Five Thoughts: Boston and Tampa Bay play a Game 7 for the ages

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A Game 7 worthy of being labeled a Game 7. This isn’t your 7-0 Game 7 no show or something along those orders. In this case, Boston and Tampa Bay did the way it was meant to be done. Breakneck pace, chances for both sides, tremendous goaltending all around, and ultimately one team going home a tough loser. For Boston, their success in beating Tampa Bay 1-0 ends in euphoria for a night for the Bruins before heading into the Stanley Cup finals and dealing with the league’s best team in Vancouver. On this night, there are more than five thoughts one could have but we’ll keep it in check.

1. When breaking down what we might see in this game, the one thing we figured would be Tampa Bay’s toughest thing to deal with would be if Boston settled in and played “Bruins hockey” and sure enough that’s just what they got a massive dose of. A tight checking game, suffocating pressure from the Bruins forecheck, sticks in passing lanes, and solid goaltending from Tim Thomas. In essence, it was the absolute worst thing Tampa Bay wanted to see in this game.

There was no secret game plan from Lightning coach Guy Boucher and while the Lightning’s best players played well, no one was able to rise above the Bruins defense. You want “Bruins hockey” you saw it in textbook form tonight and it’s all thanks to Claude Julien’s due diligence.

2. Let’s get the elephant out of the room and just move along. Nathan Horton scores the only goal of the game in a game where it was questionable and highly arguable whether or not he should’ve been playing in thanks to his water bottle antics after Game 6. In my mind we all knew deep down that Horton wouldn’t get suspended, after all, it’s “just some water” and the next game was Game 7.

Of course, doing anything to fans should be an instant non-starter so allowing water to be squirted on fans, provoked or not, is something any professional athlete should most definitely know better than to do. Horton’s fortunate that the game was played in Tampa Bay where fans aren’t nearly as excitable as those in say Philadelphia or New York City. It’ll be a point of contention raised by Lightning fans from here on out but one likely to be quickly forgotten, right or wrong, from now on.

3. After everything that went down in Game 7 and with how tight these two teams were all series and all season long, it came down to one play to decide the game. One poor defensive breakdown by Tampa Bay on what appeared to be a set play by the Bruins to get Nathan Horton motoring and going full speed toward the net worked. David Krejci gets the puck at the half-boards and draws the attention of two Lightning defenders opening up the slot where Horton cruised through untouched until too late getting a perfect pass from Krejci. It’s a thing of beauty for Boston to have a play work that way and for Tampa Bay, it’s going to be a very painful replay to watch. One mistake and it turns the series. It’s incredible that this series turned out to be just that close.

4. Let’s give it up for Dwayne Roloson. He’s 41 years-old, he played like crap through most of the series against Boston, sat out of Game 5 in favor of Mike Smith to get a breather, and then played the game of his life in Game 7. Roloson stopped 37 shots in the Game 7 loss, his first loss in an elimination game in his career, and it wasn’t for a lack of trying. He had numerous highlight reel saves and frustrated Bruins scorers all night long. If not for that aforementioned mistake that game might still be going on now.

While we don’t know what Roloson’s future holds for him, he’s quietly had a very solid playoff career. From Minnesota, to Edmonton, now to Tampa Bay he’s had just a fantastic career as a guy who gets stuff done in the playoffs. No Stanley Cup wins will certainly hurt how people look at him overall, but what a gamer.

5. Now the Bruins’ real test lays ahead of them in the form of Vancouver, and a very well rested Canucks team by the time both teams drop the puck for Game 1 on Wednesday. The instant snap judgment on the series is that the Canucks are going to be licking their chops to get after the Bruins. Add in the possibility that Manny Malhotra could be healthy enough to suit up for them and things stack up tall against Boston.

Of course, there’s a reason they play the games and while Bruins fans have been waiting all playoffs long for Milan Lucic to snap out of things, him getting to suit up for a potential seven game series against his hometown team (Lucic is from Vancouver) should be enough to light a forest fire underneath him. Boston hasn’t had to deal with a team as deep nor as talented all around as Vancouver yet. It will be fascinating to see in action.

Report: College free agent Alex Kerfoot opts to join Avalanche

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The wait appears to be over.

College free agent Alex Kerfoot has reportedly made his decision, choosing to join the Colorado Avalanche, according to Darren Dreger of TSN.

The news comes days after it was reported the New York Rangers were among the finalists to land the Harvard product, which would’ve provided a boost in depth at center for that club.

The 23-year-old center was also a target of the Vancouver Canucks, which is hardly surprising given Kerfoot is from that area and played his junior hockey in nearby Coquitlam.

Kerfoot was a finalist for the Hobey Baker Award this past season, after scoring 16 goals and 45 points in 36 games with Harvard.

More to come.

Islanders add Terreri as goaltending development coach

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The New York Islanders made a coaching move Wednesday, naming former NHL puckstopper Chris Terreri as a goalie development coach and goalie coach for the AHL’s Bridgeport Sound Tigers.

