San Jose Sharks v Vancouver Canucks - Game Five

Comparing the 2010-11 Vancouver Canucks to the 1993-94 version

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Every once in a while, something so weird (and coincidental) happens that you just have to shake your head. While the Vancouver Canucks beat the San Jose Sharks with one of the strangest overtime game-winning goals you’ll ever see, maybe we should have seen the ultimate result coming from a mile away.

Just look at the similarities in the way the 2010-11 Canucks and 1993-94 model made it to the Stanley Cup finals. Both teams made their way through the Western Conference finals by scoring game-winning goals in overtime; Greg Adams scored the ’94 team’s winner on a rebound against Felix Potvin while Kevin Bieksa beat Antti Niemi on a rebound of a different kind. Strangely enough, both double OT wins happened on May 24, too. It’s almost as if Bieksa’s bizarre tally celebrated the 17th birthday of Adams’ goal.

Such similarities left us wondering: what things do these two Canucks teams have in common and what makes each squad different? Let’s take a look. (Hockey-Reference.com was an excellent source for some of this information.)

The 1993-94 Canucks at a glance

Record: 41-40-3 (second in Pacific division); Goals For: 279 (14th place out of 26 teams); Goals Against: 276 (17th out of 26); PP %: 18.82 (league average: 18.64); PK %: 81.66 (league average: 81.36)

The 2010-11 Canucks at a glance

Record: 54-19-9 (Presidents’ Trophy); Goals For: 262 (1st place out of 30); Goals Against: 185 (1st out of 30); PP %: 24.32 (league average: 18.02); PK %: 85.58 (league average: 81.98)

As you can see, the ’94 Canucks were average or worse going into the playoffs while the current Canucks put together one of the most dominant regular seasons in recent memory. Seriously, this bunch was at the top of almost every category imaginable. If you want to simplify things to death, the ’94 Canucks were David and this year’s Canucks are Goliath.

(Please note that scorers are ranked according to regular season totals, although playoff numbers will be provided as well.)

’93-94 top scorers

Pavel Bure- 107 Points (31 in playoffs)
Geoff Courtnall- 70 Points (19 in playoffs)
Clifford Ronning- 68 Points (15 in playoffs)
Trevor Linden – 61 Points (25 in playoffs)

’10-11 top scorers

Daniel Sedin- 104 Points (21 in playoffs)
Henrik Sedin- 94 Points (16 in playoffs)
Ryan Kesler- 73 Points (18 in playoffs)

Both teams featured a 100+ point scorer, although the two players couldn’t be much more different (aside for their supreme talents). Bure was a singular force – he scored 37 more points than Courtnall – while Daniel Sedin is considered 50 percent of a tremendous two-headed hockey monster. Bure was a flashy Russian stud who probably inspired the likes of Alex Ovechkin. Daniel is a funny looking redhead whose efficient game probably translates best to hardcore fans.

’93-94 scorers among defensemen

Jyrki Lumme -55 Points (13 in playoffs)
Jiri Slegr- 38 Points (n/a)
David Babych- 32 Points (8 in playoffs)

’10-11 scorers among defensemen

Christian Ehrhoff- 50 Points (11 in playoffs)
Alexander Edler- 33 Points (9 in playoffs)
Dan Hamhuis- 23 Points (6 in playoffs)
Kevin Bieksa- 22 Points (9 in playoffs)

High-scoring defensemen might be one of the better shared traits between the two teams. (I must admit, it’s a trip down memory lane to see the name “Jiri Slegr” again.)

’93-94 starting goalie

Kirk McLean

Regular season: 23-25-3, 2.99 GAA, 89.1 sv pct.; Playoffs: 15-9, 2.29 GAA, 92.8 save pct.

’10-11 starting goalie

Roberto Luongo

Regular season: 38-15-7, 2.11 GAA, 92.8 save pct.; Playoffs: 12-6, 2.29 GAA, 92.2 save pct.

Obviously, Luongo’s career outshines McLean’s by a wide margin. It’s stunning how similar their postseason numbers are, though, aren’t they? It’s almost as if someone offered McLean the chance to be Luongo for a few months.

***

These two teams entered their respective playoffs with very different expectations, yet they produced similar results up until the Stanley Cup finals. That magical ’94 run ended thanks to the famous play of Mark Messier and the New York Rangers. Whether it’s the Boston Bruins or Tampa Bay Lightning, this year’s Canucks will be the favorites going into the Cup finals this time around.

The question is: will their magic run out or will they be different from the ’94 version in the most important way by winning the first Stanley Cup in franchise history? We’ll just have to wait and see about that one.

Canucks will be without Rodin ‘until his knee strength and function return’

SASKATOON, SK - JANUARY 3:  Anton Rodin #18 of Team Sweden skates with the puck while being defended by David Warsofsky #5 of Team USA during the 2010 IIHF World Junior Championship Tournament Semifinal game on January 3, 2010 at the Credit Union Centre in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.  Team USA defeated Team Sweden 5-2.  (Photo by Richard Wolowicz/Getty Images)
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The last time Anton Rodin got into the Vancouver Canucks’ lineup, he sat on the bench the entire game.

