Eric Lindros

Eric Lindros feels rule changes have led to more concussions

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If there’s a guy who has played in the NHL that would know a thing about what it’s like to deal with concussions, it’s Eric Lindros. The former Flyers star made his career as a punishing power forward and scorer in the NHL during his 14 seasons in the league. He also became famous for getting blown up with crushing body checks and suffering numerous concussions.

When Lindros retired from the league after the 2006-2007 season, it was apparent that repeated concussions left a mark on his career that saw him go from a dominating force in the NHL and winning the NHL MVP award in 1995 to a shell of himself and often injured when his career wrapped up with the New York Rangers, Toronto Maple Leafs, and Dallas Stars.

Today, Lindros spoke out about the NHL’s hot button topic in concussions and he had a few things to say about how the changes made to make the game more free-flowing have helped make it more dangerous.

Steve Green of Sun Media in Canada has the story.

“They did away with the red line (for the two-line offside pass), so the rate of speed through the neutral zone is much higher. Defencemen can’t help their partners by slowing opponents down between the blue line and the top of the circle and goalies can’t play the puck behind the goal line outside that (trapezoid) area.

“Would Raffi Torres have been coming through the neutral zone as fast as he was otherwise?” he added of the Vancouver forward’s hit on Brent Seabrook of the Chicago Blackhawks during their fist-round playoff series, which earned Torres an interference penalty, but no suspension. “Everyone’s being so reactive right now, but the problem’s actually been there for a long time. I think there are some strides being made, though.”

Fans and media alike have been critical of changes like the goalie’s trapezoid area, but the speed and skill of the game has made the game more entertaining and enjoyable for fans. Cutting down on obstruction through the neutral zone coupled with penalties being called more often for hooking and holding infractions have helped scoring pick up and the flow of the game to maximize.

As for the problems that some players have with keeping the elbows down and with running players from behind that also lead to head injuries, Lindros’ commentary was stiff for those guilty of that as well. A certain Pittsburgh Penguins forward drew most of Lindros’ ire while he feels badly for NHL disciplinarian Colin Campbell.

“There are a handful of players in the league who fall into that category in a large way and Matt Cooke is one of them,” Lindros said. “And you know what the unfortunate part is? When the time comes for him to be a free agent, some general manager will sign him and pay him more than someone who kills penalties or plays on the power play because of his — I can’t really find another word for it — trashy style of play.

“And there’s a large political scene in these situations. Colin Campbell (NHL vice-president and director of hockey operations, who dishes out the suspensions) is in a tough position, but there are a lot of back-door things done. Certain teams get taken care of differently than others, no question.”

It’s a good thing Lindros already wasn’t well liked in Pittsburgh to begin with.

Lindros’ words are damning as his role as a former player who has suffered immensely thanks to blows to the head, most of which occurred before the 2004-2005 lockout that saw the league change the rules to open up the game. Concussions are the talk of the league for a reason, but teams are also more careful with how they treat players and they’ve gotten better at diagnosing these injuries.

With guys like Lindros and Keith Primeau doing their part to speak up on this to put pressure on the league to make changes to protect the players it helps push the case for it. It’s up to the NHLPA and the Board of Governors to things to make the game safer but maintain the level of entertainment and excitement. It’s a delicate balance and it creates difficult problems but it’s something they’ve got to do before more players like Lindros and Primeau and others see their careers cut short.

NHL schedules hearing with Orpik over Maatta hit

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Brooks Orpik‘s late hit in Game 2 on Saturday might keep him out of Monday’s contest.

At the very least, the NHL Department of Player Safety intends to discuss the matter with Orpik today, per the department’s Twitter feed.

The incident occurred early in the first period when the Capitals forward smashed into Olli Maatta. The Penguins blueliner collapsed and needed some assistance getting off the ice. He didn’t return to the game.