“Chris has a vast amount of knowledge and experience, both as a player and a coach,” said Islanders general manager Garth Snow. “We’re excited for him to work with our goalies at every level, as well as assist in our scouting process and to make his mark on this crucial position.”

Terreri appeared in 406 NHL games between 1986 and 2001, spending most of his career with the New Jersey Devils.

He then transitioned into coaching, spending the last eight years working as a goalie coach with the Devils.

Related: Under pressure: Jaroslav Halak

Under pressure: Claude Giroux

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This post is part of Flyers Day on PHT…

In 2014, Claude Giroux was a finalist for the Hart Trophy.

In the three years since, Giroux has experienced a rather significant drop in overall production, hitting a low point last season and leading general manager Ron Hextall when it was all over to give a defiant vote of confidence for the Flyers captain and highest paid player.

Giroux scored only 14 goals and 58 points while playing the full 82-game schedule. If there is a positive, it’s that on the power play, he was still highly productive with 31 points, which led a Flyers team that was 14th in the league with the advantage. Those 31 power play points for Giroux accounted about 53 per cent of his offensive output.

The NHL recently released its list of top-20 centers heading into next season, and Giroux didn’t make the list.

“Frustrating,” is how Giroux described last season to reporters after the Flyers failed to make the playoffs. “When you try to do something and you can’t do it — your mind wants to do something but your body doesn’t do it, it’s frustrating.

“You’ve got to keep working on your game, get stronger, faster. I mean, I’m very excited to … have a whole summer to work out and really do what I want to do.”

That last part is key.

Giroux, who will turn 30 years old in January, struggled through a hip problem during the 2015-16 season and had surgery in the spring. The timeline for recovery from the operation was about 10 to 12 weeks, which would cut into his summer training. There was perhaps some added rush to get back considering he played for Team Canada at the World Cup ahead of the NHL regular season.

One of his notable statements prior to joining the Canadian contingent was, “I don’t feel like I have a 60-year-old hip anymore.” That should provide an indication as to how much of a struggle it was for him prior to surgery. But this year, there is no World Cup. There was no off-season surgery with a lengthy recovery. Perhaps the bounce back season Flyers fans, management and coaching staff are all hoping for will take shape for Giroux after a full summer of training.

The Flyers are expected to have some young players in their lineup, and they no longer have Brayden Schenn, who was traded to St. Louis at the draft. Nolan Patrick could have an impact on the lineup as the second overall pick, but he too is coming off an injury-plagued season in the Western Hockey League.

Adding to the pressure on Giroux is that he’s under contract for five more years — with a no-movement clause, according to CapFriendly — at a cap hit of $8.275 million.

Looking to make the leap: Travis Sanheim

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This post is part of Flyers Day on PHT…

There appears to be a competition brewing for a spot on the Flyers blue line this upcoming season and 21-year-old Travis Sanheim is keen to throw his name into the mix.

Taken 17th overall in the 2014 NHL Draft, Sanheim has seen a rise in his offensive production, capping off his junior career in 2016 with 15 goals and 68 points, averaging well over a point per game in the WHL. He made the jump full-time to the professional ranks last season and provided more optimism for a Flyers franchise that has built a solid prospect pool.

In 76 games with the AHL’s Lehigh Valley Phantoms, Sanheim reached 10 goals and 37 points, finishing second in scoring among defensemen on that team. According to numerous reports, he followed that up with a strong showing at development camp earlier this summer, too.

Now, the goal is to come to training camp next month and earn a spot on the NHL club.

From CSN Philly:

Under general manager Ron Hextall’s philosophy of earn what you get, Sanheim will have his chance. But is there room? The Flyers are at a numbers crunch on the blue line. There is expected to be two spots open, presumably for Robert Hagg and Sam Morin, both of whom acquitted themselves well during their April NHL debuts.

“It’s going to come down to camp,” Sanheim told reporters in the summer. “I feel like I’m ready. I’m going to compete for a spot and until somebody tells me differently, that’s my goal. I’m coming to make the Flyers.

“It doesn’t matter what team you’re playing on. You have to work your way up the lineup. It’s just like me this year. I had to work my way up the lineup in the AHL just to start playing more and more minutes, and getting power play time and (penalty kill) time. It’s going to be the same thing. Nobody said it was going to be easy and I was going to be slotted into the first pairing.”

The Flyers took defensemen in the first rounds of three consecutive drafts, from 2013 to 2015, with Sanheim’s selection sandwiched in the middle. In 2015, Philly took Ivan Provorov at seventh overall. At just 20 years old, the Russian blue liner wasted little time in making an impact on the NHL roster, playing in all 82 games last season, scoring six goals and 30 points.

Morin and Sanheim have each had time to develop in the minors, with the former spending the past two seasons in the AHL, which should prove beneficial to the growth in their games heading into September.

“Whenever you play in the American League you get a leg up because you’ve been playing at a higher level of competition for a full year,” Hextall said, per the Courier-Post.

“You expect those guys to come in and be a little more NHL ready than a kid that’s coming right out of junior, but the players are gonna dictate who’s on our team. We’ll see how it goes.”