Simon Gagne, Ryan Malone, Dennis Seidenberg

Both the Lightning and Bruins have a lot to work on going into Game 3


A chronic optimist can find reasons for positivity for the Boston Bruins and Tampa Bay Lightning after Boston’s 6-5 win in Game 2. The Bruins’ perspective is fairly obvious: they tied the series up and witnessed a possible breakthrough night for their talented but struggling rookie Tyler Seguin. It doesn’t take much to find a silver lining for Tampa Bay, either. Ultimately, they earned one win on the road and ended Game 2 with some momentum.

Yet a realist will point out that each team has plenty to work on. Let’s take a look at some of the issues plaguing both teams as the series shifts to Tampa Bay.

Bruins won, but shouldn’t get fat and happy.

Yes, Boston tied things up and looked dominant at times, but there was a lot to worry about. If you ask me, the Lightning’s advantage in foot speed has been painfully apparent at times. Tampa Bay produced a disturbing array of semi-breakaways and full-fledged ones, but Tim Thomas was able to bail his team out on most (if not all) of them. Just watch this montage to see how different this game could have been.

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Making big saves like that is what separates the unorthodox Thomas from mere mortals. Still, how many times can Zdeno Chara and lesser Bruins defensemen find themselves flat-footed without dire results? I’m a fan of Dennis “Pain Sponge” Seidenberg, but not enough to justify the 31 minutes of ice time he received in Game 2.

Overall, leaky defense is the biggest concern for the Bruins. They barely managed to hold onto a 6-3 lead in the third period, requiring a desperate Thomas save on a Marc-Andre Bergeron rebound shot to seal things up. After dominating the first, Boston allowed Tampa Bay to out-shoot them 30-17 in the last two periods. They can’t expect Thomas to save them over the long haul, not with Tampa Bay’s talent at the forward position.

Thomas was a big reason why the Bruins won, but he allowed a goal or two he regretted in this game. Perhaps the most stoppable one came when Vincent Lecavalier beat him five-hole to score Tampa Bay’s third goal. In a tighter game, a regrettable goal would be a lot more damaging for Thomas and the Bruins.

Still, the Bruins feel a lot better about life tonight than they did on Saturday night.

Tampa Bay should be concerned, too.

Like I mentioned previously, the Lightning can take some positives into Game 3. They “earned home ice advantage” by winning on of the two games in Boston and put a lot of heat on the Bruins in the third period. They also received goals from star players after winning Game 1 thanks to support players.

That being said, it’s easy to wonder if the Lightning are running out of luck. As I pointed out in PHT’s preview post, the Lightning have been severely out-shot through the first two rounds.

That trend was tolerable when Dwayne Roloson was standing on his head, but he allowed six goals in two periods before getting the hook for Mike Smith in the third period. Many of those tallies weren’t really his fault, but one must wonder if Roloson’s improbable run hit a wall of reality. The Lightning might not need superlative goaltending from Roloson every night, but if he regresses to the point of being average, Tampa Bay could be in trouble.


Every NHL team sports some warts, even one that manages to make the final four in the playoffs. Still, the Bruins and Lightning have some major concerns, especially in their own end. Whichever team adjusts and improves will likely find their way to the Stanley Cup finals.

Considering their competition in the West, they better work out the kinks by then.

PHT Morning Skate: Mike Commodore had an interesting shift as an Uber driver

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PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

–Former NHL defenseman Mike Commodore took a shift as an Uber driver and it sounds like he had a good time. (TSN)

–Blackhawks defenseman Duncan Keith now has his own cereal and it’s called “Keith Krunch”. (The Athletic)

Pavel Datsyuk‘s hands are still magic. (Top)

–Capitals rookie Zach Sanford is still getting used to life in the NHL. (Washington Post)

–Seven goalies the Los Angeles Kings might be able to trade for. (Sportsnet)

–The Detroit Red Wings helped Blue Jackets rookie Zach Werenski fall in love with hockey. (Columbus Dispatch)

Even the Flames’ struggling power play capitalized against the Blackhawks’ struggling penalty kill


The Calgary Flames had the league’s worst power play at just four per cent coming into Monday’s game against Chicago.