You can see that hit below:

“I thought it was a late hit,” Penguins coach Mike Sullivan told CSN Mid-Atlantic. “I thought it was a target to his head. I think it’s the type of hit everyone in hockey is trying to remove from the game.”

The Penguins didn’t have an update on Maatta’s condition immediately following the contest.

‘I don’t know if it has sunk in yet,’ Jets GM Cheveldayoff gets lucky with draft lottery

Kevin Cheveldayoff, general manager of Winnipeg Jets, speaks to members of the media after winning the second selection of the NHL hockey draft lottery in Toronto, Saturday, April 30, 2016. (Chris Young/The Canadian Press via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT
The Canadian Press via AP
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The Toronto Maple Leafs may have won the draft lottery, but an argument can be made that the luckiest team last night was the Winnipeg Jets.

After all, Toronto had the best odds to get the top pick, but Winnipeg jumped from sixth to second in the draft order.

“I don’t know if it has sunk in yet,” Jets GM Kevin Cheveldayoff told the Winnipeg Sun. “I was doing my scrum at the end (of the show) with the media that was here, I said at one point, ‘Moving from six to two…’ and I had to catch myself and go through the mental notes in my head that it had just really happened.”

It’s likely, though not guaranteed, that the Maple Leafs will take Auston Matthews with the first overall pick. Assuming that’s the case, moving up to the second overall pick means that Winnipeg will have the option of choosing one of the two promising Finnish forwards available: Patrik Laine or Jesse Puljujarvi.

That’s potentially a big break for Winnipeg, especially after this campaign where the Jets went from making the playoffs for the first time since relocating to posting a 35-39-8 record. Through five campaigns in Winnipeg, the Jets have missed the playoffs four times.

The last time this franchise drafted this high was back when the then Atlanta Thrashers took Kari Lehtonen with the second overall pick in 2002. That was the final year in a string of four straight drafts where the Thrashers always had the first or second selection. The previous three years they took Patrik Stefan (1999), Dany Heatley (2000), and Ilya Kovalchuk (2001).

Related: Shanahan: Leafs earned No. 1 pick ‘the hard way’

Here’s your Stanley Cup playoffs schedule for today

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After the Eastern Conference Game 2s played out on Saturday, we’re getting the Western Conference set today. You can watch the action via NBC Sports Group’s television and digital platforms.

Here’s a quick overview of where specifically you can watch the contests:

St. Louis at Dallas (3:00 p.m. ET)

If you want to watch the game on television, NBC is the channel to do that. If you want to stream the game with the NBC Sports Live Extra app, click here.

Nashville at San Jose (8:00 p.m. ET)

The game will be televised on NBCSN. You can also stream the contest by clicking here.

Here’s some relevant pregame reading material:

With Eaves injured, Nichushkin will play for Stars in Game 2

Hitchcock, Blues know they need to slow down the Stars … but can they?

Sharks swarm in the third period, take down Predators in Game 1

Speed, skill help Stars score late victory to take series lead over Blues

Video: Penguins coach takes issue with late, high Orpik hit on Maatta

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The Pittsburgh Penguins have spoken out against a late, high hit that Washington Capitals defenseman Brooks Orpik threw on Olli Maatta early in the first period of an eventful Game 2 on Saturday.

Maatta left and didn’t return. He played only 31 seconds, and the Penguins were reduced to five defensemen for a large portion of the game. Orpik was given a minor penalty on the play, but the league’s Department of Player Safety may see it differently.

The hit occurred well after Maatta had gotten rid of the puck. He struggled on his way to the dressing room for further evaluation.

Based on multiple reports, Orpik wasn’t made available to the media following the game, which went to the Penguins as they earned the split on the road.

But the Penguins have taken issue with the hit.

“I thought it was a late hit,” said Penguins coach Mike Sullivan, as per CSN Mid-Atlantic. “I thought it was a target to his head. I think it’s the type of hit everyone in hockey is trying to remove from the game.”