments in the playoffs. If Colin Campbell has a “hit squad” of guys he knows he can influence, it frankly doesn’t matter as it’s (likely) Murphy’s call to pick who does the games.

Secondly, if you really think Campbell has it out for Vancouver, remember that Campbell played for two seasons with the Canucks from 1980-1982 including a Stanley Cup finals appearance in 1982 against the Islanders. If anyone knows best as to how much a Stanley Cup for Vancouver would mean to the fans it’s Campbell from his days playing at Pacific Coliseum.

Finally, if you’re that desperate for a tinfoil hat conspiracy in the Stanley Cup finals you’re going to find something to latch on to when/if things go sour for your team whether you’re a Bruins or Canucks fan. Officials, ice quality, vendor food, weather… Anything will do for those who want to be their own version of the X-Files. Would you rather sit back and enjoy the hockey or be a part of the rambling lunatic fringe? You know what the right choice is.

While Campbell’s email scandal and how he handled himself when confronted that should still be addressed in some way in the offseason, it’s not going to play a part in how these teams loaded with talented professionals conduct themselves on the ice. Believing that the league is rigging things in favor of any team or against a country (in some Canadian fans’ minds) is the sort of thing better left to fans of other sports that go wild with such talk.

What about the Red Wings for Trouba?

SAN JOSE, CA - MARCH 27:  Jacob Trouba #8 of the Winnipeg Jets in action against the San Jose Sharks at SAP Center on March 27, 2014 in San Jose, California.  (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)
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Earlier today, PHT writer Adam Gretz made compelling cases for the Ducks, Bruins, Rangers, and Avalanche to take a run at Winnipeg defenseman Jacob Trouba.

But allow me to add one more team to the potential mix — the Detroit Red Wings, who could really use a 22-year-old, right-shot defenseman who skates well and has good offensive instincts.

The Wings also have a surplus of forwards to work with. While Dylan Larkin is probably untouchable, Gustav Nyquist and Tomas Tatar probably aren’t. Or perhaps a youngster like Andreas Athanasiou or Anthony Mantha would interest the Jets.

The question the Wings may run into, should they make a push for Trouba, is whether they’d be willing to part with Danny DeKeyser. The 26-year-old defenseman just signed a six-year contract extension, and there’s reason to believe the Jets may look for a youngish, left-shot d-man in return for Trouba.

That’s pure speculation, for the record. DeKeyser is an important part of the Wings. He’s a Michigan native and he comes with a reasonable, $5 million cap hit.  But it’s worth noting that, according to General Fanager, his no-trade clause doesn’t kick in until next summer.

At the very least, Ken Holland should be in touch with Kevin Cheveldayoff, if only to gauge the price for Trouba. The Red Wings’ GM said over the summer that he may look to trade for a defenseman around training-camp time, which happens to be right now.

“Part of this might be let’s get to September and see,” Holland said. “I’m hoping we’ve got 15, 16 NHL forwards and we’re positioned to do a deal.”

Torts not worried after Jackets get blown out twice — ‘Today was going to be a mess’

GLENDALE, AZ - DECEMBER 17:  Head coach John Tortorella of the Columbus Blue Jackets reacts on the bench during the second period of the NHL game against the Arizona Coyotes at Gila River Arena on December 17, 2015 in Glendale, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
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John Tortorella could only blame John Tortorella after the Blue Jackets got blown out in both their split-squad games Sunday against the Blues.

The Jackets dropped a 7-3 decision in St. Louis and lost 5-0 at home.

“Let’s not make any judgments here as far as today,” Tortorella said, per the Columbus Dispatch. “Today was going to be a mess. I give the guys credit. I’m not being negative about the team. They did what we asked of them (the first three days). They pushed. They gave it to us there and it suffers in these games.”

Tortorella, who runs notoriously tough training camps, wants to “make sure our conditioning is there by the 13th,” when the Jackets open the regular season.

Columbus plays its first three games at home, against Boston, San Jose and Chicago. A good start is going to be key for the Jackets, especially after starting last season 0-8-0.

Bernier back with Isles on training camp PTO

NEWARK, NJ - SEPTEMBER 25:  Steve Bernier #16 of the New York Islanders skates against the New Jersey Devils at the Prudential Center on September 25, 2015 in Newark, New Jersey. The Devils defeated the Islanders 4-2.  (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)
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New York liked enough of what it saw from Steve Bernier last season to offer him another kick at the can.

On Monday, the Isles announced that — for the second year in a row — Bernier would be coming to training camp on a PTO.

Last fall, Bernier parlayed his tryout into a one-year, $750,000 deal but only saw a limited body of work. The former first-round pick scored six points in 24 regular season games, then dressed for six playoff contests.

Bernier isn’t the only veteran forward attending Isles camp on a PTO, as longtime Devils winger Stephen Gionta is also there (Gionta and Bernier were once teammates in New Jersey).

There are holes to fill up front. The Isles lost three key forwards in free agency — Frans Nielsen, Matt Martin and Kyle Okposo — which will result in some of last year’s third- and fourth-line players getting bumped to more prominent roles.

Those promotions could bode well for Bernier and Gionta.

 

Sens to move AHL affiliate from Binghamton to Belleville

MANCHESTER, NH - FEBRUARY 13:  Center Jason Spezza of the Binghamton Senators smiles before the start of the American Hockey League All Star Skills Competition on February 13, 2005 at Verizon Wireless Arena in Manchester, New Hampshire.  (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
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The Ottawa Senators announced today that they’ve purchased the AHL franchise in Binghamton, N.Y. and will move it to Belleville, Ont. for the start of the 2017-18 season.

From the press release:

The Ottawa Senators and the City of Belleville have also agreed on an eight-year agreement to welcome the newly minted Belleville Senators to the city.

In order to properly accommodate a new professional AHL team, the City of Belleville will immediately undertake more than $18.5 million in important renovations to modernize Belleville’s Yardmen Arena and prepare it for professional hockey for the first time in the city’s history. 

The Baby Sens have played in Binghamton since 2002, winning a Calder Cup in 2011. AHL officials are reportedly working to secure another franchise for the city for the 2017-18 season.

Belleville to Ottawa is a mere 2.5-hour drive, according to Google. The Belleville Bulls were an OHL team that started playing in 1981 before moving to Hamilton in 2015.