Sean Bergenheim, Victor Hedman

Five Thoughts: Red flags for Boston, kudos for Tampa Bay

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If anything, last night’s Game 1 between Tampa Bay and Boston proved to us that we probably don’t know as much about hockey as we think we do. Our predictions for the series might not turn out too well if the Boston team that came out in Game 1 keeps coming back. Tampa’s handy throttling of the Bruins sent a strong message that they are not to be trifled with. Five Thoughts today deals with what we saw last night.

1. One of the things we were concerned about in this series is how both Guy Boucher and Claude Julien’s defensive strategizing might slow things down and turn the series into a less-than-exciting brand of hockey. It then goes to figure that the Lightning would throw the Bruins a curveball and pressure them all night long instead of sitting back and waiting for them to attack.

Tampa brought the pressure and the Bruins seemed lost as to what they could do, in particular Tomas Kaberle. Changing things up like that clearly bothered the Bruins. Does Boucher keep switching things up to keep the B’s off guard or is this the game plan for the series? Julien’s a smart coach so he’ll find a way to counter but tonight they looked bad and the frustration boiled over at the end of the game with both Milan Lucic and Nathan Horton getting tossed from the game for roughing incidents. Losing their cool like that will only lead to Boston getting knocked out of the playoffs.

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2. Should the Bruins problems on the power play continue, and if Game 1 is any indication they will, then the first guy run out of town in Boston will be Tomas Kaberle. Kaberle was acquired to help an already rough Bruins power play unit and set them straight and turn their power play from a hindrance to a cohesive scoring unit. Instead, the Bruins are looking as lost as ever and Kaberle’s inability to help quarterback their unit  is exacerbating the problem.

For one reason or another, Kaberle is seemingly unwilling to shoot. Opting to pass is good to help guys get going, but when defenses aren’t even respecting his shot and dropping off to cover other players, it turns it into an awkward 4-on-4 situation instead of a power play. That kind of action won’t get it done and now the Bruins are looking like a team trying too hard when they get on the power play. If they were squeezing their sticks too tight, they’d have turned to dust by now. It’s late in the year to discover a magic power play elixir but the Bruins must find it fast.

3. The one guy that could help out on the power play isn’t getting the chance to play much at all. Rookie Tyler Seguin got to play in his first playoff game last night and scored a goal and added an assist. With that sort of production you’d think he would see more of the ice. Instead, Seguin only played 9:38 of the game, better than just Dan Paille and Shawn Thornton. Seguin is an offensive talent meant to do offensive things and he’s played power play time in the past. For a team that’s in desperate need of productivity on the power play and more offense, Seguin could be what they need.

Of course that leads into the question of why coach Claude Julien seems to shy away from playing Seguin at all. Julien’s shown more than enough love for veteran players over rookies in the past. We saw him butt heads with Phil Kessel over his effort level in the past scratching him from playoff games only to see Kessel respond by scoring in bunches when put back in. This isn’t the same sort of battle with Seguin, but Julien’s reticence to use him is head-scratching. Clearly Seguin has skills and he showed that in Game 1, let’s hope he gets to see more ice time because of it.

4. One area to give Tampa Bay credit for is their ability to resist the physical irritation of the Bruins and how they played the role of the wise guy and goaded Boston into taking bad penalties. The Bruins are a tough team and a very proud one and they won’t take kindly to any shenanigans going on on the ice. Last night we saw Johnny Boychuk, Milan Lucic, and Nathan Horton all get goaded into going too far while the Lightning resisted the Bruins’ overly physical efforts to irk them. Tampa Bay was built to not be a fighting team and while some have accused them of being a team that dives to get calls, it’s clear that they won’t be retaliating the way the Bruins want them to. With the B’s so hot under the collar, they’ll have to learn to watch themselves when opting to mix it up with Tampa.

5. The most perplexing part to the Lightning is how they’re getting so much depth scoring. Everyone wants to focus in on Martin St. Louis, Vincent Lecavalier, and Steven Stamkos but when their third line is getting just as many scoring chances and finishing their opportunities, it makes them a handful to stop. After all, when you’ve got three lines all evenly capable of scoring on you that makes defending against them a major pain.

Spending your effort defending that big three along with Simon Gagne and Teddy Purcell as well and then having to deal with Sean Bergenheim, Dominic Moore, and Steve Downie who are all having huge playoffs is a nightmare. The Bruins will need to find ways to bottle them all up as well as not giving them a chance on the power play. Giving them power play opportunities means they can get guys like Marc-Andre Bergeron into the act as well so he can bomb away from the point… Just like he did in Game 1.

