Boston Bruins v Tampa Bay Lightning - Game Four

Dwayne Roloson or Mike Smith? Guy Boucher faces tough Game 6 decision

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Contrary to my instinctive guess, Tampa Bay Lightning coach Guy Boucher opted to start Mike Smith instead of Dwayne Roloson in Game 5. The Boston Bruins beat Smith and the Lightning 3-1 in that contest, taking a 3-2 series lead, thus leaving Boucher with a conundrum going into Game 6. Will he give Smith another chance or go back to Roloson with the team on the verge of elimination?

Why the Lightning should start Smith

Many will study the titanic triumph of Tim Thomas and think that Smith was the weak link of that game (especially since Smith allowed two goals on 19 shots), but Smith didn’t have much of a chance on either Bruins tally. The Lightning carried most of the play in Game 5, but Boston managed a few breaks and Thomas stood on his head after allowing a goal on the first shot he faced.

Smith hasn’t made many mistakes in his scant 2011 playoff appearances. He stopped all 29 of the shots he faced in two relief stints for Roloson in this series, putting aside all eight in Tampa Bay’s 6-5 Game 2 loss and stopping 21 out of 21 during the Bolts’ come-from-behind win in Game 4. Again, it’s tough to beat him up too much for the two one-timers that foiled him in Game 5, so he really hasn’t allowed a softie in the postseason so far.

The two biggest strengths Smith brings to the ice are his size and puck-handling skills. He must have absorbed some passing lessons from his days backing up Marty Turco in Dallas because he’s very comfortable moving the puck around. That stands in stark contrast to both Roloson and Thomas, who are often an adventure when the puck is on their sticks.

While you won’t confuse Smith with Martin Brodeur from a talent standpoint, his passing skills make him almost as nice of a fit for Guy Boucher’s 1-3-1 system as Brodeur was for Jacques Lemaire’s neutral zone trap.

The advantages of going back to Roloson

Scrappy old Roloson might not be as polished as the more-orthodox Smith is in some areas, but he is significantly more playoff-proven. Roloson has played in 48 postseason games in his career (going 27-17) while all three of Smith’s career playoff appearances came in this series. If that doesn’t underscore the experience disparity enough for you, there’s also Roloson’s uncanny 6-0 record in elimination games.

It’s also tough to deny the notion that Roloson got them this far and deserves a chance to see this thing through. Even after getting pulled in two of his four starts against Boston, Roloson still has a sterling overall save percentage (92.5) and a solid 2.51 GAA in the 2011 playoffs.

Roloson has been the go-to guy since he was traded to Tampa Bay, so a vote for Rollie is a vote for stability.

Plenty of motivation for both goalies

One interesting subplot is that these goalies will be unrestricted free agents this summer. They’re both hoping to improve their stations in the free agent market by winning big playoff games and each one wants to prove they are still relevant at the NHL level. The 29-year-old Smith wants to show that he deserves at least a backup/1b role while the 41-year-old Roloson might want to play another season before hanging up his pads.

If keeping their team in the playoffs wasn’t much of a dangling carrot, securing a job for next season should provide ample motivation for both Smith and Roloson.

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The bright side of this story is that Boucher has two solid options in net. Roloson is more likely to “steal” a win while Smith’s puck-moving skills mesh nicely with Tampa Bay’s defensive system. To some extent, Boucher has nothing to lose … unless his team loses, of course.

Video: Beagle gets stick stuck in visor

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Through 40 minutes of action in Game 1 of the second round series between Pittsburgh and Washington and we’ve already seen some big moments, along with a pretty unusual one.

Beagle ended up with a stick lodged into his visor towards the end of the second frame. He tried to get it out himself, but ended up having to go to the bench for assistance. You can see that below:

Stamkos close to game shape, but return might be weeks or months away

Tampa Bay Lightning forward Steven Stamkos (91) competes in the hardest shot competition at the NHL hockey All-Star game skills competition Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
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Steve Stamkos began to practice again on Tuesday and he was back out there on Wednesday and Thursday, which some might interpret as him being close to returning. It seems premature to say that definitively.

“It could be weeks. It could be months,” Stamkos said of his timetable, per ESPN. “That’s the tough part.”

The problem isn’t getting back into game shape after undergoing vascular surgery in early April. He feels he’s already close to reaching that objective. The issue is that Stamkos is on blood thinners, which prevents him from taking any contact. It remains to be seen how long he’ll be on blood thinners.

For what it’s worth, Tampa Bay’s Andrei Vasilevskiy underwent the same surgery and was out for two months and the original timetable provided on April 4 for Stamkos was one-to-three months. So based on that, it sounds like it would be surprising if he returned anytime soon.

Bergeron, Kesler, Kopitar named Selke finalists

Boston Bruins center Patrice Bergeron celebrates after scoring against the Montreal Canadiens during the second period of an NHL hockey game Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2016, in Montreal. (Ryan Remiorz/The Canadian Press via AP)
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Will Patrice Bergeron join Bob Gainey as the only players to have ever won the Selke Trophy four times?

That’s a distinct possibility after the Bruins center was named as a finalist along with Anaheim’s Ryan Kesler and Los Angeles’ Anze Kopitar.

The Selke Trophy honors the league’s top defensive forward and for three of the last four years, that distinction has gone to Bergeron. However, Kesler and Kopitar have been popular with the voters of this award as well.

Kopitar has finished second in the voting in each of the previous two campaigns while Kesler won back in 2011, though he finished outside of the top-five in each of the last three years prior to the 2015-16 campaign.

Among the trio, Kesler excelled this season on the draw with a 58.5% success rate, which was good for second in the league among forwards who took at least 200 faceoffs. Bergeron was up there too, winning 57.1% of his draws while Kopitar posted a 53.5%. Meanwhile, Bergeron ranked seventh in the NHL with 67 takeaways compared to Kesler’s 39 and Kopitar’s 43. Where Kopitar stood out was in plus/minus as he finished second in the league at plus-34. Kesler was plus-five and Bergeron was plus-12.

Kopitar similarly led the trio with a 57.4% Corsi For versus Bergeron’s 55.9% and Kesler’s 52.9%.

Capitals get Orpik back for series opener

Washington Capitals defenseman Brooks Orpik (44) celebrates his goal with teammates on the bench during the third period of an NHL hockey game against the New Jersey Devils, Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016, in Washington. The Capitals won 4-3. (AP Photo/Nick Wass)
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Capitals defenseman Brooks Orpik missed half of Washington’s first round series, but he’s back in time for the opener against his former team.

Orpik last played on April 18 and was regarded as questionable going into tonight’s contest against Pittsburgh. He’s expected to be paired with John Carlson throughout the contest.

Washington’s other projected pairings are Karl Alzner and Matt Niskanen as well as Dmitry Orlov and Nate Schmidt.

Orpik was limited to 41 games during the 2015-16 regular season, but when he did play he averaged 19:48 minutes per contest. He also recorded 125 hits and 102 blocked shots despite missing half the season. The 35-year-old blueliner got his start with Pittsburgh and played in 703 regular season contests with them and an additional 92 postseason contests. This is his second season with Washington.