Tyler Seguin, Chris Kelly, Dennis Seidenberg, Michael Ryder

Tyler Seguin, Bruins explode in second period, hang on to tie series 1-1

A lot of people watched Tyler Seguin’s astounding four-point second period and wondered what Boston Bruins coach Claude Julien was thinking when he made him a healthy scratch for two rounds. Yet it’s quite possible Seguin benefited from having fresh legs and the motivation to never watch a playoff game in street clothes again. Either way, it’s hard to imagine the second pick of the 2010 NHL Entry Draft being a healthy scratch again anytime soon.

If ever, really.

Boston 6, Tampa Bay 5; Series tied 1-1

There really wasn’t a dull moment in this game, which surprised many considering the defense-first strategies both teams normally employ. The Lightning will inspire yet another round of “striking fast” puns thanks to Adam Hall’s goal, which happened just 13 seconds into the game. The Bruins dominated most of the first frame and tied it up 1-1, but Steven Stamkos sent a brilliant blind pass to set up a Martin St. Louis 2-1 goal with just seven seconds left.

That goal left the Boston crowd stunned, but it turned out be a prelude to two more dramatic periods.

Tyler Seguin, Bruins chase Dwayne Roloson in the second period

In a second period some might call “The Revenge of the Law of Averages,” the Bruins finally took over Game 2. Obviously, the biggest story was Seguin, who set a single-game playoff record for a teenager with four points (according to Versus). We’ll have more on his special night in a separate post, but if you need a taste of just how special he was, check out this video.

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Seguin wasn’t the only Bruins forward who dominated in the second period, even if he clearly produced his first true star-making moment. Michael Ryder scored two goals himself, for example. Another heartening trend for the Bruins was their improved power play (and, by extension, Tomas Kaberle, who produced two assists). That much-derided unit produced two goals on six opportunities and plenty of shots in the process.

It’s important to note the timely (and difficult) saves made by Tim Thomas. The Lightning received a disturbing amount of (partial or full) breakaway opportunities, but Thomas made some huge saves to maintain what became a 6-3 lead. In keeping with the theme of this crazy game, the game was far from over even if elderly godsend Dwayne Roloson was chased from the Lightning net.

Tampa Bay storms back in third

As Keith Jones pointed out in the post-game recap, the Bruins missed Patrice Bergeron the most when they were trying to hold onto what should have been a secure 6-3 lead in the final frame. Say what you will about this Lightning team, they won’t just slump their shoulders and quit.

They didn’t end up tying the game, but the Bolts can take some momentum going into their home games. Stamkos continued his own excellent night by firing an absolute laser beam over Thomas to make it 6-4, giving his team hope once again.

Dominic Moore ended up making it 6-5 on a bizarre interchange. It seemed like Victor Hedman scored a goal seconds before a wild scrum, but Moore was wise to punch it back in as Thomas was bowled over. Check out footage of that moment below.

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That goal came with almost seven minutes left in the third, so there were plenty of breath-taking moments. If you ask me, the closest the Lightning came when Marc-Andre Bergeron nearly scored on a rebound attempt 16:09 into the third. Thomas ended up stopping it, though, and the Bruins held on for dear life with some resourceful last-minute plays.

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This was a wild and memorable game, so we’ll have a little more on Seguin’s special night and how each team should feel going into Game 3 shortly.

Sens demote former first-rounder Puempel

Matt Puempel
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Looks like Matt Puempel won’t be making the leap after all.

Puempel, the subject of Ottawa’s “looking to make the leap” profile during our Team of the Day series, has been sent down to AHL Binghamton one day prior to the Sens’ opener against Buffalo.

Puempel, taken by Ottawa in the first round (24th overall) at the ’11 draft, made his big-league debut last season and looked as though he’d stick around — only to suffer a high ankle sprain after 13 games, and miss the rest of the season.

The 22-year-old came into this year’s camp looking to secure a full-time position at the big league level, but was beaten out by Shane Prince for the final forward spot on the roster.

To be fair, contract status probably played a role. Prince would’ve had to clear waivers to get down to Bingo, whereas Puempel didn’t.

A former 30-goal scorer in the American League, Puempel is expected to get another look with Ottawa this season.

Report: Torres won’t appeal 41-game suspension


Sounds like Raffi Torres is accepting his punishment.

Per Sportsnet, Torres won’t appeal his 41-game suspension for an illegal hit to the head of Anaheim’s Jakob Silfverberg.

The report comes just days after the NHL’s Department of Player Safety levied one of the longest disciplinary rulings in league history, citing both the severity of the Silfverberg hit and Torres’ lengthy history of suspensions, fines and warnings.

There was some thought, however, that Torres would try to challenge the ruling.


He does have a history of success in that department. In 2012,Torres successfully appealed his suspension for a headshot on Chicago’s Marian Hossa, and had his punishment reduced from 25 games to 21.

Torres also isn’t considered a “repeat offender” under the current collective bargaining agreement, as his last suspension came in 2013.

Of course, part of that clean record is due to the fact he hasn’t played much. Torres has largely been sidelined by injury for the last two seasons, missing all of last year with knee problems.

Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman delved further into the repeat offender thing in his latest 30 Thoughts column:

If you read the relevant sections of the CBA, the league takes the position that the repeat offender status is only applicable to fines. Repeaters are fined on a per-game basis, non-repeaters on a per-day basis. (The former is more expensive, because there are fewer games than days in an NHL season.) However, if you go to Section 18.2, among the factors taken into account are, “the status of the offender and, specifically, whether the Player has a history of being subject to Supplementary Discipline for On-Ice Conduct.”

So, in the NHL’s view, a player’s history is relevant, even if longer than 18 months ago.

Should the report prove accurate and Torres doesn’t appeal, he will be eligible to return to action on Jan. 14, when the Sharks take on the Oilers.