Stars put Spezza on injured reserve, recall Faksa from AHL Texas

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Sitting three points out of top spot in the Central Division and on the eve of an important divisional clash on home ice with the Chicago Blackhawks, the Dallas Stars have placed center Jason Spezza on injured reserve retroactive to Thursday, the club announced on Friday.

Spezza, 32, was injured during Thursday’s game against the Colorado Avalanche. The Stars can move back to within a point of Chicago for the division lead with a regulation win on Saturday.

In 52 games this season, Spezza has 18 goals and 40 points, which ties him with Patrick Sharp for fourth on the team in total points.

With Spezza out, the Stars recalled 22-year-old forward Radek Faksa from the Texas Stars in the AHL.

Faksa has 15 goals and 26 points in 28 games this season with Texas. In 18 games with the NHL Stars, he has one goal and three points.

Hitch’s recipe for more goals is a pretty simple one

Ken Hitchcock, David Backes, Dmitrij Jaskin, Paul Stastny, Patrik Berglund
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Ken Hitchcock wants the Blues to spend more time attacking and less time defending.

Because hockey isn’t rocket science, that’s why.

“To score and win games in the National Hockey League…you have to spend as much time in the offensive zone as you can,” Hitchcock told the Post-Dispatch.

“When you’re occupying the offensive zone more, you’re forechecking more. When you’re occupying the offensive zone more, the goalie has to make saves. They’re having to defend more. And the opposing team takes penalties on you. So they’re all connected. … What I want to see from us is staying on the puck for longer stretches.”

According to the stats, the Blues have not been spending as much time in the offensive zone as we’re used to seeing from them. In fact, in their last 20 games, they rank in the bottom third of the league in score-adjusted Corsi. That compares to their first 20 games when they were in the top third.

The result is fewer shots, and more importantly, fewer goals. The Blues have fallen all the way to 25th in offense, averaging just 2.37 goals per game. Last year, they finished fifth (2.91).

Yes, some of that may be due to the absence of Jaden Schwartz, and he should be back soon. But there’s a reason people are watching GM Doug Armstrong as the Feb. 29 trade deadline approaches. This team could probably use another piece up front.

The Blues host Minnesota Saturday.

St. Louis has scored just five goals in its last five games.

Goalie nods: Lindback ‘really excited’ for first start in almost three weeks

Anders Lindback
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Tonight in Anaheim, Anders Lindback will make his first start for the Arizona Coyotes since Jan. 16.

The Coyotes have been riding rookie Louis Domingue since just before Christmas, but Domingue has allowed five goals in each of his last three starts, including last night’s 5-4 loss to Chicago.

Lindback’s last appearance came Tuesday in relief, when he allowed one goal on 10 shots in a 6-2 loss to the Kings.

Lindback was in goal for one of Arizona’s three victories this season over Anaheim, stopping 33 of 36 shots in a 4-3 overtime win on Nov. 9. However, his .896 save percentage ranks among the lowest in the league.

Frederik Andersen is expected to start for the Ducks.

Elsewhere…

— No word yet on a Penguins starter in Tampa, but Ben Bishop will go for the Bolts.

Cam Ward will start for the Hurricanes in Winnipeg, where Connor Hellebuyck is expected for the increasingly desperate Jets.

— Joonas Korpisalo was solid last night in Vancouver, but the Blue Jackets have not announced their starter for tonight’s game in Calgary. Karri Ramo will be in goal for the Flames.

A ‘pretty solid two-way player,’ Sundqvist to make NHL debut for Penguins

Pittsburgh Penguins' Oskar Sundqvist (49) collides with Minnesota Wild's Jason Zucker (16) in the first period of a NHL preseason hockey game in Pittsburgh, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2014. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
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The latest Penguins injuries, these ones to Evgeni Malkin and Eric Fehr, have led to an opportunity for Oskar Sundqvist.

Sundqvist will make his NHL debut for the Penguins tonight in Tampa. The 21-year-old center has five goals and 11 assists in 39 AHL games this season.

“Sunny’s a pretty solid two-way player,” coach Mike Sullivan said, per the Tribune-Review.

“I don’t think he’s going to dazzle you with flashy plays, but I think he’s a guy who plays the game the right way. He’s hard to play against because of his size. He’s got a long reach, and he’s got a good stick.”

Sundqvist was selected 81st overall by the Pens in 2012. He’ll become the fourth player out of that Pittsburgh draft class to make his NHL debut, after Olli Maatta, Derrick Pouliot, and Matt Murray.

Veteran Matt Cullen will replace Malkin on the second line, skating with wingers Carl Hagelin and Phil Kessel.

Related: Nick Bonino out ‘at least a month’ with hand injury