Yeah. Awful.

The Blackhawks had the league’s worst penalty kill at just 42.9 per cent, which is also awful, although their issues go deeper than that aspect.

So, of course special teams played an important role in this game. Despite their previous struggles with the advantage, the Flames scored twice on the power play, on goals from Sam Bennett and Sean Monahan, taking their turn capitalizing on Chicago’s early-season difficulties short handed.

The Flames finished two-for-five on the power play, giving them three power play goals in 30 opportunities so far. They jumped all the way to 27th in the league in that category (!!) at 10 per cent. The Blackhawks have given up 14 power play goals against on 26 chances.

“We’ve got to get that out of our game,” Jonathan Toews told CSN Chicago. “As I’ve been saying, the penalty kill usually translates from our effort 5-on-5 and if we’re not starting games well, then we’re getting behind. Obviously [we’re] giving up power plays to begin with and we’re not killing the penalty kills that we’re on. Unfortunate to get behind again tonight.”

This is not the company you’d expect the Blackhawks to be keeping.

The Blackhawks did come back to force overtime, but they ultimately lost 3-2 in the shootout.

Former Blackhawk Kris Versteeg scored the only goal in the deciding breakaway contest, giving Calgary the win.

While the Flames power play came alive for this game, the play of goalie Brian Elliott was significant.

He, too, had struggled mightily with three losses in three starts, and a .839 save percentage, prompting his former teammate Jake Allen to say Flames fans shouldn’t be worried about Elliott despite his dreadful start.

Against Chicago, Elliott made 31 saves on 33 shots and then made five saves in the seven-round shootout.

The Habs took a chance signing Radulov and (so far) they’ve been rewarded

MONTREAL, QC - OCTOBER 20:  Alexander Radulov #47 of the Montreal Canadiens looks on during the NHL game against the Arizona Coyotes at the Bell Centre on October 20, 2016 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.  The Montreal Canadiens defeated the Arizona Coyotes 5-2.  (Photo by Minas Panagiotakis/Getty Images)
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The Montreal Canadiens took a chance on Alexander Radulov.

The cost? One year at $5.75 million, which is a significant investment for a 30-year-old player with plenty of talent but past off-ice discipline issues. So far, Radulov has been a welcomed addition to a Habs lineup that needed a skilled forward capable of putting up good numbers and taking a top-six role.

The success — or lack of — for the Habs will always focus around the play and health of goalie Carey Price.

But Radulov is off to a nice start to the season, which should provide some optimism for Canadiens fans after a disappointing 2015-16 season and the tumultuous summer that followed.

He entered Monday’s game against the Philadelphia Flyers with two points in five games, but had solid puck possession numbers. Against the Flyers, he was once again a central figure for the Habs on the attack.

And the production followed.

He had a three-point night, setting up Shea Weber‘s goal in the second period — Weber’s slap shot busted the stick of Brayden Schenn and still had enough to get by goalie Steve Mason — and Brendan Gallagher for the eventual winner late in the third period.

Radulov then secured the win with an empty-net goal, giving him five points in six games. The Habs, following their 3-1 win over the Flyers, remain the only team in the league without a regulation loss.

Radulov entered the season as a potential X-factor for the Habs.

General manager Marc Bergevin received plenty of criticism for trading P.K. Subban. But so far, the returns from signing Radulov have been promising for the Habs.

Video: Shea Weber scores with blistering slap shot that destroyed Schenn’s stick


In case you didn’t know by now, here is more evidence that Shea Weber possesses a devastating slap shot.

The Montreal Canadiens defenseman on Monday scored his second goal of the season, once again deploying his shot from the blue line. This time, he ripped a shot that busted the stick of Brayden Schenn, who was trying to get into the shooting lane, and still had enough behind it to beat Flyers’ goalie Steve Mason.

That gave the Habs the lead.

The Flyers responded later on in the second period on Jakub Voracek‘s third goal of the season.