Today, the Canucks announced that the 26-year-old winger has re-aggravated the same knee injury he suffered a year ago while playing in Sweden, and now he needs to rest.

“Our Canucks medical team and Anton have determined it is in his best interest to undergo a period of rest, followed by rehab, until his knee strength and function return,” said GM Jim Benning in a release. “Anton will undergo an MRI and orthopedic consult this week.”

In the same release, Benning confirmed that Rodin fell on his knee Jan. 6 against the Flames at Rogers Arena. It was the very next night in Calgary that he didn’t play a single shift, as the Canucks only had five healthy defensemen and were forced to dress 13 forwards.

“Rodin wasn’t 100 percent and once it gets past 10 minutes, it’s hard to get him in and once you do, it’s not fair to play him,” explained head coach Willie Desjardins, per The Province.

It’s a disappointing turn of events for Rodin, who waited a long time to make his NHL debut. He’s only been able to skate in three games for the Canucks, and his ice time was limited in all three.

Rodin started the season on injured reserve after re-aggravating his knee in the preseason.

Related: Anton Rodin is looking to make the leap

Banged-up Pens lose another — Cullen out 3-4 weeks with foot injury

PITTSBURGH, PA - MAY 30:  Matt Cullen #7 of the Pittsburgh Penguins skates against the San Jose Sharks in Game One of the 2016 NHL Stanley Cup Final at Consol Energy Center on May 30, 2016 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  (Photo by Justin K. Aller/Getty Images)
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Having already lost Kris Letang to a knee injury and Brian Dumoulin to a broken jaw, the Pens received more tough news in the health department on Tuesday — in the form of veteran forward Matt Cullen.

Cullen was hurt after taking a shot to the foot in last night’s wild 8-7 win over Washington and will miss the next 3-4 weeks, Pens head coach Mike Sullivan announced.

Cullen, 40, is one of the NHL’s oldest skaters but has been remarkably durable since joining Pittsburgh. In fact, he hasn’t missed a single game — he played in all 82 last season, then all 24 en route to the Stanley Cup, and is one of just seven Penguins to appear in all 43 games this year.

The cagey vet has been steady in terms of production as well. He has eight goals and 17 points thus far, which had him on pace to match last year’s impressive effort (16 goals, 32 points).

It’s a tough break for the Pens, but there is a silver lining. Shortly after announcing Cullen’s injury, Sullivan said Dumoulin would travel for an upcoming road swing through Montreal and Carolina.

 

Jamie Benn admits the stick-snapping rampages have to stop

Fans celebrate along with Dallas Stars left wing Jamie Benn (14) after a score by Benn in the first period of Game 3 of a first-round NHL hockey Stanley Cup playoff series game, Monday, April 21, 2014, in Dallas. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)
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Expect a more composed Jamie Benn when the Dallas Stars take on the Rangers tonight in New York.

At the very least, don’t expect another stick-breaking rampage like we saw yesterday in Buffalo.

“I have to do a better job with body language and my play on the ice,” Benn said, per the Dallas Morning News.

He also said of his recent play, “I wish I could say how I really feel, but it’s probably not good for TV.”

The Stars’ captain is understandably frustrated. His team is four points back of a wild-card spot, and his production, with 10 goals in 41 games, is down significantly compared to last season when he finished with 40 goals in 82 games and his team won the Central Division.

Tonight, it doesn’t get any easier. The Stars will take on a Rangers team that will have Mika Zibenajad in their lineup for the first time since Nov. 20. Meanwhile, the rest of the Blueshirts have had two days to recuperate after their 5-4 loss in Montreal on Saturday.

It’s estimated the Stars will need to go around 21-11-5 in their remaining 37 games to make the playoffs. So regardless of their frustrations, they’d best get on a roll soon. A better performance from their captain would be a good start.

Preds claim AHL All-Star Hunt off waivers from Blues

NEWARK, NJ - DECEMBER 09:  Brad Hunt #77 of the St. Louis Blues skates against the New Jersey Devils at the Prudential Center on December 9, 2016 in Newark, New Jersey.  (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)
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With P.K. Subban, Roman Josi and Petter Granberg all out with their respective injuries, the Nashville Predators are a little thin on the blueline.

So on Tuesday, they set about adding some depth.

Brad Hunt, the 28-year-old offensive defenseman, has been claimed off waivers from St. Louis, per TSN. Hunt has spent most of this year with the Blues’ AHL affiliate in Chicago but, in limited time with the big club, has shown pretty well.

The Bemidji State product has five points in nine games for the Blues, while averaging 13:36 TOI per night. He was widely praised for his passing ability, and how quickly he helped the Blues transition from defense to offense.

“[Hunt] just moves the puck,” Blues coach Ken Hitchcok said earlier this year, per the Post-Dispatch. “He gets himself out of trouble, he gets the team out of trouble. He’s a smart player.”

That offensive output is what Hunt’s known for — a consistently productive AHLer, Hunt recently made his fourth career All-Star Game on the strength of 29 points in 23 games for the Wolves.