Tampa Bay Lightning v Boston Bruins - Game One

Should the NHL do anything about Bruins’ late-game message-sending?


One of the curious things about watching a hockey game is how teams handle themselves in a blow out or when the decision in the game seems very apparent. Sometimes a team will give up completely and lose every battle possible. Other times teams look to light a fire for future games by starting up with some of the rough stuff both legal and not legal. At the end of last night’s Game 1 between Boston and Tampa Bay, the Bruins didn’t take kindly to being down  5-2 in the closing seconds and ultimately losing Game 1.

With 37 seconds remaining, players came together along the boards. Nathan Horton and Milan Lucic were caught up with a pair of different messy plays. Horton caught Dominic Moore with a sucker punch intended to start things up while Lucic came out of nowhere to blast defenseman Victor Hedman. Both Horton and Lucic were given roughing minors and ten-minute misconduct penalties. The Lightning then responded by putting their third and fourth line players out on the resulting 5-on-3 power play that wrapped up the game.

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Normally you’d chalk these things up as a “boys will be boys” scenario except that in 2009, Philadelphia’s Dan Carcillo was fined for his late-game antics in trying to send a message to the Pittsburgh Penguins after Carcillo went after Maxime Talbot. Clearly Boston was looking for some kind of spark against Tampa Bay to carry over into Game 2, but is this a situation that calls for the league to step in? Given the edict that went out two seasons ago to try and curtail the so-called message sending, it should but we all know how good the league is at fully practicing what they preach.

Boston played a miserable Game 1, one that saw them play poorly in their own end and get beaten up on the scoreboard and the Bruins feed off the physical play. Giving themselves something to latch on for Game 2 to give themselves a spark makes sense because it can get the Lightning to do something they didn’t do in Game 1: Retaliate.

Some coaches will complain to the media about getting calls to get the attention of officials, others call players out, sometimes a team needs to light a fire in a different way. If motivation to win the Stanley Cup isn’t enough to get a team going then perhaps that team has more issues than they’re letting on.

In this case, Boston was frustrated with how Tampa Bay turned the game on them and forced them to play catchup all night. Boston doesn’t want to play that game and while the Bruins’ power play has been awful, getting the Lightning to take more penalties is never a bad thing.

Should the NHL step in here? It seems clear what the Bruins were intending to do but is it enough to warrant the league’s attention?

PHT Morning Skate: 10 years of Ovechkin; 10,000 days with Lamoriello

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PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

Looking back at 10 years of Alex Ovechkin with the Washington Capitals, in case the above video made you want more. (CSN Mid-Atlantic)

David Conte spent 10,000 days with Lou Lamoriello and lived to tell about it. (TSN)

Want to spot some contract year guys? Here are 32 pending restricted free agents. (Sportsnet)

NHL GMs are starting to sniff around with the 2015-16 season about to kick off. (Ottawa Sun)

Some backstory on Zack Kassian that was passed around on Twitter last evening. (Canucks website)

Hey, you can’t say Raffi Torres hasn’t literally paid for his ways:

This is some quality chirping between Jaromir Jagr and Matthew Barnaby:

Cocaine in the NHL: A concern, but not a crisis?

Montreal Canadiens v Minnesota Wild

Does the NHL have a cocaine problem?

TSN caught up with deputy commissioner Bill Daly, who provided some fascinating insight:

“The number of [cocaine] positives are more than they were in previous years and they’re going up,” Daly said. “I wouldn’t say it’s a crisis in any sense. What I’d say is drugs like cocaine are cyclical and you’ve hit a cycle where it’s an ‘in’ drug again.”


Daly said that he’d be surprised  “if we’re talking more than 20 guys” and then touched on something that may be a problem: they don’t test it in a “comprehensive way.”

As Katie Strang’s essential ESPN article about the Los Angeles Kings’ tough season explored in June, there are some challenges for testing for a drug like cocaine. That said, there are also some limitations that may raise some eyebrows.

For one, it metabolizes quickly. Michael McCabe, a Philadelphia-based toxicology expert who works for Robson Forensic, told ESPN.com that, generally speaking, cocaine filters out of the system in two to four days, making it relatively easy to avoid a flag in standard urine tests.

The NHL-NHLPA’s joint drug-testing program is not specifically designed to target recreational drugs such as cocaine or marijuana. The Performance Enhancing Substances Program is put into place to do exactly that — screen for performance-enhancing drugs.

So, are “party drugs” like cocaine and molly an issue for the NHL?

At the moment, the answer almost seems to be: “the league hopes not.”

Daly goes into plenty of detail on the issue, so read the full TSN article for more.